Tagged: st martins press

Baseball Fascinations-Holiday Edition


Baseball is a game that offers something for everyone.  It caters to varying tastes and personalities, while offering satisfaction for everyone who enjoys the game.  Each person wants to experience the game on their own terms and get whatever level of enjoyment that satisfies them personally, and that is perfectly alright with the baseball gods.  Tim Kurkjian has spent his professional life following baseball and has once again given us more reasons to love the game we all enjoy.

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By:Tim Kurkjian-2016

I’m Fascinated by Sacrifice Flies offers a unique look at various aspects of the game of baseball.  From sounds and rules to superstitions and various quirks, this book gives the reader a glimpse behind the curtain of the mental part of the game itself off the field.    It is not something you find often in a baseball book authored by a game reporter.

Under no circumstances is this book to be considered heavy lifting in the literary realm.  It is a light and breezy book that moves the reader through the anecdotes quickly.  Some of the stories you may recognize as having been mentioned in other books, but they still fit nicely within the confines of this book.  If you are looking for a strong literary masterpiece you came to the wrong place with this one, but it really does lend it self to an enjoyable and relaxing afternoon of reading.  I mean really where else would we find out why Pete Rose left federal prison and went right to a batting cage.

I tend to shy away from books like this because I don’t always trust what I am getting from certain other authors.  With Tim Kurkjian I always get what I expect from his books.  His enthusiasm and love of the game always shine through and make the stories enjoyable and add some extra credence to them as well.

Like I said above, there is no heavy lifting with this one.  And quite honestly, as many books as I read in a year, a book like this is welcome sight.  It reminds the reader of the fun and quirky side of the game as opposed to the big business and on high stress persona it portrays so often.  It also gives the mind a break while allowing me to still stay in the baseball realm.

Check it out I don’t think you will be disappointed.  It is honestly a couple hours well spent with your favorite sport.

You can get this book from the nice folks at St. Martins Press

I’m Fascinated by Sacrifice Flies

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

 

 

 

 

 

Game 7, 1986-Failure and Triumph in the Biggest Game of My Life


I think I am a fairly ordinary guy.  Growing older somewhat gracefully, as my inner child slowly calms down.  I think a by-product of growing older is your memory is not as great as it used to be.  If you asked me what I ate for breakfast a few days ago, I may have trouble giving you the correct answer.  Another side effect of the passage of time on the memory is nostalgia.  You may romanticize things and enjoy them much more today than you actually did thirty years ago.  In the last few years there have been books published that dissect a game from several decades prior, inning by inning and pitch by pitch, which leads to my first of many questions.  How do players remember everything that happened during a specific game, every thought process, every tobacco spit and every sneer at an opposing player.  If you ask why am I asking such a silly question, please see the sentence above about my breakfast.  Anyhow, today’s book follows this same format about game seven of one of the most dramatic World Series in recent memory.

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By:Ron Darling-2016

The 1986 World Series without a doubt was full of plenty of drama.  From the New York Mets trek to the big dance via Houston, to Bill Buckner making himself a footnote in baseball history, 1986 is a hard one to forget.  Ron Darling on most other baseball pitching staffs would have easily been the Ace, but on the Mets he was in the shadows of one phenom, namely Dwight Gooden.  Nonetheless Darling was the arm on tap to pitch Game 7 of the 1986 World Series.  Most people forget that the Buckner error was in Game 6 which then led to needing to play a game 7.

Ron Darling has made a nice little post pitching career for himself being a baseball analyst for both the Mets and the MLB Network.  He has great natural insight into the game and always explains the nuances to the fans so that the get a full understanding of the issues at hand.  Darling takes the same approach in his new book.

He takes the reader through Game 7 inning by inning, explaining the thought process used in his pitches as well as what was going on around him.  You see how the pitcher Ron Darling was processing the events of the day, but he also shows how the person Ron Darling was interpreting it as well.  It gives a real good rendition of the players take on what happened in Game 7, from a person who was on an emotional see-saw the entire evening.

Darling also gives a little glimpse of his personal life as well as some takes on his New York teammates.  It is not an in-depth analysis of his fellow Mets but it certainly gives the reader a behind the scenes glimpse of the team.

The question still sticks in my mind, how do you remember this much vivid detail 30 years later?  Admittedly he used some video footage to “refresh” his memory, but I still find it hard to accept these types of books as 100% credible.  Time easily distorts things even with the aide of video tape.  It also seems to some degree Ron darling is apologizing for his pitching performance but does seem to take the attitude of “I am sure glad we won, even though I sucked”.

This book is an enjoyable and quick read.  It flows smoothly and if Ron Darling is remembering correctly, gives the reader some great detail into Game 7.  It was a World Series to remember and all baseball fans will enjoy reliving this one special game.

You can get this book from the nice folks at St. Martins Press

Game 7, 1986

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

Throwback-A Big-League Catcher Tells How the Game is Really Played


The baseball book market has offered readers tens of thousands of options.  No matter what you prefer, history, biography, or fiction there is a book out there for everyone.  The down side to all those options is you can also find books that are pointless. Something that was published to capitalize on someones current popularity, targeting an audience of fair-weather fans who know about the subject because it’s a hot topic.  You can also find books that are published just because they played the game.  No real increase in the knowledge beyond the average fan, but still published because they have a marketable name.  Today’s book falls in to that category of I am a baseball player so I am smarter than everyone else.

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By:Jason Kendall-St. Martins Press 2014

I went into this book thinking I was going to get some baseball insight along with a mix of autobiography.  What I got was a book that told me how smart Jason Kendall is.  It was basically his version of what happens at each position during a game and why these things happen.   The information that Kendall gives the reader is basic strategy that the average fan to some degree already knows.

The writing style feels like Kendall is talking down to you.  It gives the feeling that he thinks he is some sort of baseball savant and enlightening the world with his knowledge.  From a personal level you get nothing substantial about him.  You learn he hates autograph seekers, but in the end really nothing in detail.

I was pretty disappointed with this book.  I had hoped for more, but there was nothing that required the reader to stop and think about.  It was one players interpretation of basic baseball.  For Jason Kendall, I guess he takes personal information seriously, and as such he keeps his story private.

You can make your own determination, but I think this book may be one fans should pass on.  There are many other options from St Martins Press worth spending your money on.  But readers should make the call.

You can check this one and a bunch of good titles at http://www.stmartins.com

Happy Reading

Gregg

Split Season 1981 – The year that changed everything


1981 was somewhat of a transition year for America.  Disco was dead, the Phillies were after 97 years, reigning World Series Champions and old school baseball was changing.  The recent advent of free agency in the second half of the last decade was making wholesale changes to the way the old school owners conducted business.  Those same changes were leading to the selling of teams and making dollar signs bounce around like super balls.  Some of it was for the betterment of the game, but it was driving the old guard nuts.  After a few years of tumultuous relations between the players union and MLB, the season became fractured due to a players strike that would never leave baseball the same.

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By:Jeff Katz-St. Martins Press 2015

The events of 1981 have always needed some clarification for me.  I have never quite understood what the basis of the strike was other than money.  Now, I am totally clear as to what the issues were and why the issues at hand were worth fighting for.

Jeff Katz has created to me essentially the bible of the 1981 season.  He takes an in-depth look at the labor issues leading up to the 1981 players strike and what the players felt needed to improve.  He discusses the issues both on and off the field in 1981 and how the strike effected everyone and everything.  He also paints an overall picture of the state of relations between players and owners after the advent of free agency.

A large portion of this book obviously centers on the strike itself.  Katz takes the reader on a journey of all the events that happened in negotiations and you get to see the key players and negotiators at work.  The authors account is a painstaking journey through the legal avenues traveled within Major League Baseball.  It gives insight to the strike and negotiations that I have never seen before.  It helps clarify to the reader that the players were not just a bunch of money hungry thieves that were looking for a big score.  They had legitimate complaints that needed to be addressed by the owners in the changing ways in which MLB now needed to function.  The book also shows the owners side of the table and in the end, the were fumbling bunch of idiots that harmed their own cause in the end.

Jeff Katz has created a great book that is a very enjoyable read that moves along quickly.  Even though a large portion of the book is off-field events, it keeps the reader’s interest and makes you not want to put it down.  All baseball fans should enjoy this book.  You can see how your favorite team and a few star players fared during the strike and at the negotiation table.

You can pick up this book from the nice folks at St. Martins Press

http://www.stmartins.com

Happy Reading

Gregg