Tagged: white sox

The Final One – I Think


I am all about giving respect where respect is due.  As always, anniversaries are a great way to show respect.  Baseball has never been one to shy away from commemorating something either big or small, or both.  2016 is the 30th anniversary of the last Mets World Series winner and the events marking that this year have been coming at fans both fast and furiously.  The book arena has been no exception to these celebrations, and while we have covered several of these in previous posts, I think I have the last two out there this year that I am going to do.  It is amazing how much time and money has been spent this year for this one and done World Series winner, but for me, it is time and I am ready to put this subject to bed.  So without further ado, here are the final two books.

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By:Mike Sowell-2016

Originally released in 1995 One Pitch Away takes a unique look at all the post-season teams in 1986.  You get perspectives from several key members who played for one of the four teams, which is a nice change, because most of these books about 1986 only cover the World Series teams.  You get a real good feel as to what was going through the heads of those involved during this amazing post-season.

I first read this when it was released in 1995.  My initial reaction then was the same as it is now.  It gives great insight into the games from the players themselves and Sowell’s work comes through strong.  The interviews seem well prepared for by both parties and is time well spent reading about the fab-four of the 1986 post-season.

If you are a fan of any of the teams involved check out this book, I don’t think you will be disappointed.  You can get this book from the nice folks at Summer Game Books.                 One Pitch Away

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By:Greg W. Prince-2016

The next book brings us to current times with the 2015 Mets.  By winning the division last year the Mets re-captured the hearts of the New York faithful in the Big Apple.  After a decade and a half or so of the Yankees being the toast of New York, it was nice to see the love spread around town.

Greg Prince who runs his own New York Mets blog, also has written about the Mets several times before.  He has an intense love for his team and it shows in his writing.  He takes a thorough look at the colorful cast of characters the Mets were able to put together for their improbable run in 2015.  If you are a fan of the Mets it is a fun reflection on an improbable year.  It is for sure a good read, but will probably be more enjoyable in 10 or 15 years when time has passed and the limelight has faded on this particular team.  This is another book that is time well spent reading today, but as it ages will become even more valuable to certain fans.  You can get this from the nice folks at Sports Publishing.

Amazin’ Again

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

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Greatness in the Shadows


There are injustices throughout the history of baseball that people have tried to remedy with varying degrees of success.  Integration was a major injustice on several levels that has been addressed within baseball.  While it has not been conquered on all levels, at least on the playing field it went as planned.  We are all familiar with the story of Jackie Robinson and Branch Rickey integrating the National League and being racial pioneers within the game.  But what about the first player on the American League side?  Today’s book takes a look at what transpired for the second racial pioneer in the game Larry Doby, and why he never got the respect, attention or praise that Jackie Robinson received only a few weeks prior.

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By Douglas Branson-2016

For me it is easy to understand why Larry Doby is not given as many pioneering accolades as Jackie Robinson, he was #2.  Yes he was the first in The American League, but was second under the umbrella that was Major League Baseball at the time.  No matter what the sport, being number two is never any good.  People only care about the first at whatever it is, so that was a major reason as to why Doby never got as much press at the time.  He also was in Cleveland instead of being in New York, a city with three teams which was just coming into its own golden era in the late 1940’s.  That factor alone is a big reason why many players got the coverage from the media that they did.  Doby could have been in Boise, Idaho and people could not have cared any less than they did when he was in Cleveland.  Also his relationship with owner Bill Veeck could have hindered press coverage of his career because of the disdain the other owners and the old boys network had for old sport shirt Bill.  These are just some of my ideas that I have had for a while and the book tries to prove some of these, but unfortunately does not make the grade.

Author Douglas Branson is a self proclaimed Larry Doby fan.  Finding both Doby and baseball at an early age he always felt that Doby had been slighted by the baseball gods and the media.  For various reasons I stated above he seems to want to try and prove these points through his research and other peoples writings.  He like to quote a lot of others peoples books in trying to make his case on the above points.  That method to me just felt lazy in the research of the book.    He also quotes earlier pages in the same book you are currently reading, which at times was driving me nuts.  It disrupted the flow of the book and was repetitive as well.

Factually, this book had several flaws as well.  I am not sure if it an editing fault in which the person doing it did not have a strong baseball knowledge, or if the editors felt the author’s facts were correct due to his vast self proclaimed baseball knowledge.  Either way there are several factual errors within the book.  Names, places and events were all part of the problem. There were so many errors it was embarrassing.  So many, that even the outside back cover where other authors tell you how great the book you are reading is, contained errors.  Usually from this publisher we see fewer errors and this book really surprised me on that front.

As hard as I tried I couldn’t find any redeeming qualities about this Larry Doby volume.  I really wanted this to be a good biography, since so few exist.  If you are one of those people that have to read any new book that contains anything about Larry Doby or the Cleveland Indians, then no matter what my final synopsis is you will still check it out.  But in all honestly, save your money on this, it is so riddled with errors and factual mistakes that it brings into question the entire body of work.

I think there has always been a shortage of Larry Doby material on the market, but this is not the direction it needs to take.  We need a quality Doby biography that is factually correct, and gives the man the respect he has deserved for decades.

If you still want to take a look at this one you can get it from the nice folks at the University of Nebraska Press

Greatness in the Shadows

Happy Reading

Gregg

Sometimes the Best Made Plans get Screwed Up!!!!


If you are looking for a book review tonight unfortunately you have come to the wrong place.  Being the name sake of this blog provides me the opportunity to have a public venting session when needed.  So please if you all will, amuse me tonight and let me complain so that by tomorrow I will be in a better frame of mind and will return to what I normally do around here…….baseball books and all that go with it.

For those of you who haven’t heard, my wife and I are expecting our first child in August. To celebrate the event we were going to take an epic trip in May and visit six MLB stadiums in eight days along with one Minor League stop in there as well.  Here is the link to the original story if you missed it.  We had some good responses and ideas from a few of my readers to some things we should not miss at the places we were going.  We also had some preliminary contact with a couple of the teams we were going to visit so it was looking like it was all going to come together nicely and be a fun trip.  Until today, when my little black cloud, that seems to follow me almost everywhere, showed its ugly face once again and rained all over our trip.  You may ask, what has happened that would be so crappy to ruin our epic trip……..here let me show you…………….

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That is a wonderful x-ray of my spine.  The same spine that now requires surgery and some sort of implant to fix and has essentially screwed us out of our trip.  I will be out of commission for at least a month and that falls right during the month of May.  So instead of following the Phillies from city to city, and eating an Egg Mcmuffin in Toledo at a baseball game, I will be sitting at home on the couch with my head buried in another baseball book.

My wife has brought up the proposition of doing this trip next summer with our new little bundle of joy in tow, but I haven’t 100% signed off that idea yet.  I do think having the new addition along would be a great bonus to the trip, I am just not sure how easy that much travel would be with someone that little.

I would like to think there is some sort of reason this has happened now and that we are better off staying home.  But more than likely, it is just my black cloud following me again.  So all the above being said if anyone has some ideas for books I should check out during my several week recuperation let me know.  I have a few weeks until my surgery date, but will still have several weeks at home to read.

So that’s the plan, we will make that my silver lining in all of this and hopefully get some new recommendations from my readers.  I have lots of faith in the folks I talk to in baseball book land and have already read a few of your ideas.  So I look forward to and also appreciate any ideas you all have.

Thanks for reading my rant, I appreciate you taking the time out of your day to listen to me whine and complain……………now back to your regular scheduled book reviews.

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

Ken Boyer-All Star, MVP, Captain


It is a very sad fact that no matter how good a player is or was, they sometimes get forgotten in baseball history.  Flashier, louder and more savvy players come along and steal the spotlight while these great players just go about their business playing the game.  This also extends to other arenas like the Hall of Fame, because some players get forgotten by the voters in Cooperstown as well.  Baseball publishing is another area where so many of the stories that should be told, if for no other reason than preservation of the game’s history, usually are not.  Ken Boyer is one of those players that had an incredible career, but truly never got any of the written credit he deserved.  Boyer recently shared a book about himself and his siblings and a few books aimed at the juvenile set were published during his career, but up until now he has never gotten the book he really deserved.  Kevin McCann has published the book that baseball fans have been wanting and waiting for about Ken Boyer.

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By:Kevin D. McCann-2016

Ken Boyer was a staple of St. Louis Cardinals baseball for a long time.  Receiver of numerous accolades during his career, he was the type of baseball player parents were glad that their kids looked up to.  For some reason throughout time, Boyer never got the recognition he deserved form historians.  Perhaps it was his low key demeanor and how he went about his business or some other unknown reason, but it really is a shame the world has not recognized his talents.

Kevin McCann has produced a real gem with this book.  He takes a look at Boyer’s early life and how his early life struggles helped forge the strong personality that his was.  He also takes a look at Boyer’s climb up the baseball ladder.  Experiences in the Minor Leagues all added to the personality that eventually shone through in St. Louis.

McCann also takes the reader on a journey along with Ken Boyer through his impressive time manning Third Base for the Cardinals.  World Series triumphs, All-Star Games and an MVP award just to keep it interesting were all bestowed upon Boyer while manning the hot corner.  Next he takes you through the winding down portion of his career with stops with the Mets, White Sox and Dodgers.  But the journey doesn’t stop there with Boyer.  The author shows us the steps Boyer took to remain in baseball.  By starting at the bottom and working his way back up again, he was able to take over the managerial reigns of the Cardinals for a while with limited success before his untimely death in 1982.

Finally McCann makes a solid case for Boyer’s inclusion in the Baseball Hall of Fame. Honestly if you can make a solid case to have Ron Santo in the Hall  at this point then Ken Boyer is a no-brainer for induction.  For some reason baseball has overlooked Boyer’s career and has shown to some degree the flaws with the Hall of Fame voting system.

McCann has written a great book with this one.  The writing style flows smoothly, moves fast and makes the reader feel like they were actually there.  It is a great story that I for one am glad is finally being told on the level it deserves.  The book is very hard to put down once you get started.

Baseball fans should check this one regardless of team allegiance.  It is a player that should be given the historical respect he deserves and hopefully this book takes an important step forward in gaining recognition for the legacy Ken Boyer left behind.

You can get this book from the nice folks at BrayBree Publishing

Ken Boyer-All-Star, MVP, Captain

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

Bill Veeck Baseball’s Greatest Maverick


Bill Veeck has been called a lot of things through the years.  Innovator, Showman, Maverick, the P.T. Barnum of baseball and of course some other not so many nice names.  A definite man before his time, no matter how many books come out about old Sportshirt Bill, I feel the need to read them.

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Bill Veeck, Baseballs Greatest Maverick

By:Paul Dickson-Walker & Company 2012

Bill Veeck always seemed to be the friend of the average fan.  From early beginnings with his father working for the Chicago Cubs, Bill spent a lifetime sharing his love of the game.  Working various jobs for the Cubs he cut his teeth in the field, and went on to team ownership.  With stops in Milwaukee, St. Louis, Cleveland and Chicago, Veeck left an indelible mark on baseball that while unconventional at the time would be appreciated today.

Paul Dickson undertakes the task of fitting all of Veeck’s exploits into one book.  He visits all of Bill’s baseball stops and the shenanigans that earned him some of the nicknames I mentioned above.  Ladies nights, midgets, game day give aways and of course disco demolition etched Bill’s name into baseball history.  Dickson also looks at Veeck’s activities outside of baseball including running a horse track.  Veeck had so many innovations both in and out of baseball that he could almost be called spectacular.

Truly an ambassador for baseball, Veeck was rightly enshrined in the Hall of Fame shortly after his death in 1986.  But what I find even better about this book is you see the principled man who stood upon that wooden leg——that he used most times as an ash tray.  From civil rights to baseball integration to countless other causes that presented themselves in society.  Bill Veeck had several causes he thought were worth fighting for.  This shows the worth of the man himself.  He may not been popular with the other owners for several different reasons, but as a person Bill Veeck seems like a really great guy.  This is finally the biography Bill Veeck deserves.  It portrays a complete and accurate picture of the man who was well before his time and someone to be admired for his forethought and decency for his fellow-man.

Paul Dickson did a great job with this book.  It is one of the best pieces I have ever read on Veeck and anyone who is any kind of fan of Veeck should read it.  There may be some duplicity in some of the stories you have heard before, but the painted picture is complete.  He may have made a lot of owners angry through the years, but he made lots more people happy and in the end, that’s what matters.  He leaves a legacy that should be appreciated for all time.

You can get this book from the nice folks at Walker & Co.

http://www.bloomsbury.com/us/search?q=bill+veeck&Gid=1

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

The Wizard of Waxahachie, Paul Richards and the End of Baseball as we knew it


Baseball is full of storied careers.  With the passage of time, some of the stories become bigger than life.  Some of those careers get clouded by the haze of nostalgia, or the feeling of what we used to have is better than today.  Todays book takes an honest look at a high-profile career and gave me a clear look at what really happened.

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The Wizard of Waxahachie

By:Warren Corbett – 2009 Southern Methodist University Press

Paul Richards mark on baseball is undeniable.  There are many things, by design or perhaps by accident, that have been attributed to him.  Pitch counts, five man pitching rotations, tracking on-base percentages, his fingerprints are all over baseball today.  What you don’t always see is the way the mind operated during his lifetime dedicated to the sport.

Warren Corbett wrote a book almost 25 years after Richards death.  Relying on family memories, notes and audio recordings that the family had provided, and has given a seldom seen side of Paul Richards.  He delves in to the devious side of Richards and his dealings with players and management during his illustrious career.  He also creates an accurate feeling that he was a hustler to many, both on the field and the golf course.

The most interesting aspect of this book to me is the trouble Paul Richards had bridging the generation gap.  When I say generation gap I am talking about the gap that was created near the end of his career in the dawn of free agency.  Richards had a lot of problems accepting the birth and subsequent power of the MLB Players Union.  It shows how after almost 50 years in baseball he was very set in his ways.

While after finding moderate success on and off the field in all his stops in baseball, Richards was a man of many friends and able to work the old boy network to his advantage and always find work.  That may be some of the reason he was not interested in adjusting to the new era of baseball.  The book is very heavy in detail about his time in Baltimore with the Orioles.  It was the longest stop of his career but still dominates about half of this book.  His stops in Houston, Atlanta, both stops in Chicago and finally Texas seem to be condensed versions to fit in the book.  I think a little more time could have been spent in Houston alone, due to the challenges of building a new franchise.

In the end Richards does not come out of the book looking like the genius he is regarded as today.  He seems almost human and to an extent skating through some of the stops in his career.  The end result of the book has shown us what I feel is a very fair and accurate portrait of Paul Richards.  Wayne Corbett did a great job on this biography especially since he was doing it almost 25 years after Richards death.

You can get this book from the nice folks at Southern Methodist University Press

http://www.tamupress.com

Happy Reading

Gregg