Tagged: University of Nebraska Press Jackie Robinson

Jackie and Campy – A look inside the fractured relationship


In life sometimes you find people, that no matter the circumstances, just don’t click.  It could be differences in personality, belief differences, values or a host of other reasons.  Todays book takes an in-depth look at Jackie Robinson and Roy Campanella and the relationship they had during the integration of the Brooklyn Dodgers.

j&C

Jackie & Campy

By: William C. Kashatus – 2014 University of Nebraska Press

Jackie Robinson was obviously the player chosen by Branch Rickey to integrate the Dodgers.  We are all familiar with Robinson so really no need to go through the history of integration here.  Roy Campanella was also chosen by Branch Rickey to further integrate the Dodgers after the success of Robinson.  The fascinating part about this story is that these two men were chosen to do the same job, and had such extremely different personalities.

Jackie Robinson was deeply planted in his beliefs and was very prideful..  He understood what his place in history was going to be and realized that it would lead to the opportunity to further the cause in society.  Roy Campanella was a former Negro League player and understood what the cause was trying to promote.  The difference was that Roy wanted to just play baseball and not be a crusader for the cause.  He was never one looking to rock the boat or make a point.  Both men were aware of their place in history, they just went about securing that place in different ways.

Kahatus does a very nice job in this book.  He takes the approach that the reader is not very familiar with the entire process that ensued with Branch Rickey’s great experiment.  He details each players background on and off the field, and the steps that Rickey walked them through prior to reaching Brooklyn.  If you are very familiar or well read on baseball integration, this part may be a little tedious for you.  Next the author moves to the on field activities between the Dodgers and the other teams.  It shows the bigotry and events that transpired during this ground breaking time.  Again it may be a little tedious for the reader if they are well versed in these events.

The most interesting part of this book I found was the dynamic between Robinson and Campanella.  You see how their difference of opinion as to what their role in integration was, created friction between the two teammates and eventually led to animosity in the clubhouse.  It’s an interesting look at the way two people fighting for equality and acceptance were not able to extend that courtesy to each other.  It is the first time I came across this story and found it quite interesting.  The chapters leading up to this section may be repetitive and found in other books, but the last section made the book worthwhile.  These two men made a lasting impression and changed the game for the better and proved they were human as well.  If you are not well read in the history of baseball integration this book does a great job of giving you a comprehensive picture. If you are well versed on it, all is not lost.  You do get some new information that makes it worth the time to read.

You can get this book from the nice folks at The University of Nebraska Press

http://www.nebraskapress.unl.edu

Happy Reading

Gregg