Tagged: The Negro Leagues

The League of Outsider Baseball-An Illustrated History of Baseball’s Forgotten Heroes


The history of baseball has so many nooks and crannies that it is almost impossible as a fan to say you have heard everything.  Some of the history is well documented and some is taken from legend or word of mouth.  No matter what its historical format, baseball allows for almost everyday to be a learning experience.  Today’s book is one of those that puts a unique and interesting spin on some well-known and some of the more obscure baseball personalities that were an integral part of the game’s history.

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By: Gary Cieradowski-2015

Now I am in no way an artsy guy.  Never a big fan of the creative arts and not a big fan of comic books growing up for whatever reasons that may be.  So when they guy who admits all that, says to you this book is something very unique an enjoyable, you may want to pay attention.

Gary Cieradkowski is hard to pin down.  Is he an artist or a writer?  He created both parts of this book and did a very good job with each.  He has brought to life through his artwork, faces of the past.  He has done both the famous and obscure from the annals of baseball history.  Creating both artwork and a baseball card set that puts faces to some of the names you may never have heard of, actually seen a picture of or been exposed to up until now.  Showing the stars in their pre-fame lives, you get to see a glimpse of Sandy Koufax in Coney Island garb and Walter Johnson on an Anaheim baseball card.  It also  brings to light the stories of those that lurked in the shadows of Major League Baseball.  Semi-pros, Negro Leagues, Barnstormers, Journeymen, Rouges, Odd Balls and players from the Amateur and International leagues all have stories to contribute to this book.

Not to be overlooked by his great artwork, is the quality stories Cieradowski offers the readers about all these unique and varied personalities.  His writing is both entertaining and informative and a few of them leave the reader wanting to go further and research more about certain players.  It is a great tool for a fans knowledge base.

This book is a fun and entertaining read and should not be overlooked.  It is not your average baseball compilation book in the fact that it is not packed full of stars.  It gives the lesser known players their due and appreciates their impact and contributions to the history of the game.  Check this book out, I don’t think you will be disappointed, because quite honestly there is something for everyone.

You can get this book from the nice folks at Touchstone

The League of Outsider Baseball

Happy Reading

Gregg

Black Baseball Entrepreneurs 1902-1931


The Negro Leagues offer an amazing amount of history to the Baseball fan.  They offer a history in length that rivals Major League Baseball, as well as offering up some incredible players.  Unfortunately due to poor record keeping and the social failings of our country, much of that history has been lost to time.  Now there is a book that helps unearth some more of the Negro League history, and fill in some of those up until now missing pieces.

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By:Michael E. Lomax – Syracuse University Press 2014

I will admit I screwed up on this one.  Michael Lomax wrote a book prior to this one that covered the earlier years of the Negro Leagues and should probably be read prior to this one, if only for continuity sake.  I have yet to get a hold of it but will at some point.

Michael Lomax has undertaken a pretty large and significant task of trying to piece the Negro League history back together during this era.  As has been noted before, their record keeping was not the greatest and the social ills that were present in our country at the time contributed to the lack of interest in keeping good records.  He has done a very nice job of showing the ins and outs of the league and the important players of the game both on and off the field.

The author shows how the league went from just an independent league that barely survived, to a structured powerhouse that held an important place in Negro society.  Its ascension within society,  in a way mirrored that of Major League Baseball.  Because of society’s rules, it always had to operate as organization lurking in the shadows and was forever barely on the fringe of legitimacy and financial solvency.

Students of the game and especially of the Negro Leagues will find this book very informative and helpful.  It provides great detail and probably some information that we may have not known before.  My one recommendation would be to read Lomax’s history books in order.  That way you maintain continuity throughout the entire history of the leagues.

You can get this book from the nice folks at Syracuse University Press.

http://www.syracuseuniversitypress.syr.edu

Happy Reading

Gregg