Tagged: Segregation

Jackie Robinson In Quotes


Jackie Robinson’s legacy is well known, so there is no need for me to lay it out there for everyone.  Perhaps he has had the single greatest social impact on the game during his life and after it as well.  Regardless of his legacy, Jackie Robinson has had a serious amount of articles and books written about him. Danny Peary has put together a book that is a compilation of Jackie Robinson quotes.  It introduces a new and interesting way to see the profound impact Robinson made on the game.

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By:Danny Peary-2016

Danny Peary’s book follows a unique path as far as a book goes.  The format falls in line with his other book Derek Jeter In Quotes.   Both of the books paint an interesting picture of their subjects.  The Jackie Robinson volume draws from books, player and manager interviews, newspaper articles, historians and some quotes from Jackie himself.  It allows the author to show a more intimate portrait of Robinson that a simple one dimension biography is unable to display.

Danny Peary’s books are always enjoyable to read and this one is no exception.  The other books he has collaborated on are thoroughly researched and the subjects are accurately portrayed to the reader.  This book is no exception to his past works and the new format he has with the quotes make it a very enjoyable read.  You get both a feel for Robinson as well as the person making the quote.  So in essence you are getting more than one perspective in this format.

I said it about the Derek Jeter In Quotes book and it carries true on the Jackie Robinson volume as well, this is a welcome change from the standard baseball player autobiography. Quite honestly when you read several different books in a year, you embrace a change and really enjoy something out of the ordinary.  Fans should check this out because I can almost guarantee if you think you know everything about Jackie Robinson, you don’t.  This book will surely give you some new information to add to your Jackie Robinson arsenal.  Check it out I do not think you will be disappointed.

Jackie Robinson In Quotes

Happy Reading

Gregg

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When Baseball Went White


Baseball as it exists today is the way many of have always known it our entire lives.  One of those things many of us have not experienced is racial segregation on the field,  just the best players the world has to offer playing the game we all love.   Events of the last 70 years or so have provided the opportunity for all races to play Major League Baseball and effectively end the color line within the game.  But the question has arisen as to where the segregation agreement came from.  Obviously it would be a problem in the South to have mixed races on the field, but in Northern cities it may have been a non-issue.  So when and why did this so called gentleman’s agreement come to be and for what reasoning?  Today’s book takes a look at the source of the agreement and its underlying purpose.

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By: Ryan Swanson-2014

Ryan Swanson takes a look at Reconstruction Era baseball right after the Civil War.  He looks at how the constructors of the game had the desire to make it appeal to the masses as a national game.  The thought was that it would help heal some of the wounds from the Civil War and attempt to make a nation whole again.  The author pays special attention to the cities of Philadelphia, Richmond and Washington D.C., because of the large amounts of African-American residents in each city.  The theory of the book would apply to the entire league but the residential make-up of the other cities were much different at the time.

The book offers some really intense research by its author to get 19th century baseball game information.  In the end it gives the reader the notion that the reasoning behind segregating the game was  to foster national appeal.  By segregating it they would have no backlash from the southern states and would be able to accelerate the acceptance by the masses of baseball being the national game.

Quite honestly I do not have enough knowledge of this era of baseball to give a positive or negative opinion on the authors findings.  So for that matter I am accepting them at face value.  Without this agreement in place it may have in turn stunted the growth of the game itself in the eyes of Americans.  But on the flip side of that coin is the fact that so many great players were denied the right to play Major League Baseball and toiled in the Negro Leagues for so long.  One could only imagine what the record books would look like today if there was an even playing field among the races from day one.

For myself, the book read a little dry, more like an encyclopedia instead of a story. It also would have been nice to see the effects this action would have had on a more in-depth basis, as opposed to just Philadelphia, Richmond and Washington D.C..

If you don’t have an deep interest in this era of baseball history, you may want to pass on this one.  It honestly is a little dry and you may have trouble finishing it.  If you have an interest in Reconstruction Era baseball, this will help fill in some of the missing pieces from a very influential era of the game.

You can get this book from the nice folks at the University of Nebraska Press

When Baseball Went White

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

The Rise and Fall of Dodgertown – 60 Years of Baseball in Vero Beach


Teams that have been in existence for a long time have great histories.  It is inevitable that through the passage of time some neat things are going to happen and in turn create some great traditions.  The Dodgers are one such team that have that long and storied tradition.  Being part of the national pastime almost from the beginning, they have created some wonderful memories through the years as well as leaving their mark on the great game we all love.  One such tradition was Vero Beach, Florida.  The spring training home of the Dodgers for decades, they basically made that town their own little world.  Today’s book takes a look at the mark the Dodgers left on that sleepy little town in Florida.

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By: Rody Johnson-2008

Vero Beach in the 1940’s was a sleepy quiet little town in Florida, at least until the Dodgers arrived.  Looking to save a buck and avoid segregation issues the Dodgers created their own little complex on a vacated military base.  The idea of doing that at the time was unheard of, but does show how the Dodgers liked to not always follow tradition.  It allowed for all the players to stay in one location and form a bond as a team, that none of the others had.

Rody Johnson has written a book that chronicles the entire existence of the Dodgers in Vero Beach.  From their first spring at the crude facility through the end when the Dodgers folded their tent and moved to Arizona, you see what became Dodgertown.  The book shows you how the Dodgers remodeled and expanded their facility through the years and how the local government was effected both by the Dodgers and other businesses that called Vero home.  It also shows the results of the growth of Vero Beach had, because the Dodgers called that town home.  Being more than a spring training complex you also get to see the operations the Dodgers had there pretty much year round that helped the economy of the area grow.

This is an in-depth book that shows how a team that you really only thought of as a spring training tenant really was a participant in the town all year.  If you are not familiar with the Dodgers spring training operations, as I wasn’t, you will be surprised at the magnitude of their facility.  It was called Dodgertown for a reason, and this book shows the reader that it really was warranted.

Dodgers fans will enjoy it as well as all baseball fans.  It shows a cool operation that was a big part of the teams history, and the likes of something we may never see again of this magnitude.

You can get this book from the nice folks at the University Press of Florida

http://upf.com/book.asp?id=JOHNSS08

Happy Reading

Gregg

Long Taters-A Biography of George Scott


It’s funny how a baseball book can scratch the surface but never quite get all the way through.  With biographies that seems to be especially true.  For reasons unknown, perhaps shame, emotional reasons, or whatever some guys just never will give up the whole story.  As writers and interviewees they have every right to do so, but in the end, it always leaves questions in the reader’s mind.  Baseball players play an intricate part in the fans life. You spend 8 plus months following a player each year.  Stats, stories, news and dramatic plays all find their way into our daily lives.  So its only natural to want to know as much about your favorite players as possible.  Unfortunately even after they publish a book you may not get all your answers.  For me today’s book left me with some unanswered questions.

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By:Ron Anderson-McFarland 2012

I have always felt the George Scott was underrated. Possibly because of some of the teams he played on and being overshadowed by his own teammates. Maybe it was the fact he had the same type of relationship with the media that Dick Allen had, and that effected his popularity.  Regardless of the reason I never felt Boomer got his due.   Due to that fact, you never really felt you knew or understood George Scott as well as some of the other players on the team.  Ron Anderson has finally given the world a book that helps people understand and appreciate George Scott.  The author did some serious homework with this book.  Compiling interviews with Scott himself and countless friends, family and even some enemies, he has been able to portray a side of the man we never saw on the field.

From Scott’s beyond poor upbringing in segregated and violent Mississippi, his struggles to reach the major leagues and make it with the Boston Red Sox, you see a portrait of what made the man.  Events that helped guide his life and molded his personality.  You see daily struggles that he had to over come just because of the color of his skin and how those struggles effected him all of his days.  You also see confrontations that were a result of all of these issues.

When you think of great sluggers, George Scott does not jump into a lot of people’s minds.  He did have a very solid 14 year career and put up some pretty healthy numbers.  This book does give some insight into the man, his career and events that unfolded before and during baseball that both helped and hurt him.  The only part I would have liked to see is more about his life after baseball, off-seasons and more on a personal level.  It did not lack in giving George the credit he deserved in any way.  He finally got his due, it just felt like some part of the complete story of Boomer’s life may have been omitted.  Perhaps by accident or by design,  but in the end I still felt a little void.

Baseball fans of all teams will enjoy this one.  You get a chance to relive a career that most times gets forgotten.

You can get this book from the nice folks at McFarland Publishing

http://www.mcfarlandpub.com

Happy Reading

Gregg