Tagged: seattle mariners

Who Gets a Book-Part II


I asked this question on another post recently and received a litany of great answers.  I am well aware that there really is no criteria to who gets a book, but each of us has their own criteria of what really merits a book.  I for one am not here to pass along my thoughts on the subject because each of us has different views and it becomes a personal choice more than anything else.  I found two books recently that come from two ends of the spectrum on the field, but give the reader a very similar product in the end.

Ralph Mauriello and Ron Fairly have several things in common.  Most notably they are both Dodgers Alumni, and I have noticed the feeling of once a Dodger, always a Dodger.  But their careers took very different paths throughout the years.  While Mauriello had a short stint with the Major League team, he spent the majority of his playing years toiling in the minors, while Fairly put a couple of decades at the big league level with a few different stops around the league.  Now with such different playing careers and reaching different levels of success you would thing the end resulting books of their lives would be wildly different.  I am glad to say that could not be further from the truth.

Now that is not to say that both books are mirror images, but there are certain important qualities that shine through.  They both share their life and career experiences for the reader which helps give a well-rounded view of what they offered on the field.  This comes in especially helpful those readers that may not have been around during their playing days, it paints a picture in your mind of what baseball was like for each author as they made their way along their unique journey.  Both books also illustrate what great men both players were, the humility they had, both on and off the field and the honor it was for both of them to be part of the game they loved.  Family is also an important factor in both men’s lives and it is showcased very clearly in both books.  Finally, both books show what life is like after you are off the field.  While both men have taken very different paths in life you can see the underlying love of the game and the immense pride they both had to be on that field.

When I asked the who deserves a book question previously I thought I had a better handle on the answer .  Today I realize if you have a story to tell, no matter what their contribution to the game was, it’s a story worth telling.  It’s up to the readers to decide which stories that they want to read and what they find worthy of their time.  If it is a 20 year veteran or a cup of coffe player, they still have a lot to offer the readers.   For my money these both books make the cut.

If you like the Dodgers and the early years of California baseball, along with a spattering of stories about celebrities and baseball royalty then these books would be for you.  They both tell great stories throughout flow very nicely and you get two different views of the Once a Dodger Always a Dodger tag.

You can get these great books at the following links:

Ralph Mauriello

Ron Fairly

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

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Odds & Ends-Spring 2018 Edition


As we sit here today, Opening Day is only five short days away.  I find that very hard to believe since I am sitting here watching a foot and a half of snow that came three days ago, melt out the window, but I am sure the baseball scheduling Gods have that all figured out.  The Spring edition of Odds and Ends is upon us and while everything we look at today may not be a 2018 new season release, they are still solid books to help the reader wander through the new baseball year.

 

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Ronald T. Waldo always takes on somewhat obscure era’s and subjects for his books.  It is a good thing because Waldo always shows the reader an almost forgotten era in baseball and brings prominent names back to the forefront.  I like Waldo’s books because his thorough research always shines through in the book and you can rely on the accuracy of the stories he tells the reader.  If you have any sort of interest in 1920’s baseball or want to use this book as a history lesson for yourself, than this book is definitely one you should check out.  You can get this one from the friendly folks at Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.

 

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Staying in the same era of baseball, what more can I say about this book that hasn’t already been said.  It has won numerous awards since its release last year and quite honestly deserves every one of them.  Steinberg has done a phenomenal job bringing the life and career of Urban Shocker to the modern day fan.  It gives the reader a glimpse of what baseball was like during that timeframe and makes you realize how even though we are still essentially playing the same game, times have changed dramatically.  For those with an interest in players of the past, the New York Yankees and several other aspects this book presents to the reader, it is worth checking out.  It offers so many levels of information that you will be glad you took the time to read it.  You can get this one from the nice folks at the University of Nebraska Press.

 

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There have been a few books written by, or about Lou in the past.  For my money, this one is the best of the bunch.  It is updated through the end of his managerial career and into retirement and really gets you to the personal side of Lou Piniella.  It covers his full life and is not really specifically team focused.  It goes through everywhere he stopped during his playing and managing days and really doesn’t pull any punches.  He is telling it like he sees it at this point.  Other books on Lou have been more team or time frame focused, so this one really shows it all.  If you have read the other books, there may be some overlap of information on certain teams but for the grand picture of a career this is your best bet.  Yu can get this one from the nice folks at Harper Collins Publishers.

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If you have a Yankees book, you should always follow it with a Red Sox book.  1967 seems to be a watershed year for the Sox and always seems to be the year everyone references as the highlight of an era.  It was their first real taste of success after a long drought but it was unfortunately not sustained.  Crehan’s book takes a good look at 1967 and why it is so special to Boston fans and why it was an important year in team history.  For those of us not around then or for those not paying attention to them in 1967 it gives a great look at what happened.  If you are a hardcore BoSox fan, of course you will want to read this, but some of theses stories may be tried and true classics that you love to hear about.   For others, it may be a good learning tool about 1967 and the names that help make this team famous.  You can get this book from the nice folks at Summer Game Books.

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Where would the game be without the Sportswriters.  They are a vital part of looking at the game and analyzing what transpires on the field.  Jim Kaplan previously has written for Sports Illustrated and has decided to share his thoughts on the history of the game and some of his views of players, on field plays and other aspects we may not have thought about.  Its a fun read and makes you look at things just a little differently than you had before.  You can get this one from the nice folks at Levellers Press.

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McFarland has never been a publisher that was one to shy away from overlooked players or long forgotten subjects and this one easily falls into that category.  Roy Sievers was a feared hitter during the 50″s but was often overshadowed by the other greats of that decade both on the field and in print.  Finally getting his due in book form, readers can now learn about the great career of one of baseballs most overlooked hitters of that decade as well as learn about an overall pretty nice guy.  Its important that people like this from baseball history don’t get forgotten, and McFarland has done a nice job of helping preserve his legacy by getting this to market.

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Baseball seems to have a singular year every decade where they shoot themselves in the foot and the 60’s were no exception.  Widely known for being the year of the pitcher, 1968 was the year the powers that be put their dunce caps on once again.  This is a good look at what management was like back in the day and how that has changed as well.  It also shows how baseball has been able to survive and rise above its own stupidity at times.  You can get both of these from the nice folks at McFarland.

So ready or not the new baseball season is upon us, so no matter who you root for we are all in First Place at least for one day.

Happy Reading and Go Phillies!

Gregg


 

Born Into Baseball-Laughter and Heartbreak at the Edge of the Show


No matter who you are, baseball starts with some sort of dream.  It could be a dream to see a baseball game in person, meet your favorite player or be one of the chosen few who gets to play the game professionally. What if you are one of the chosen few who belong to a family where baseball would be considered the family business, quite honestly…..how cool would that be for any of us?  Today’s book takes a look at one of the lucky ones that gets to call baseball their family business and the amazing experiences that it has afforded him and his family throughout their careers.

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By Jim Campanis Jr-2016

For my money, to be considered baseball royalty you do not have to be a Hall of Fame caliber player.  I just think you have to have a genuine love for the game and put all your efforts into it.  For those not familiar with the Campanis family, they have dedicated their lives to the game across three generations, making contributions both on and off the field.

Starting with Grandpa Al who dedicated his life to the Dodgers, both in Brooklyn and New York, he contributed to building National League powerhouses that for decades were tough to beat.  Second generation Jim Sr., had a respectable career on both the major league and minor league levels.  With stops in Los Angeles, Kansas City and Pittsburgh during his playing days, he was able to witness many things that none of us will ever get to experience around baseball.  Finally it brings us to Jim Jr.  A hot prospect in the Seattle Mariners system, that quite possibly through no fault of his own, never got the real shot he deserved to make it to the Major Leagues.

Born Into Baseball takes a look at the journey of Jim Jr.  From his upbringing experiencing the Major Leagues through his Father Jim and Grandfather Al’s careers, which ultimately led to him deciding this is what I want to do with my life.  Jim takes us through his college experiences and how he learned to appreciate and play the game on a different level.  Next he leads you through his time in the Minors.  Sharing with the reader all of the friendships he made along the way as well as sharing the lighter side of being a Minor Leaguer.  He also shows the reader what a player goes through when he realizes, by his own choice or someone else’s, that it is time to lay the dream to rest.  It is a very interesting look at what goes through the mind of an aspiring player.

One of the more interesting aspects of the book is the Campanis history lesson.  You learn about his grandfather Al who spent a lifetime with the Dodgers, representing them as they both deserved and expected.  Only in the end, to watch his entire career collapse around him due to a few unfortunate comments on national television.  It is a sad legacy to leave behind and hopefully as time goes by people will forgive the poor judgement of the comments and give Al the respect he earned throughout his lifetime.  Jim also looks at his Dad, Jim Sr’s baseball career.  It shows a level of dedication to the game and a desire to compete and reach a dream at almost any cost.

I always find it interesting the the players who never quite reach stardom always have the best insight to the game.  Perhaps it is because they spent so much time honing their craft trying to improve.  Or maybe it is because they were always behind someone a little better on the depth charts.  Whatever the reason may be, Jim Campanis has a great outlook on how the game should be played and showed himself as a willing student throughout his entire career.  What is contained in these pages proves you don’t need to be a Hall of Fame player to be a Hall of Fame person.

If you have an interest in getting a feel for what it is like to be on the other side of the baseball curtain, check this book out.  It gives a real good look at what it takes to make it to the big leagues and how much you really have to sacrifice to make your dreams come true.

You can get this book from the nice folks at Summer Game Books

Born Into Baseball

Happy Reading

Gregg

Becoming Big League-Seattle, the Pilots and Stadium Politics


If there is one thing I have learned in the new stadium craze over the last 25 years, it is that baseball and politics do not always mix.  The involved parties are usually at opposite ends of the spectrum as to what is warranted and who should pay for what.  The same problems arise, weather it is replacing an existing stadium or creating an expansion franchise.  It all comes down to how the details are handled as to what success comes from all the hard work.  Today’s book takes a look at all the struggles one city went through to get a team but still wound up on the losing end of the deal.

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By Bill Mullins-2013

Becoming Big League takes a look at the city of Seattle and their efforts to land a Major League franchise in the 1960’s.  It shows how some infighting and disagreements over the future of the city led to delays and confusion.  It also shows how the local ownership group of the Seattle Pilots were flying by the seat of their pants in all aspects of the business.

From the feel the book gives you their was a group of people, along with the powers at Major League Baseball who really wanted to see the Pilots come to Seattle and succeed. They felt it was a great location that would help baseball thrive in the northwest area of the country and be a nice accent to the teams already placed in California. In theory the Pilots were a great idea, they just met too many off the field problems to thrive.

Local government infighting along with stadium construction issues and owners who financially flew by the seat of their pants while conducting business all doomed the Pilots in Seattle.  Even almost a decade after the Pilots were gone and the Mariners arrived for round two of baseball in Seattle, many of the same problems still existed.  The only plus side at that point was that Seattle had at least learned the minimum required of them to keep their baseball franchise.  More recently Seattle has had the same problems luring the NBA to Seattle almost 50 years later.

Bill Mullins has created a great two part book.  One is the baseball study that chronicles baseball coming to the Northwest.  From the inception of the Pilots and agreements with Major League Baseball, to the moving of the franchise to Milwaukee and the birth of the Brewers.  Secondly this book is a great urban study of local politics.  Seattle wanted to keep its small time charm and quaintness, but still attract big money players.  It shows how Seattle citizenship was split down the middle as to which path they wanted their city to follow.

If you have an interest in the Seattle Pilots their is lots of great information in here about the team and their short operations.  There are some things i here that you don’t always easily come across when researching the Pilots.  If you have an interest in local politics and how Seattle of the past functioned, you should give this book a look as well.  It shows how some cities have trouble growing when they need to.

You can get this book from the nice folks at the University of Washington Press

Becoming Big League

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

 

Swish Nicholson-Wartime Baseball’s Leading Slugger


With this week’s Hall of Fame vote finally announced, you get to see how many truly amazing players that played the game.  Every year we fight about the superstars and who deserves to be enshrined this year.  Beyond these greats are the people who are the backbone of the game.  The good and borderline great players who are not Hall worthy but still had really good careers.  There are also the people who had solid days on the field but were honestly nothing memorable otherwise.  For every Hall of Fame caliber player there are hundreds of other players that fell below them in the grand scheme of the game.  It is important that history does not forget these types of players.  Through their hard work and dedication they have helped forge the story of baseball.  Today’s book takes a look at one of those players that had a good career, that while not Hall worthy, still was good enough to be respected and admired by various generations.

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By:Robert A. Greenberg-2008

I went into this book only familiar with Swish Nicholson’s time with the Philadelphia Phillies.  A member of the beloved Whiz Kids, he was a name that Phillies fans were accustomed to hearing as one of the Philly greats.  It turns out before Bill ever stopped in my hometown, he had a really incredible career in the Windy City with the Cubs, but was hindered by the fact that his prime was during the height of World War II.  Being a wartime slugger discounted his achievements on the field because the rest of the world felt all the best players were off serving in the military.  This fact created the perception of Swish Nicholson’s career as not being as good as his numbers portrayed, because the competition was not up to its normal MLB standard.

This book makes a very solid attempt at showing Nicholson’s career in the correct light it deserves.  It gives a lot of background on his personal life and growing up in the early 20th century.  The book gives the reader a real feel of what Bill Nicholson was like off the field, as well as what kind of exceptional player he was on it.  This book also shows life after baseball and with older players, I find it interesting to see their transition back into regular life.  It is so different than what modern players have to go through.  It has to be very hard to go from being a star on the field to a regular guy working 9 to 5 and punching a clock.

Book like this are important in that they keep the memories of players whom may not have been Hall of Fame worthy alive in the minds of baseball fans.  Books like this bring the past back to life and show readers various eras of the game they have only heard of through stories of older generations.  Fans should check out Swish Nicholson, it is one of those books that is both entertaining and educational for everyone.

You can get this book from the nice folks at McFarland

“Swish” Nicholson

Happy Reading

Gregg