Tagged: Shoeless Joe Jackson

Bring In the Right-Hander!


Sometimes I find a baseball autobiography and wonder if this player really needed their own book.  If that player had an average, or even less than average career, what could they possibly bring to the table?  Sometimes I get a pleasant surprise when one of those average player writes a book that holds my interest and produces a good reading experience for me.  Today’s book falls into that pleasant surprise category and from an unlikely source to boot.

Reuss-Book-University-of-Nebraska-Press

By:Jerry Reuss-2014

Jerry Reuss by most standards had an average career.  Never the ace of a staff, but a serviceable arm that would eat innings and help teams in their push to the top.  Pitching for eight teams over a 22 year span, Reuss compiled an impressive win total of 220.  From a pitcher that never won more than 18 games in any given season,  that is an impressive total.

Jerry Reuss starts the reader on a journey through his early years in Missouri, where he first dreamed of becoming a major league pitcher.  Signing with the hometown St. Louis Cardinals, Reuss had all the makings of  a real life dream come true.

Reuss then shows the reader what the inside, off the field life of a baseball player is really like.  Back stabbings by the upper management people he trusted, trades, releases and other not so pleasant things a player deals with on an annual basis.  It shows how much more players even back in those days had to deal with off the field.

The big thing I took away from this book is how remaining true to yourself and dealing fair with people will help you get ahead at whatever your vocation.  Jerry Reuss played more years than many of his contemporaries did who maintained the same skill set.  It comes across as being a combination of perseverance at his chosen trade and being a decent person on and off the field.  In the end this average pitcher ended his career, after a few stops in different cities, the proud owner of a World Series ring.

This book is a pretty enjoyable read.  It moves along at a brisk pace and holds the readers interest through more than just on the field happenings.  Anecdotes about himself and teammates keep you engaged and give you a real feel what it was like to be a teammate of Reuss’.  It also shows a glimpse of the personality of Reuss himself which comes across as a fun loving guy and a great teammate.

If you are a fan of Reuss or any of the teams he played for, take the time to read this book.  It is not a book that one would compare to War & Peace in any way.  It is more of a breezy light hearted read of an average pitcher with an interesting journey.  I wasn’t expecting much out of Reuss’  stories about his career and his teammates, but was pleasantly surprised at what I got.  You never know who or what is going to present you with an enjoyable book.

You can get this book from the nice folks at the University of Nebraska Press

Bring In the Right-Hander!

Happy Reading

Gregg

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The Black Prince of Baseball-Hal Chase and the Mythology of the Game


Baseball likes to portray itself as the upholder of all that is right with the game.  The keeper of standards and arrow straight morals, and they want to remain steadfast in that regard through all time.  The most recent example of the high moral standard within Major League Baseball has been Pete Rose.  For the integrity of the game they think they should keep old Pete on the outside looking in to atone for his sins.  This has not been a new approach for Major League Baseball.  For about the past 100 years or so in an effort to clean up the game and install some confidence  with the general public they decided to clean house.  It all started with the Black Sox scandal and the 1919 World Series, but what about all the other problem children in the game before the Black Sox?  Today’s book takes a look at one of the larger than life problem athletes in the game at the time, who oh by the way was one of the best players in baseball history.

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By Donald Dewey & Nicholas Acocella-2016

This book is a re-issue of the volume originally released in 2004.  Hal Chase was one of the darlings of the diamond during his playing career.  A man who was friendly with gamblers and gangsters, regularly bet on games and was not a stranger to throwing a game or two.  One big thing to take note of is that Hal Chase was the scape-goat for bigger names than his who’s hands were much dirtier when the crap hit the fan.  You always hear about Shoeless Joe taking the fall for gambling but not so much about Hal Chase.

This book takes a very good luck at Chase’s life and gives the reader a real good feel of what baseball was really like at that time.  It shows in great detail that most if not all of the games had some shadow of not being on the level and that so many peoples hands were dirty it is not even funny.The book also does not miss the opportunity to showcase Hal Chase’s on the field skills.  Easily one of the best players to swing a bat and grab a glove up to that point.  Rated by Babe Ruth as one of the all-time greatest players, that is some serious praise to live up to.

This is a great book to get a real good feel of what baseball was like during this era.  It leaves no stone un-turned in showing the reader what Chase was really like and gives an honest look at what Ragtime baseball was all about.

Fans of this era will love this book.  If you are unfamiliar with the Ragtime era take the time to check it out because it is a great history lesson.  Finally, if you want to get another view of crooked baseball, other than the Black Sox scandal, this paints a pretty good picture of what was going on at that time.

You can get this book from the nice folks at the University of Nebraska Press

The Black Prince of Baseball

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

Tales From the Deadball Era-Some of the Wildest Times in Baseball History


Nostalgia is a dangerous thing.  If not used correctly it can skew the memories of people, times and places of bygone eras.  It can make one think and long for something that in hindsight we believe was much better than it really was.  Since Baseball has been around for almost a century and a half, there are many eras that none of use were able to witness first hand.  We rely on history books, the research of many and documentation to see what really happened.  The Deadball era is one that many people have a fondness for and like to learn about it as much as they can.  I recently found a book that allows those Deadball era lovers to get some inside stories of what the game was really like during that time, without succumbing to all that messy nostalgia.

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By: Mark Halfon – 2014

Tales From the Deadball Era allows readers to do some time traveling if you will.  It takes them back to when violence, segregation and gambling were some of the nicer things happening at the baseball games.  A time when fields were in disrepair, equipment was unsophisticated and quite honestly the final product was somewhat of a mess.  It was nothing like the showcase we get to witness on a daily basis today.

Halfon introduces us to some of the major events of the era.  Showing us these highlights along with some of the great personalities ever to play the game, he gives the reader a very complete picture of what was going on during this era.  He also shows some of the more lighthearted moments that infiltrated the game during that period.  Many of these things you would not even dream of as being part of the game today.  The book also shows how necessity is the mother of invention.  Things we normally accept as part of the game had to come from somewhere, and this book shows us those things we should all be thankful for.

If you fancy yourself a novice baseball historian this book is a good book for you.  It gives the reader a nice feel for this time period and will leave you wanting to find out more information about the Deadball era and its personalities.  If you fancy yourself a novice historian on the John Thorn level then you may want to stay away from this one.  If you are at that level you more than likely wont get any new information from this book.  Honestly most fans will enjoy reading this book and spending the time traveling back to these decades long ago.

You can get this book from the nice folks at Potomac Books

Tales From the Deadball Era

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

The Betrayal – The 1919 World Series and the Birth of Modern Baseball


It’s that time of year where the playoffs are in full swing and the World Series is right around the corner.  With the events over the next few weeks looming it is a time to write another chapter in the history books as well as reflecting on past seasons.  The World Series has always been a source of great memories, as well as a few not so great moments.  Some of those not so great moments have helped shape the game we all know today.  The biggest one that has a World Series tie-in is the 1919 Black Sox scandal.  It is an event that shook baseball to its core and todays book takes a hard look at what really happened almost 100 years ago.

By: Charles Fountain - 2015

By: Charles Fountain – 2015

The 1919 White Sox were approached by gamblers to throw the World Series.  Just about every baseball fan is familiar with the story, but its lasting effects have been felt throughout the game for almost a century.  This particular series brought gambling to the forefront in baseball and essentially destroyed almost all of the credibility the game had with the general public.  It also made the scape goat of the series Shoeless Joe Jackson a household name for generations to come.

Charles Fountain takes a new and refreshing approach to the Black Sox scandal.  The author removes the Hollywood glamorization of the Black Sox scandal and gives the reader the actual facts about what happened.  He looks at the events from players, management and the gamblers aspects and paints a vivid picture for the readers of actual events.  The details are so good in this book the reader can almost get the feeling they are a fly on the wall when all of this takes place.  It does clarify some of the details that may have gotten blurred through the passage of time.

There are other books out there that take a look at the 1919 Black Sox scandal.  Some do a good job and some take poetic license if you will and blur the details.  Thankfully, this one falls into the prior category and is one of the better books on the market.  It forces the reader to look at the details objectively and to form some of their own opinions.  The one interesting aspect is that you can see where the events helped transform todays game into what it is.  You can see how leagues changed and the end result was the American League we now know.

For fans who fancy themselves novice historians of the game, this book will be eye-opening and enjoyable.  Pete Rose might even want to take a look at this one because he can see all the events that led up to the rules that banished him from baseball.  It’s nice to see a book with fresh perspective almost a full century after the fact.

You can get this book from the nice folks at Oxford University Press

The Betrayal-The 1919 World Series and the Birth of Modern Baseball

Happy Reading

Gregg