Tagged: tommy lasorda

Who Gets a Book-Part II


I asked this question on another post recently and received a litany of great answers.  I am well aware that there really is no criteria to who gets a book, but each of us has their own criteria of what really merits a book.  I for one am not here to pass along my thoughts on the subject because each of us has different views and it becomes a personal choice more than anything else.  I found two books recently that come from two ends of the spectrum on the field, but give the reader a very similar product in the end.

Ralph Mauriello and Ron Fairly have several things in common.  Most notably they are both Dodgers Alumni, and I have noticed the feeling of once a Dodger, always a Dodger.  But their careers took very different paths throughout the years.  While Mauriello had a short stint with the Major League team, he spent the majority of his playing years toiling in the minors, while Fairly put a couple of decades at the big league level with a few different stops around the league.  Now with such different playing careers and reaching different levels of success you would thing the end resulting books of their lives would be wildly different.  I am glad to say that could not be further from the truth.

Now that is not to say that both books are mirror images, but there are certain important qualities that shine through.  They both share their life and career experiences for the reader which helps give a well-rounded view of what they offered on the field.  This comes in especially helpful those readers that may not have been around during their playing days, it paints a picture in your mind of what baseball was like for each author as they made their way along their unique journey.  Both books also illustrate what great men both players were, the humility they had, both on and off the field and the honor it was for both of them to be part of the game they loved.  Family is also an important factor in both men’s lives and it is showcased very clearly in both books.  Finally, both books show what life is like after you are off the field.  While both men have taken very different paths in life you can see the underlying love of the game and the immense pride they both had to be on that field.

When I asked the who deserves a book question previously I thought I had a better handle on the answer .  Today I realize if you have a story to tell, no matter what their contribution to the game was, it’s a story worth telling.  It’s up to the readers to decide which stories that they want to read and what they find worthy of their time.  If it is a 20 year veteran or a cup of coffe player, they still have a lot to offer the readers.   For my money these both books make the cut.

If you like the Dodgers and the early years of California baseball, along with a spattering of stories about celebrities and baseball royalty then these books would be for you.  They both tell great stories throughout flow very nicely and you get two different views of the Once a Dodger Always a Dodger tag.

You can get these great books at the following links:

Ralph Mauriello

Ron Fairly

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

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Bring In the Right-Hander!


Sometimes I find a baseball autobiography and wonder if this player really needed their own book.  If that player had an average, or even less than average career, what could they possibly bring to the table?  Sometimes I get a pleasant surprise when one of those average player writes a book that holds my interest and produces a good reading experience for me.  Today’s book falls into that pleasant surprise category and from an unlikely source to boot.

Reuss-Book-University-of-Nebraska-Press

By:Jerry Reuss-2014

Jerry Reuss by most standards had an average career.  Never the ace of a staff, but a serviceable arm that would eat innings and help teams in their push to the top.  Pitching for eight teams over a 22 year span, Reuss compiled an impressive win total of 220.  From a pitcher that never won more than 18 games in any given season,  that is an impressive total.

Jerry Reuss starts the reader on a journey through his early years in Missouri, where he first dreamed of becoming a major league pitcher.  Signing with the hometown St. Louis Cardinals, Reuss had all the makings of  a real life dream come true.

Reuss then shows the reader what the inside, off the field life of a baseball player is really like.  Back stabbings by the upper management people he trusted, trades, releases and other not so pleasant things a player deals with on an annual basis.  It shows how much more players even back in those days had to deal with off the field.

The big thing I took away from this book is how remaining true to yourself and dealing fair with people will help you get ahead at whatever your vocation.  Jerry Reuss played more years than many of his contemporaries did who maintained the same skill set.  It comes across as being a combination of perseverance at his chosen trade and being a decent person on and off the field.  In the end this average pitcher ended his career, after a few stops in different cities, the proud owner of a World Series ring.

This book is a pretty enjoyable read.  It moves along at a brisk pace and holds the readers interest through more than just on the field happenings.  Anecdotes about himself and teammates keep you engaged and give you a real feel what it was like to be a teammate of Reuss’.  It also shows a glimpse of the personality of Reuss himself which comes across as a fun loving guy and a great teammate.

If you are a fan of Reuss or any of the teams he played for, take the time to read this book.  It is not a book that one would compare to War & Peace in any way.  It is more of a breezy light hearted read of an average pitcher with an interesting journey.  I wasn’t expecting much out of Reuss’  stories about his career and his teammates, but was pleasantly surprised at what I got.  You never know who or what is going to present you with an enjoyable book.

You can get this book from the nice folks at the University of Nebraska Press

Bring In the Right-Hander!

Happy Reading

Gregg

The Hall – A Celebration of Baseball’s Greats


Choosing the best of the best can really ignite some serious debates.  Who belongs, who doesn’t, who should be eligible and who should not even be there always makes for good conversations among friends.  The Baseball Hall of Fame, which is nestled in that sleepy little town in upstate New York, is the mecca of baseball junkies.  You can walk among some of the greatest artifacts throughout the history of the game as well as visiting the memorials to all the games brightest stars.  If you are not lucky enough to be located within a reasonable distance of the Hall like I am (2 hours), then you may not be able to get there as often as you would like or even at all for that matter.  I found a book, if you are one of the unlucky few that may never get there that will help you experience some of the magical aura that is The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.

The Official 75th Anniversary Book-2014

The Official 75th Anniversary Book 2014

The Baseball Hall of Fame has really published a first-rate book with this one.  The quality of the book alone is incredible.  From the paper stock, to the printing this is a really nice book.  Quality of the book is something I really never comment on, but this one is really that good.

The Hall has compiled all its members, including managers, executives and umpires and given the reader in-depth overviews of every single person.  Each player section is broken down by position into its own chapter and then sorted by induction year.  It has dedicated two pages to each personality and gives a nice biography of their career as well as a brief snippet of that persons unique personality.  It is a nice feature for each person that you don’t always get in these types of books, because it is usually more focused on the career numbers.  Each person’s Hall of Fame plaque also heads their individual page so you are able to read exactly what is hanging on the wall in Cooperstown.

The other nice feature is a several page essay at the beginning of each chapter.  A player from that chapter has written about his own experiences during his career that led him to The Hall of Fame.  It is  something you don’t normally see in a Hall of Fame coffee table book and adds a real human touch to this book.  I think the Hall of Fame sometimes lacks a human touch when speaking about its members, so this brings it back to a very personal and fan friendly level.

This book covers all the players that were enshrined as of the publication date.  The only down side to these types of books is that they are not accurate for very long.  Once the next July rolls around someone is missing.  But honestly this book is done so well it should belong in every fan’s library.  You may be familiar with some of the names, but there are others that are a real learning experience for fans young and old.

You can get this book from the nice folks at Little Brown and Company

http://www.hachettebookgroup.com/titles/the-national-baseball-hall-of-fame-and-museum/the-hall-a-celebration-of-baseballs-greats/9780316213028/

Happy Reading

Gregg

The Rise and Fall of Dodgertown – 60 Years of Baseball in Vero Beach


Teams that have been in existence for a long time have great histories.  It is inevitable that through the passage of time some neat things are going to happen and in turn create some great traditions.  The Dodgers are one such team that have that long and storied tradition.  Being part of the national pastime almost from the beginning, they have created some wonderful memories through the years as well as leaving their mark on the great game we all love.  One such tradition was Vero Beach, Florida.  The spring training home of the Dodgers for decades, they basically made that town their own little world.  Today’s book takes a look at the mark the Dodgers left on that sleepy little town in Florida.

$_35

By: Rody Johnson-2008

Vero Beach in the 1940’s was a sleepy quiet little town in Florida, at least until the Dodgers arrived.  Looking to save a buck and avoid segregation issues the Dodgers created their own little complex on a vacated military base.  The idea of doing that at the time was unheard of, but does show how the Dodgers liked to not always follow tradition.  It allowed for all the players to stay in one location and form a bond as a team, that none of the others had.

Rody Johnson has written a book that chronicles the entire existence of the Dodgers in Vero Beach.  From their first spring at the crude facility through the end when the Dodgers folded their tent and moved to Arizona, you see what became Dodgertown.  The book shows you how the Dodgers remodeled and expanded their facility through the years and how the local government was effected both by the Dodgers and other businesses that called Vero home.  It also shows the results of the growth of Vero Beach had, because the Dodgers called that town home.  Being more than a spring training complex you also get to see the operations the Dodgers had there pretty much year round that helped the economy of the area grow.

This is an in-depth book that shows how a team that you really only thought of as a spring training tenant really was a participant in the town all year.  If you are not familiar with the Dodgers spring training operations, as I wasn’t, you will be surprised at the magnitude of their facility.  It was called Dodgertown for a reason, and this book shows the reader that it really was warranted.

Dodgers fans will enjoy it as well as all baseball fans.  It shows a cool operation that was a big part of the teams history, and the likes of something we may never see again of this magnitude.

You can get this book from the nice folks at the University Press of Florida

http://upf.com/book.asp?id=JOHNSS08

Happy Reading

Gregg

Out at Home – The Glenn Burke Story


Baseball books can provide valuable history lessons.  Even if they are of the biography genre, they can still give valuable lessons to the reader about a multitude of things.  It has always been said that baseball mimics society and in the case of todays book that may ring true.  It shows how society has changed and become more tolerant and accepting.  Baseball may be slow to change at times but in this case, they have finally caught up with society.

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Berekely Re-Issue Edition-2015

Glenn Burke was the first openly gay athlete in Major League Baseball.  While that alone is trailblazing, in the end he suffered the wrath of the game and became black-balled.  He had a very short career in the majors playing for both the Los Angeles Dodgers and Oakland A’s in the late 70’s.  For his brief career he put up decent numbers and probably had he not been openly gay would have had a longer career.  When you are the first person who does anything different in baseball it seems that you have a much more difficult time being accepted than the next person.  Just ask Jackie Robinson, being a trend setter is hard work.

Glenn Burke suffered the wrath of the baseball hierarchy and essentially lost his career for it.  Even though some of his teammates knew about his sexual orientation and didn’t care, the baseball establishment was not embracing it.  Glenn eventually died of AIDS in 1995 and this book was his way of getting his story out before his untimely death.  It is a very good book that shows the struggles and humiliation Glenn had to endure just to be himself and play the game he loved.  It shows some of the intolerant practices that existed during his time in the jock world of Major League Baseball.

More importantly this book allows the reader to see how both the game and society has evolved in the twenty years since its initial publication.  MLB has now added the Ambassador of Inclusion position in Billy Bean so that these issues don’t happen again.  This book also shows how society’s views have evolved in regards to homosexuality and it is not as big of an issue as it once was.  It shows that everyone has a place within our society and while it may not happen as fast as some people would like it has made some progress.  One thing I found interesting between the original publication of this book and the re-issued edition is that they used the same cover photo, but the Dodgers logos had been removed his uniform.  It just struck me as odd that after all this time they would remove them.

Glenn Burke is pretty much at this point a footnote in baseball history but this book does give you a nice glimpse of both the player and the man.  Perhaps if he was somewhere else on a less profile team than the Dodgers, his career may have lasted longer but honestly who knows.  After all he went through you get no signs of bitterness from Glenn for his outcome in life.  He was proud of who he was and who he loved, and hoped in the end he would be remembered as a good person and what more can any of us ask for in life.

You can get this book from the nice folks at Berkeley Publishing Group

http://www.penguin.com/book/out-at-home-by-glenn-burke-erik-sherman/9780425281437

Happy Reading

Gregg