Tagged: veterans commitee

A Book That Most of Us Have Been Waiting For


There are few figures in baseball that were as polarizing as Dick Allen was during his career.  Philadelphia fans maintained a blurry line between love and hate for Dick which helped forge his reputation that followed him from city to city.  Allen was a bonafide superstar during his era, who some say never met his true potential.  Multiple stops in his career ended in messes that were partially Dick’s fault but in hindsight not totally.  There have not been many attempts at putting Dick Allen’s complete story in print, quite honestly, this is one of the few I have ever found in my travels.  Now there is a new book coming out in a few weeks that gives a more in depth look at the man behind the legend.

15516

By: Mitchell Nathanson-2016

Where does one even start when talking about Dick Allen?  He is such a complex personality that has gotten so little attention since his retirement that it would seem overwhelming to any writer willing to tackle the subject.  The prior book about Dick Allen as mentioned above relied on interviews with Allen himself.  It presented some conflicting stories that made the reader feel like he did not get the whole story.  This new book relies on interviews with some people who witnessed events first hand and gave a different perspective on everything that happened.

Nathanson walks the reader through Dick’s entire career, from the minors to all his stops in the majors.  He shows the horrible treatment Allen endured in the south during his baseball training as well as the same racism he he had to put up with playing for Philadelphia.  The author dissects the love hate relationship between Allen and the Phillies fans and shows his treatment may have been a part of the bigger mindset of the town itself, not just a personal dislike for Allen.   On the flip side of the City of Philadelphia’s shortcomings you also get to see how Dick Allen did not make the situation better for himself along the way.  Some things get clarified while other things may forever be a mystery.  Neither party is innocent in the course of events but this book helps clarify the fact that the events that happened in Philadelphia were not all Dick Allen’s fault.

The author also covers all of the other stops along Dick’s career path.  While each one had a mix of success and trouble, each one ended the same way, the team was glad to be moving on.  The most interesting part to me of this book was the events that led up to Dick’s return to the Phillies.  You see the change in the city’s  mindset and team management that helped welcome Dick home for one last stand.  You can see the healing on both sides and the change of attitudes.  To some extent I think the Phillies fans realized what they once had and to some degree were willing to make amends for past indiscretions.  This also allowed Dick to leave baseball on his own terms and finish up with the Oakland A’s.  The only thing I wish this book had was more about Dick on a personal level.  It mostly sticks to his career, but does offer a few glimpses behind the scenes.  I wold like to know more about Dick Allen the person, but few of us will ever be so lucky.

This book really sheds some light on Dick Allen and the events of his career.  There are plenty of things that transpired that fans, owners, management and Dick himself should not be so proud of, but it does give a complete picture of what happened during those times.  All that aside, the most recent question as of late is does Dick belong in the Hall of Fame.   If you remove the Phillies association out of the equation for me, I still say yes to his induction.  He was a major player in the 60’s and 70’s and made some great contributions to the game on the field and contributed some great things of the field when he mentored younger players. His introverted personality may have rubbed some people the wrong way at the time, but it still not diminish his contributions to the game.  Hopefully the Hall of Fame Veterans Committee will get it right the next time around.

Baseball fans should not miss this book.  It is a player that never has gotten much book coverage and it really sheds new light on what we all thought about Dick Allen.

You can get this book from the nice folks at The University of Pennsylvania Press

God Almighty Hisself

Happy Reading

Gregg

Lucky Me-My 65 Years in Baseball


Baseball lifers are a tough breed.  When you find one in this day and age, look at what they have witnessed.  They have seen the game go from small wages and managements sole control to a strong players union and skyrocketing salaries.  They have seen stadiums come and go, the passing of legends and friends as well as their game becoming a big business.  On the flip side of all this, baseball lifers have the opportunity to share some great stories.  Today’s book is no exception to the fact that there are lots of stories just waiting to be told.

51y42ZRAEfL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_

By: Eddie Robinson and C. Paul Rogers III 2015

This book is a re-issue of the book that first came out from another publisher in 2011.  Eddie Robinson walks you through his baseball career, first as a player and then as a general manager in the major leagues.  He has been witness to some great moments in baseball history from both sides of the fence.  He also states that he has never worked a day in his life, because he has been lucky enough to be involved in the game he dearly loves.

Robinson takes you through his playing career, overcoming challenges to make his dreams come true and become a big league player.  He was blessed enough played in an era with some of the games all-time greats and was able to have his career coincide with great moments in history.  He had a respectable career that would make any mother proud, it was by far not Hall of Fame worthy, but he still achieved his dreams.

After his playing career ended, Robinson entered the business side of baseball.  Most notably becoming general Manager for both the Texas Rangers and Atlanta Braves.  He tells some great stories of happenings at each stop and again he got to witness some great things such as Hank Aaron’s 715th Home Run.  If you could have a charmed life as a General Manager, this may just be it.

One thing I could not shake with this book the entire time I was reading it was Robinson’s attitude.  While telling stories about his playing career, I almost got the feeling that Eddie thought he was much better than the world ever gave him credit for.  Essentially he felt that he was slighted because of the era he played in because it contained so many great players.  This vibe carried over into his General Managers days and for me it just put a negative feel to some parts of the book.  By far this is not a bad book, I just felt uncomfortable as the stories progressed, mainly because Robinson always seemed to feel slighted in some way.

Fans regardless of the team allegiance will enjoy this book.  It is a lot of stories from baseball’s golden age as well as stories from the years baseball underwent great changes.  There are no earth shattering stories, just a basic autobiography from someone who has really enjoyed his multi-faceted life within the game of baseball.

You can get this book from the nice folks at the University of Nebraska Press

Lucky Me

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

In Pursuit of Pennants-Baseball Operations from Deadball to Moneyball


Its that time of year where baseball’s winter meetings are upon us.  The one week a year where the business side of baseball comes to the forefront.  Players are traded, free agents get signed and the Rule 5 draft occurs.  For some fans it is an early Christmas present when your team signs that key free agent, while for others it might be the time you say goodbye to one of your favorite players.  For the people that work these meetings it is just another day of business as usual.  Fans sometimes get so engrossed in their team they may forget at the end of the day that baseball is still a business.  For the people who are involved it is their job.  A job many of us envy, but still a job nonetheless.  Now there is a book that walks us through the business side of baseball and shows how the more things change, they somehow stay the same.

51llcZG0tYL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_

By: Armour & Levitt-2015

In Pursuit of Pennants takes an in depth look at the business of baseball, almost a history of the business side of you will.  It looks at franchises over the last 100 years, showing the reader the dealings and hard business decisions that had to be made to produce winners.  The book looks at how the teams were assembled and what worked and did not work.  What key moves were made to help teams lay the groundwork for success, what moves should have been made to sustain the success or which moves proved to be just plain foolish.

The book also shows how teams heavily rely on their off-field personnel to help them build winners.  The chain of command goes well beyond just the General Managers.  All aspects of the front office play a part in the success of the team.  It shows how everyone must believe in the team philosophy to be able to have it work at any level.  It also shows that the same principles employed in the Moneyball theory have always been around.  It may not have been the same ways to measure productivity or forecast any outcomes, but there were still theories that they adhered to that evolved as the game changed.  The bottom line for all teams is to produce a winner.

Like other Armour and Levitt books, this book may not be for everyone.  It is part history book, part reference book and part narrative.  If you are looking for a nice easy flowing story that rolls through the book, this is not it.  If you are looking for detailed information on the business side of baseball and a very thorough history lesson then this is your book.  The authors have done a great job of explaining a not so glorious subject to the readers.  The topic to some may be the equivalent of watching paint dry, but for those who stick with the book, you will be greatly rewarded in the end.   You will walk away with a better understanding of how teams function off the field and understand the mindset needed to build a winner.

Baseball fans across the board that dedicate the time to reading this book will enjoy it.  It honestly does start of a little slow but does pick up the pace enough to keep your interest through the rest of the book, so overall you wont be disappointed.

You can get this book from the nice folks at the University of Nebraska Press

In Pursuit of Pennants

Happy Reading

Gregg