Tagged: shameful victory

Shameful Victory-The L.A. Dodgers, the Red Scare and the Hidden History of Chavez Ravine


The more books I read, the more I think almost everybody is a baseball fan.  It seems to touch everyone on some level and if they chose to admit it or not, is their prerogative.  I have come across books in the past with an agenda of a very serious topic that also has some sort of baseball spin to them.  These books usually put on display a great social injustice in a specific area, but to date I have not come across one that spells out the governmental backstabbing one specific community had to endure.    Today’s book was found by a recommendation from a Facebook friend (thanks Debby!) and I was not disappointed in the least.

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By: John Laslett 2015

This books intended audience I believe was not to be considered a baseball book.  Its original purpose was to show the social injustice that the Mexican community had to endure at the hands of the Los Angeles city government.  Essentially they destroyed a tight knit community in the name of social progress and urban development.  Change like that was to some degree inevitable in every big city during the post World War II era and Los Angeles was no exception.  By destroying the Chavez Ravine community the city created numerous economic and social disasters that plagued that area for decades.

Most of the property the city claimed was through short purchase and eminent domain in the name of housing developments.  In the end those housing developments never came to be, and the land was eventually used for other purposes.  In case you haven’t figured it out, this is where the Dodgers come in to play and acquired their space to build Dodger Stadium.  It shows the numerous back room deals that benefited Walter O’ Malley and the Dodgers franchise, all while backstabbing a community.  It really shows the darker side of moving baseball to the west coast.

The book is a very thoughtful and insightful case study of Los Angeles politics during this time period.  It also shows the scarier side of city politics and how as fans we don’t always see the dark side of the baseball business dealings.  The book is not entirely a baseball product, but it does have enough content to hold a fans interest throughout the entire book .  For those who think Walter O’Malley was a hero for bringing baseball west may really want to check this book out, because it really sheds a different light on the entire process.

You can get this book from the nice folks at The University of Arizona Press

Shameful Victory

Happy Reading

Gregg