Tagged: wade boggs

The 1986 World Series-There Was More Than Game Six


I am a big fan of anniversaries and nostalgia in baseball.  Its good to remember where we came from and what has been accomplished, so a remembrance is always a welcome sight in my eyes.  This year we knew it was coming, the 30th anniversary of the 86 World Series.  It seems to  be a bigger deal this year than the 25th anniversary was, but I always thought the 25th was celebrated more than the 30th, so I’m confused.  Be my confusion what it is, we have chosen to go all out and celebrate the 30th anniversary of one of the most thrilling World Series’ on record.  With this anniversary there have been a slew of new books coming out celebrating the World Series champs, but today’s books take a look at both teams and gives balanced comparisons of them.

SABR-1986-Mets-Red Sox-image

By: SABR-2016

If you are not familiar with the Society for American Baseball Research (SABR), you have no idea what you are missing.  They are the folks who do tireless research and find us more information about our sport than we all ever thought possible.  They research complete teams and individual players, and do a stellar job at both.  New for this years 30th Anniversary, they have produced two different but connected books that remind fans that the series was about more than just Bill Buckner.

Both of the books follow the same format, so as I am describing them it pertains to both volumes.  The authors look at each man on that respective teams roster for the 1986 season.  Giving in depth bios, analysis of the season performance and interesting facts about the players.  They follow the same format for the Manager, General Manager, Coaching Staff and Announcers.  So if this is not your home town team you get a real good feel of their complete personnel package.

Next they look at key team performances throughout the year and take note of several key games that helped the team gain momentum and what made them work as a cohesive unit.  Next you see analysis of the Championship Series and the World Series.  Finally, it asks a few honest questions about the way the teams were constructed and the important numbers that stick out for each team.

Quite honestly, this is your typical SABR book and is in line with what we have all come to expect from them.  It is well researched and you feel very comfortable in the fact that you can take all information at face value and accept as that. Mainly this is because of the tireless efforts and dedication of the SABR staff and the quality work that every one of them puts forth on SABR projects.  Each one of these folks that worked on these books should be commended because they have created another quality product.

Baseball fans should check this out because there is always something new fans can learn from these types of SABR books, plus it’s always fun to remember Bill Buckner.

You can get these books from the nice folks at SABR.

1986 Mets/Red Sox

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

Game 7, 1986-Failure and Triumph in the Biggest Game of My Life


I think I am a fairly ordinary guy.  Growing older somewhat gracefully, as my inner child slowly calms down.  I think a by-product of growing older is your memory is not as great as it used to be.  If you asked me what I ate for breakfast a few days ago, I may have trouble giving you the correct answer.  Another side effect of the passage of time on the memory is nostalgia.  You may romanticize things and enjoy them much more today than you actually did thirty years ago.  In the last few years there have been books published that dissect a game from several decades prior, inning by inning and pitch by pitch, which leads to my first of many questions.  How do players remember everything that happened during a specific game, every thought process, every tobacco spit and every sneer at an opposing player.  If you ask why am I asking such a silly question, please see the sentence above about my breakfast.  Anyhow, today’s book follows this same format about game seven of one of the most dramatic World Series in recent memory.

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By:Ron Darling-2016

The 1986 World Series without a doubt was full of plenty of drama.  From the New York Mets trek to the big dance via Houston, to Bill Buckner making himself a footnote in baseball history, 1986 is a hard one to forget.  Ron Darling on most other baseball pitching staffs would have easily been the Ace, but on the Mets he was in the shadows of one phenom, namely Dwight Gooden.  Nonetheless Darling was the arm on tap to pitch Game 7 of the 1986 World Series.  Most people forget that the Buckner error was in Game 6 which then led to needing to play a game 7.

Ron Darling has made a nice little post pitching career for himself being a baseball analyst for both the Mets and the MLB Network.  He has great natural insight into the game and always explains the nuances to the fans so that the get a full understanding of the issues at hand.  Darling takes the same approach in his new book.

He takes the reader through Game 7 inning by inning, explaining the thought process used in his pitches as well as what was going on around him.  You see how the pitcher Ron Darling was processing the events of the day, but he also shows how the person Ron Darling was interpreting it as well.  It gives a real good rendition of the players take on what happened in Game 7, from a person who was on an emotional see-saw the entire evening.

Darling also gives a little glimpse of his personal life as well as some takes on his New York teammates.  It is not an in-depth analysis of his fellow Mets but it certainly gives the reader a behind the scenes glimpse of the team.

The question still sticks in my mind, how do you remember this much vivid detail 30 years later?  Admittedly he used some video footage to “refresh” his memory, but I still find it hard to accept these types of books as 100% credible.  Time easily distorts things even with the aide of video tape.  It also seems to some degree Ron darling is apologizing for his pitching performance but does seem to take the attitude of “I am sure glad we won, even though I sucked”.

This book is an enjoyable and quick read.  It flows smoothly and if Ron Darling is remembering correctly, gives the reader some great detail into Game 7.  It was a World Series to remember and all baseball fans will enjoy reliving this one special game.

You can get this book from the nice folks at St. Martins Press

Game 7, 1986

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

They Call Me Oil Can – Baseball, Drugs and Life on the Edge


Even though baseball players are constantly in the public eye, it does not mean you always get one hundred percent of the details.  Almost every players image until recently was a product of their teams media relations department. They would work tirelessly to keep certain issues and events out of the public eye.  In the advent of our instant media society some of the demons escape long before anyone on the team knows anything about them.  Such is the tale of todays book.  Oil Can Boyd was a rising star but you never knew about all of the demons lurking inside his soul.

By: Dennis Oil Can Boyd - 2012

By: Dennis Oil Can Boyd – 2012

Dennis Boyd was a superstar not long into his career.  With a nickname like Oil Can, he was bound to be a fan favorite in Boston.  Underneath the smiling surface were demons that were gnawing away at the star pitcher and made his life difficult at the very least.  Being under the sports microscope that Boston is probably didn’t help Boyd’s problems and the end results were more than likely etched in stone long before anyone realized.

A product of the deep south, Dennis Boyd was a youngster when racism was rampant.  Events that occurred during his upbringing did a lot of damage in shaping the man he became.  You can see that many of these events effected the way he approached his own life and how he dealt with people, thus the outcomes that occurred during his career. These same feelings towards the world around him also show how it led him into a life of drugs that damaged his career and relationships with those close to him.

By far Dennis Boyd does not come out of this book looking like a villan or a victim.  He comes across as an honest caring man who just wants to be accepted for who he is.  Unfortunately, it is one of those circumstances in life that his surroundings have effected him so deeply that he used the only outlets he felt were available.   The book is his honest account of what he feels life has dealt him, and it seems he is not holding anything back.  After reading this book I think I have a better understanding of what makes Oil Can tick, and it seems he is a half decent guy that just had some bad breaks.  My personal view of him has improved through reading this book and I don’t think he is really the head case that the media had made him out to be.

Red Sox and Expos fans will love this book, just because of the team connection.  I think fans in general may like it as well because the book is very honest.  It does not pull any punches and Dennis Boyd becomes a better stronger man as the book progresses.  Even if you hated Oil Can it might be worth checking out because you perception of him may change by the end.

You can get this book from the nice folks at Triumph Books

They Call Me Oil Can

Happy Reading

Gregg