Tagged: walter johnson

Tales From the Deadball Era-Some of the Wildest Times in Baseball History


Nostalgia is a dangerous thing.  If not used correctly it can skew the memories of people, times and places of bygone eras.  It can make one think and long for something that in hindsight we believe was much better than it really was.  Since Baseball has been around for almost a century and a half, there are many eras that none of use were able to witness first hand.  We rely on history books, the research of many and documentation to see what really happened.  The Deadball era is one that many people have a fondness for and like to learn about it as much as they can.  I recently found a book that allows those Deadball era lovers to get some inside stories of what the game was really like during that time, without succumbing to all that messy nostalgia.

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By: Mark Halfon – 2014

Tales From the Deadball Era allows readers to do some time traveling if you will.  It takes them back to when violence, segregation and gambling were some of the nicer things happening at the baseball games.  A time when fields were in disrepair, equipment was unsophisticated and quite honestly the final product was somewhat of a mess.  It was nothing like the showcase we get to witness on a daily basis today.

Halfon introduces us to some of the major events of the era.  Showing us these highlights along with some of the great personalities ever to play the game, he gives the reader a very complete picture of what was going on during this era.  He also shows some of the more lighthearted moments that infiltrated the game during that period.  Many of these things you would not even dream of as being part of the game today.  The book also shows how necessity is the mother of invention.  Things we normally accept as part of the game had to come from somewhere, and this book shows us those things we should all be thankful for.

If you fancy yourself a novice baseball historian this book is a good book for you.  It gives the reader a nice feel for this time period and will leave you wanting to find out more information about the Deadball era and its personalities.  If you fancy yourself a novice historian on the John Thorn level then you may want to stay away from this one.  If you are at that level you more than likely wont get any new information from this book.  Honestly most fans will enjoy reading this book and spending the time traveling back to these decades long ago.

You can get this book from the nice folks at Potomac Books

Tales From the Deadball Era

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

Smoky Joe Wood-The Biography of a Baseball Legend


Throughout its history baseball has seen many changes.  From the way its played, the playing facilities, player and management relations as well as fan appreciation have all been subject to these changes.  For me now in my fifth decade of being a baseball fan it is hard to imagine what it was like nearly a century ago on the diamond.  So it always a learning experience for me to find a book about a player from that era and see how many changes have occurred over time.  Todays book takes a look at one of those players from yesteryear that really does not get all the accolades he truly deserves.

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By: Gerald C. Wood-2013

I will admit I was not very familiar with Smoky Joe Wood until recently.  I had read his interviews in other books, most recently Roger Angell’s Late Innings, but I never took the time to check out what his career was all about.  What changed is I found out Wood is buried in the next town over from me, Shohola, Pa.  Now that may not be a big deal to most, but when you realize I live in the mountains of Pennsylvania and baseball is the furthest thing from anyone’s mind around here, for a lonely baseball fan it becomes a big deal.

Gerald Wood takes the reader on a historical journey through Wood’s career.  Looking at really good numbers and career events that make a strong case for considering Wood for the Baseball Hall of Fame.  It draws comparisons to some of the game’s greats of that era and in my humble opinion Smoky Joe really can hold his own amongst the big name stars.

When you read about other players of this era they can sometimes come off stiff and dry.  This book is a good representation of Wood’s personality and he comes off as a pretty interesting man who led a fascinating life.  A book like this is more than a history lesson for fans of this era of baseball, it also brings to the forefront one of the personalities of the game that should not be forgotten.

When this book came out it received numerous awards and acclaim.  It was all well deserved and I found it very hard to put this book down.  It really gave a great feel of the times and brought forth a personality that is not as common or even main stream any longer.  Smoky Joe’s legacy lives on in this book and really should be looked at by the Veterans committee members who are discussing his enshrinement in the Hall of Fame this year.

Those baseball fans who haven’t done so already should check this one out.  It is more than a learning experience, it is a journey through a very interesting life backed by a strong and engaging personality.

You can get this book from the nice folks at the University of Nebraska Press

Smoky Joe Wood

Happy Reading

Gregg