Tagged: walter alston

Who Gets a Book-Part II


I asked this question on another post recently and received a litany of great answers.  I am well aware that there really is no criteria to who gets a book, but each of us has their own criteria of what really merits a book.  I for one am not here to pass along my thoughts on the subject because each of us has different views and it becomes a personal choice more than anything else.  I found two books recently that come from two ends of the spectrum on the field, but give the reader a very similar product in the end.

Ralph Mauriello and Ron Fairly have several things in common.  Most notably they are both Dodgers Alumni, and I have noticed the feeling of once a Dodger, always a Dodger.  But their careers took very different paths throughout the years.  While Mauriello had a short stint with the Major League team, he spent the majority of his playing years toiling in the minors, while Fairly put a couple of decades at the big league level with a few different stops around the league.  Now with such different playing careers and reaching different levels of success you would thing the end resulting books of their lives would be wildly different.  I am glad to say that could not be further from the truth.

Now that is not to say that both books are mirror images, but there are certain important qualities that shine through.  They both share their life and career experiences for the reader which helps give a well-rounded view of what they offered on the field.  This comes in especially helpful those readers that may not have been around during their playing days, it paints a picture in your mind of what baseball was like for each author as they made their way along their unique journey.  Both books also illustrate what great men both players were, the humility they had, both on and off the field and the honor it was for both of them to be part of the game they loved.  Family is also an important factor in both men’s lives and it is showcased very clearly in both books.  Finally, both books show what life is like after you are off the field.  While both men have taken very different paths in life you can see the underlying love of the game and the immense pride they both had to be on that field.

When I asked the who deserves a book question previously I thought I had a better handle on the answer .  Today I realize if you have a story to tell, no matter what their contribution to the game was, it’s a story worth telling.  It’s up to the readers to decide which stories that they want to read and what they find worthy of their time.  If it is a 20 year veteran or a cup of coffe player, they still have a lot to offer the readers.   For my money these both books make the cut.

If you like the Dodgers and the early years of California baseball, along with a spattering of stories about celebrities and baseball royalty then these books would be for you.  They both tell great stories throughout flow very nicely and you get two different views of the Once a Dodger Always a Dodger tag.

You can get these great books at the following links:

Ralph Mauriello

Ron Fairly

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

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Dodgerland-Decadent L.A. and the 77-78 Dodgers


Growing up as a Phillies fan in the late 70’s was full of heartbreak, and most of it was at the hands of the Los Angeles Dodgers.  My very first game that I went to at the ripe old age of five was the NLCS at Veterans Stadium against those same hated Dodgers.  That very game helped prepare me for a lifetime of mostly heartbreak brought to me by my beloved Phillies.  Today’s book takes a look at two of the Dodgers powerhouse teams from that era and in particular the 77 and 78 versions that really stuck it to my Phillies.

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By:Michael Fallon-2016

Both of these Dodgers teams contained a plethora of homegrown stars.  Ron Cey, Bill Russell, Steve Garvey, Davey Lopes are just a few of the players who came up through the Dodger farm system playing for their now Major League manager Tommy Lasorda.  It helped foster the environment that the Dodgers always outwardly portrayed, that of being one great big happy family.  It created unity and allowed them to play at a level on the field that was matched by very few teams in the league.  Its surprising that it took them until 1981 to finally win a World Championship.

Michael Fallon has written this book in an attempt to showcase the teams of 77-78.  It is a time where the Big Red Machine was on the decline in the N.L. West and the division was ripe for the Dodgers to pick it.  All of their homegrown studs were in their prime and all the stars were aligning for them to become a reigning powerhouse.  It was a great time to be a Dodger fan and embrace the changing of the guard between Alston and Lasorda, and learn the new fast paced ways of the late 70’s

Fallon does tell a good story within these pages and does a nice job relating these facts to the readers.  If you were not around in Los Angeles during these years you get a feel of what the vibe was like there.  In a time before the internet and instant gratification that we exist in now, it is a good throwback to remember the different ways of our world.  It also gives a glimpse of how old school baseball was still alive and well in the game during the late 70’s

The downside of this book for me was being from the other side of the continent I had trouble finding a reason to care about the social activities and politics of Los Angeles.  It was a lot of names that someone outside of California would be able to recognize or even care about, but for local readers it still gave a vision of life outside of baseball in L.A.  My other gripe about this book is that the author at times puts an autobiographical spin on it.  Stories about Dad’s hardware store and things like that really just felt out of place with what it seemed the book was trying to accomplish.  It almost seemed as if the book had a split personality and the two of them did not work well together.  My final gripe is that there were some minor baseball factual errors.  This seems to be a recurring problem in baseball books and I wish the publishers would hire a freelancer or someone like that just to fact check some of these things.  But that really is more of a pet peeve I guess.

Overall its a good baseball book, just be prepared for it to veer off in other directions every so often.  If you can live with that aspect of the book, and you have an interest in the Los Angeles Dodgers, then you will enjoy this book.

You can get this book from the nice folks at University of Nebraska Press

Dodgerland

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

Inventing Baseball Heroes


As I sit here and recover from surgery, I remember this is the week that my wife and I were going to be crisscrossing the country catching our baseball games at various stadiums.  It is somewhat depressing thinking about what could have been, but it is on the back burner for next year and hopefully without any unforeseen issues.  The time off recovering has forced me to read more and allowed me to catch up on some of my posts.  I have been able to look at some varying topics as of late and found a very interesting, off the beaten path topic for today’s book.

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By:Amber Roessner-2014

Inventing Baseball Heroes takes a look at how the media picks a certain player and uses their skills to fulfill a certain agenda.  That agenda is creating hero worship for certain players within the game.  This book centers on the early twentieth century and shows how the media helped make certain baseball players household names.

The book is looking at a different time in the world of media.  The two main forms at that time were Newspapers and Radio.  Through the use if these mediums the writers were able to promote their agendas in making certain players seem larger than life.  Their exploits on the field were magnetized to an audience that was looking for new heroes.

The down side to the public looking for heroes was the fact that it allowed journalists of that period to blur the line between fact and fiction.  Call it creative license if you want, but it leads me back to the old saying of never let the truth stand in the way of a good story.  With reporting being what it was during that time period, you really have to wonder how much of what we accept as truth now is actually accurate.

Throughout the history of baseball and more precisely through each generation, you can see players who were regarded as both the clear and concise hero and one who was the clear and concise villain.  These players are easily identifiable, and in more current times during the steroid era, some players have been on both sides of that line, again blurring the definition of hero and villain

Amber Roessner does a very nice job of looking at the actions of the media during the formative years of baseball as we all know it.  It makes you wonder how much of what we accept as historical fact in the game is actually generated from the imagination of the media.  It is something that one can clearly see continuing throughout the history of the game as the generations have passed on.

If you have any interest in the early media coverage of the game you should check this book out.  It shows how our game was shaped in the eyes of our society.  It also shows to some extent how we as an American society look to our heroes for guidance on how to act in our world.

You can get this book from the nice folks at Louisiana State University Press

Inventing Baseball Heroes

Happy Reading

Gregg