Tagged: texas rangers

Someone Interrupted My Baseball Blog!!!


It’s really no secret that I like baseball books.  Up until recently I spent all my waking moments reading them while not working.  The key part of that last sentence is “up until recently”.  Something has gotten in the way of my reading and writing time and significantly made me cut down on my posts.  Now I am realistic in the fact that probably no one other than a few publishers have noticed that I have not written much in the past two months and I realize there is not a single person out there thinking “Gosh, I miss Gregg’s amazing baseball book posts”.   But this being a project I enjoy doing, I figured I would offer some explanation of whats going on.  If you have followed this site over the last year, you have read about the forthcoming life changes, surgery and a trip that in the end was aborted for numerous reasons.  Several weeks back the biggest life change arrived and since that very moment nothing has been the same in any way, shape or form.

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Meet the newest bookworm-Aubrey Rose

This little munchkin is the reason for all the mayhem.  She arrived on August 18th (yes, I was reading Fastball John waiting for the delivery) and has disrupted our flow of life in so many wonderful ways.  She has cut into my reading time and destroyed anything resembling a good nights sleep, but my Wife Brina and I are loving it in so many amazing ways.

I have been working on her baseball book collection a few months before she arrived and thanks to Facebook friend Debby Brown, she received her first official Phillies book today. So her book collection is starting to come along very nicely.  She doesn’t know it yet but she is a Phillies fan.  Good or bad, that’s how this house rolls.  We have had lots of early morning feedings with the baseball game replaying on the TV in the dark and that manicured green grass gets her attention every time.  So I think we will have no problem raising another fan.

So how does this all tie into baseball books?  Well, I am glad you asked that very important question.  I have several review copies waiting for me on my desk, and to all, I just ask that you be patient.  I will not forget anyone, it may just take me longer than I had hoped to get some books done.  I did not realize how life changing, in a great way mind you, this addition to our family was really going to be.  Because quite honestly every time I try and read, this is the look  I get……………

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……….so it does slow me down a bit.  But I promise everyone who sent me a book, your time will come.  For those of you that have enjoyed this blog over the last two years I appreciate the support and look forward to many more books together.  Its my love of baseball books that brought me to do this blog and I have been lucky enough to make some great new friends along the way as well.

I have about 30 books on tap to get us through the Winter together, and hopefully Aubrey allows me a little more time to get them read.  Either that, or she learns how to read sooner rather than later so she can help me out on the reviews.

Wish me luck in figuring out parenthood.  The only thing I know for sure is she can not date until at least age 35!  Everything other than that is a work in progress ;).

Happy Reading

Gregg………and Aubrey too!

 

The Black Prince of Baseball-Hal Chase and the Mythology of the Game


Baseball likes to portray itself as the upholder of all that is right with the game.  The keeper of standards and arrow straight morals, and they want to remain steadfast in that regard through all time.  The most recent example of the high moral standard within Major League Baseball has been Pete Rose.  For the integrity of the game they think they should keep old Pete on the outside looking in to atone for his sins.  This has not been a new approach for Major League Baseball.  For about the past 100 years or so in an effort to clean up the game and install some confidence  with the general public they decided to clean house.  It all started with the Black Sox scandal and the 1919 World Series, but what about all the other problem children in the game before the Black Sox?  Today’s book takes a look at one of the larger than life problem athletes in the game at the time, who oh by the way was one of the best players in baseball history.

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By Donald Dewey & Nicholas Acocella-2016

This book is a re-issue of the volume originally released in 2004.  Hal Chase was one of the darlings of the diamond during his playing career.  A man who was friendly with gamblers and gangsters, regularly bet on games and was not a stranger to throwing a game or two.  One big thing to take note of is that Hal Chase was the scape-goat for bigger names than his who’s hands were much dirtier when the crap hit the fan.  You always hear about Shoeless Joe taking the fall for gambling but not so much about Hal Chase.

This book takes a very good luck at Chase’s life and gives the reader a real good feel of what baseball was really like at that time.  It shows in great detail that most if not all of the games had some shadow of not being on the level and that so many peoples hands were dirty it is not even funny.The book also does not miss the opportunity to showcase Hal Chase’s on the field skills.  Easily one of the best players to swing a bat and grab a glove up to that point.  Rated by Babe Ruth as one of the all-time greatest players, that is some serious praise to live up to.

This is a great book to get a real good feel of what baseball was like during this era.  It leaves no stone un-turned in showing the reader what Chase was really like and gives an honest look at what Ragtime baseball was all about.

Fans of this era will love this book.  If you are unfamiliar with the Ragtime era take the time to check it out because it is a great history lesson.  Finally, if you want to get another view of crooked baseball, other than the Black Sox scandal, this paints a pretty good picture of what was going on at that time.

You can get this book from the nice folks at the University of Nebraska Press

The Black Prince of Baseball

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

The Most Wonderful Week of the Year


Why are we baseball fans?  What draws you to the game?  Is it something tangible or is it a feeling you get from watching it?  Is it the same reason that it was when you were 13, 43 or 63 years old?  Obviously everyone will have a different answer and quite honestly there is no wrong answer.  One thing we all have in common is at one point in our lives, every single one of us wanted to be out on that field as a member of the pros.  That dream faded for many of us when we realized we had not one bit of talent to back it up.  Today’s book takes a look at one of the very few who were lucky enough to keep that little boy’s dream alive inside themselves, and while it may be 40 years behind his schedule it is still a monumental dream fulfilled.

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By Roy Berger-2014

Roy Berger is an average guy just like the rest of us.  Making a home, enjoying his family and friends and raising his kids to the best of his abilities.  But deep down inside he had that dream that to some degree we all still have, he wanted to be a major league baseball player.  While reality sets in for all of us when we realize we don’t have the ability to back up the dream, all of us like Roy never totally let go of that dream.  Being a Pittsburgh Pirates fan in his youth, the 50th anniversary of the 1960 World Series Champions led for a unique opportunity for Roy to make his dreams come true.

Fantasy Camps to me were always a toy for the rich fans.  The ability to hob-nob with the heroes of yesteryear and the chance to be shoulder to shoulder with them out on the battlefield.  Now while I still believe these are the tools of the affluent fan, this book shows us how much dedication one has to put into playing in a fantasy camp along with proving no matter what your financial status is in life, you can’t put a dollar sign on your dreams.

Roy Berger takes us on his journey through four Fantasy Camps.  He starts with his first true love the Pittsburgh Pirates celebrating the 50th anniversary of the 1960 team.  The Pittsburgh Pirates being the first love of his youth was a logical starting point and provided good value for the money.  He shows the reader how any fan might feel going into the first fantasy camp and it gives you a good feel for what these camps are all about.  It also shows how addictive the game of baseball really is to true lifetime fans.

His second year he takes us on tour with the Detroit Tigers.  The combination of rain delays and cancellations at that camp plus the fact that he had no real attachment to the Detroit Tigers led to his worst experience of all the visits.  It was the lowest price of all the camps he attended and proves the adage you get what you pay for.   This trip also showed that even though he was a player in his late 50’s that he still treated the game with respect and went through the needed preparation to give it his best.

His third year, 2012, Roy takes us to his adult adopted team, the New York Yankees fantasy camp.  The highest priced of all the camps, because its the Yankees and they can do it, it offered the most amenities along with the opportunities to hob nob with the most players. An overall great experience both on and off the field, the only downside of course was the price.

Roy’s final fantasy camp took us back to the Pirates, which to me seems to be the best value of all the camps he attended.  A combination of on field injuries and Father Time catching up with Roy made this his poorest performance at any of the camps and lowest showing in the camps final standings for any of the teams he had been on.

This book is a great example of how no matter how old we are, we never can outgrow that little kid inside of each of us that wants to play baseball.  I find it amazing that grown men will pay thousands of dollars for a week of playing baseball with some of their heroes.  It is also the opportunity for grown men and women to create new friendships that endure year to year.  Without doubt this is very a unique opportunity and one that price will ever forbid me from partaking in, and at any age, but if I could afford it I would most certainly go.

Roy’s book does a great job of showing the reader what one goes through in a Fantasy Camp.  It is not just show up and play ball, because at our age (over 40) most of our bodies would just laugh at us if we tried that.  He shows the preparation and dedication required to play  and the most important what it takes to not look like an idiot in front of your heroes.  It shows that no matter how old we get, as long as you can write the check,  baseball will always keep us young at heart.

If you have any sort of inner child this book is great for you.  It will show you where baseball may lead you if you always stay true to both yourself and the game.  You can get this book direct from Roy Berger himself.

The Most Wonderful Week of the Year

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

Skipper Supreme-Buck Showalter and the Baltimore Orioles


Managers are an interesting breed.  Their job security is virtually non-existent from the day they are hired, and they are second guessed on a regular basis.  No matter what moves they make on the field, someone in the stands, on the team or in the front office will disagree with them.  Like with most things in life, the cream of the crop usually rises to the top and Buck Showalter is no exception.  Everywhere he has managed he has had some sort of measured success, but has never been able to make it all the way to the World Series.  His most recent stop with the Baltimore Orioles to date has been without a doubt successful and will more than likely get him his ring.  Today’s book takes a look at the methods, both on and off the field, that have brought the Orioles out of the basement of the A.L. East.

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By: Todd Karpovich & Jeff Seidel – 2016

Skipper Supreme takes the reader through a journey that Orioles fans are ecstatic that they have been able to be a part of.  It shows how Buck Showalter’s people skills and feel for the game have rebuilt a franchise that was bottom feeding for a long time.  Much like fans of the Pittsburgh Pirates, the people in Baltimore were desperate for some light at the end of Camden Yards and with Buck at the helm the finally got one.

This book shows reader step by step how methodically Baltimore has re-built themselves into a serious contender.  How through strong historical values, smart personnel moves and a little luck, this group of players have breathed life back into the city of Baltimore.  The Orioles are the poster children for a good mix between old school baseball thinking and new school metrics.

If you are a fan of the Orioles, this book is right up your alley.  99% of the book is about the O’s march back to respectability.  If you are looking for a full-on autobiography on Buck Showalter you will be disappointed.  They don’t in any detail touch on his time with the New York Yankees, Arizona Diamondbacks or Texas Rangers.  They are mentioned in passing but nothing of great substance.  This book is all Baltimore …..all the time.

Considering the authors are both Baltimore writers I get the reasoning as to why the book is this way.  It is their hometown civic pride shining through.  The Orioles finally have a team worth talking about and they don’t want them getting lost in the story lines of the larger market teams.  Buck Showalter should be highly commended for his turnaround of that franchise and the authors do a very nice job of giving him and his players the credit they deserve.  Orioles fans will enjoy their time spent reading this book, without question. Now next, I would like to see someone write a true Buck Showalter biography and give us some more details about the Skipper Supreme.

You can get this book from the nice folks at Sports Publishing

Skipper Supreme

 

Lucky Me-My 65 Years in Baseball


Baseball lifers are a tough breed.  When you find one in this day and age, look at what they have witnessed.  They have seen the game go from small wages and managements sole control to a strong players union and skyrocketing salaries.  They have seen stadiums come and go, the passing of legends and friends as well as their game becoming a big business.  On the flip side of all this, baseball lifers have the opportunity to share some great stories.  Today’s book is no exception to the fact that there are lots of stories just waiting to be told.

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By: Eddie Robinson and C. Paul Rogers III 2015

This book is a re-issue of the book that first came out from another publisher in 2011.  Eddie Robinson walks you through his baseball career, first as a player and then as a general manager in the major leagues.  He has been witness to some great moments in baseball history from both sides of the fence.  He also states that he has never worked a day in his life, because he has been lucky enough to be involved in the game he dearly loves.

Robinson takes you through his playing career, overcoming challenges to make his dreams come true and become a big league player.  He was blessed enough played in an era with some of the games all-time greats and was able to have his career coincide with great moments in history.  He had a respectable career that would make any mother proud, it was by far not Hall of Fame worthy, but he still achieved his dreams.

After his playing career ended, Robinson entered the business side of baseball.  Most notably becoming general Manager for both the Texas Rangers and Atlanta Braves.  He tells some great stories of happenings at each stop and again he got to witness some great things such as Hank Aaron’s 715th Home Run.  If you could have a charmed life as a General Manager, this may just be it.

One thing I could not shake with this book the entire time I was reading it was Robinson’s attitude.  While telling stories about his playing career, I almost got the feeling that Eddie thought he was much better than the world ever gave him credit for.  Essentially he felt that he was slighted because of the era he played in because it contained so many great players.  This vibe carried over into his General Managers days and for me it just put a negative feel to some parts of the book.  By far this is not a bad book, I just felt uncomfortable as the stories progressed, mainly because Robinson always seemed to feel slighted in some way.

Fans regardless of the team allegiance will enjoy this book.  It is a lot of stories from baseball’s golden age as well as stories from the years baseball underwent great changes.  There are no earth shattering stories, just a basic autobiography from someone who has really enjoyed his multi-faceted life within the game of baseball.

You can get this book from the nice folks at the University of Nebraska Press

Lucky Me

Happy Reading

Gregg