Tagged: roger clemens

Hall of Fame Weekend Has Arrived


Well, I will admit it, I am a lousy Blogger.  Time management is not my strength when it comes to blogging, but nonetheless I have returned to try to catch up on some books.  What better time than now, it being Hall of Fame induction weekend, to catch up on some HOF books so without further comment, lets dive right in.

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Released earlier this year to conveniently coincide with his induction this year, this book takes a hard look at both Raines’ life and career in his own words.  It comes across as an honest and open account of his own life.  He admits many of his mistakes along the way and how he has tried to make amends to those he hurt.  It also opened my eyes to some of the numbers Raines put up in some of his seasons.  To me he always blended into the scenery of the N.L. East and always looked good but never seemed as good as he turned out to be.  If you have an interest in the Montreal Expos, or like Tim Raines, you will really enjoy this book from Triumph Publishing.  I for one am glad that he finally got his due, Congrats Tim!

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Last summers inductee Mike Piazza got his own book this year as well.  The book does cover his whole career but really shows the reader why he is in Cooperstown wearing a Mets cap.  It shows the love between Mets fans and Piazza and why he meant so much to them even though he played for other teams.  Greg Prince always brings his A-Game to his books and this is no exception, Mets fans, Piazza fans and even those in Philadelphia will enjoy the story of this local kid who made good.  You can get this one from Sports Publishing.

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Kaplan’s new book brings an interesting look at a single season of Hank’s storied career.  It’s easily one of the strongest years of his career and it shows the trials and tribulations hank endured while chasing the Babe’s single season home run record.  I think this is a rather hard subject to try to unearth so many years later but Kaplan does an admirable job at it and if you have an interest in this period of baseball or the social problems that came along with being Jewish you will enjoy this book.  It also proves that Jackie Robinson was not the only one enduring slurs on the field during that era.  This is another one you can get from Sports Publishing.

 

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This is someone who should be already in the hall, but keeps getting overlooked.  This book is very unique in that it contains tons of pictures.  It shows great images of Allen throughout his entire life and the text that accompanies it with in the book is top-notch.  Its different from any other Dick Allen book on the market so it is worth checking out if you like Dick Allen.  You can grab this one from Schiffer Publishing.

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I think Alan Trammell will someday be up on that stage getting his plaque in Cooperstown, but until that time all his fans have is this lone book.  Trammell is an often overlooked subject but I have never been able to figure out why.  This is the only book I have ever been able to find on him, but it is thorough and well written and gives his fans a chance to relive his one day Hall of Fame career.  Sometime all you need is one book, as long as it is good, so for Trammell fans and Tigers fans of this era this is your book.  You can pick this one up from McFarland Publishing

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Finally, Clemens is an often covered subject and one day I have a gut feeling he will make the Hall regardless of past sins.  That being said this book attempts to sum up all of the Roger Clemens events throughout his career and after.  It is a one stop shop if you will for Clemens fans and sums everything up as neatly as it can, as opposed to other books that take one aspect of the proceedings and focus on it.   If you are a Clemens fan or of the PED era, check this one from McFarland out.

That sums up this years Hall review and hopefully going forward I will be here more often, but until then…..Happy Reading!

Gregg

The 1986 World Series-There Was More Than Game Six


I am a big fan of anniversaries and nostalgia in baseball.  Its good to remember where we came from and what has been accomplished, so a remembrance is always a welcome sight in my eyes.  This year we knew it was coming, the 30th anniversary of the 86 World Series.  It seems to  be a bigger deal this year than the 25th anniversary was, but I always thought the 25th was celebrated more than the 30th, so I’m confused.  Be my confusion what it is, we have chosen to go all out and celebrate the 30th anniversary of one of the most thrilling World Series’ on record.  With this anniversary there have been a slew of new books coming out celebrating the World Series champs, but today’s books take a look at both teams and gives balanced comparisons of them.

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By: SABR-2016

If you are not familiar with the Society for American Baseball Research (SABR), you have no idea what you are missing.  They are the folks who do tireless research and find us more information about our sport than we all ever thought possible.  They research complete teams and individual players, and do a stellar job at both.  New for this years 30th Anniversary, they have produced two different but connected books that remind fans that the series was about more than just Bill Buckner.

Both of the books follow the same format, so as I am describing them it pertains to both volumes.  The authors look at each man on that respective teams roster for the 1986 season.  Giving in depth bios, analysis of the season performance and interesting facts about the players.  They follow the same format for the Manager, General Manager, Coaching Staff and Announcers.  So if this is not your home town team you get a real good feel of their complete personnel package.

Next they look at key team performances throughout the year and take note of several key games that helped the team gain momentum and what made them work as a cohesive unit.  Next you see analysis of the Championship Series and the World Series.  Finally, it asks a few honest questions about the way the teams were constructed and the important numbers that stick out for each team.

Quite honestly, this is your typical SABR book and is in line with what we have all come to expect from them.  It is well researched and you feel very comfortable in the fact that you can take all information at face value and accept as that. Mainly this is because of the tireless efforts and dedication of the SABR staff and the quality work that every one of them puts forth on SABR projects.  Each one of these folks that worked on these books should be commended because they have created another quality product.

Baseball fans should check this out because there is always something new fans can learn from these types of SABR books, plus it’s always fun to remember Bill Buckner.

You can get these books from the nice folks at SABR.

1986 Mets/Red Sox

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

Team Chemistry-The History of Drugs and Alcohol in Baseball


Drugs has a nasty ring to it, no matter what your line of work.  I am sure some occupations have a higher recreational drug use than others.  Reasons could be stress or the dangers of the job, but it is still recreational drug use.  What about the times that the drug use is because it gives you an edge over your co-workers.  Essentially, that is what drug use is for in the professional sports leagues.  To give you that edge over your teammates, to get you to the next big contract and reach that big pay day.  The last 35 years or so there has been some well documented heavy duty drug use in baseball.  So much so, that drug trials have almost been the norm every so often.  Prior to the last 35 years Major League Baseball did a much better job of keeping the genie in the bottle.  Now there is a book that takes a look at baseball’s drug abuse problem beyond the steroid’s scandals.

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By Nathan Michael Corzine-2016

If you look at all the usual items that baseball players have used since the beginning of time, there are certain things that you could categorize as drugs just due to the fact that they have addictive qualities to them.  Alcohol and tobacco have been around since the beginning of baseball.  Now if you add in greenie pills, you get another drug that was a baseball staple long before cocaine and other performance enhancing drugs.

What Nathan Corzine tries to do with this book is show the full history of drugs within the game.  The way he goes about it is very eye opening at least for me, because he is able to prove the progression of stimulants and illegal drugs throughout the game.  It goes to show that the powers that be within baseball ownership did a very good job of hiding the truth.  In all reality how many times have you looked at Mickey Mantle’s drinking problem and thought that is part of the bigger problem?  This book takes those types of things to task and shows we have had the same types of problems all along, they were just hiding in different disguises.

Corzine’s book really makes you stop and think about baseball history.  It takes issues with more than just Roger Clemens in a locker room bathroom or even Balco.  These are just recent faces to the problems that have been hiding in the shadows of baseball for much longer than any of us have realized.

If you have any interest in the drug scandals of the last four decades, check this book out. You may be surprised to see that these issues have been lurking in the shadows much longer than any of us wanted to realize or admit to.  Reader’s may not buy in 100% of all the things that would be considered drugs in this book, but it will definitely make you re-think what your definition truly is.

You can get this book from the nice folks at the University of Illinois Press

Team Chemistry-The History of Drugs and Alcohol in MLB

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

 

 

Game 7, 1986-Failure and Triumph in the Biggest Game of My Life


I think I am a fairly ordinary guy.  Growing older somewhat gracefully, as my inner child slowly calms down.  I think a by-product of growing older is your memory is not as great as it used to be.  If you asked me what I ate for breakfast a few days ago, I may have trouble giving you the correct answer.  Another side effect of the passage of time on the memory is nostalgia.  You may romanticize things and enjoy them much more today than you actually did thirty years ago.  In the last few years there have been books published that dissect a game from several decades prior, inning by inning and pitch by pitch, which leads to my first of many questions.  How do players remember everything that happened during a specific game, every thought process, every tobacco spit and every sneer at an opposing player.  If you ask why am I asking such a silly question, please see the sentence above about my breakfast.  Anyhow, today’s book follows this same format about game seven of one of the most dramatic World Series in recent memory.

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By:Ron Darling-2016

The 1986 World Series without a doubt was full of plenty of drama.  From the New York Mets trek to the big dance via Houston, to Bill Buckner making himself a footnote in baseball history, 1986 is a hard one to forget.  Ron Darling on most other baseball pitching staffs would have easily been the Ace, but on the Mets he was in the shadows of one phenom, namely Dwight Gooden.  Nonetheless Darling was the arm on tap to pitch Game 7 of the 1986 World Series.  Most people forget that the Buckner error was in Game 6 which then led to needing to play a game 7.

Ron Darling has made a nice little post pitching career for himself being a baseball analyst for both the Mets and the MLB Network.  He has great natural insight into the game and always explains the nuances to the fans so that the get a full understanding of the issues at hand.  Darling takes the same approach in his new book.

He takes the reader through Game 7 inning by inning, explaining the thought process used in his pitches as well as what was going on around him.  You see how the pitcher Ron Darling was processing the events of the day, but he also shows how the person Ron Darling was interpreting it as well.  It gives a real good rendition of the players take on what happened in Game 7, from a person who was on an emotional see-saw the entire evening.

Darling also gives a little glimpse of his personal life as well as some takes on his New York teammates.  It is not an in-depth analysis of his fellow Mets but it certainly gives the reader a behind the scenes glimpse of the team.

The question still sticks in my mind, how do you remember this much vivid detail 30 years later?  Admittedly he used some video footage to “refresh” his memory, but I still find it hard to accept these types of books as 100% credible.  Time easily distorts things even with the aide of video tape.  It also seems to some degree Ron darling is apologizing for his pitching performance but does seem to take the attitude of “I am sure glad we won, even though I sucked”.

This book is an enjoyable and quick read.  It flows smoothly and if Ron Darling is remembering correctly, gives the reader some great detail into Game 7.  It was a World Series to remember and all baseball fans will enjoy reliving this one special game.

You can get this book from the nice folks at St. Martins Press

Game 7, 1986

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

Swish Nicholson-Wartime Baseball’s Leading Slugger


With this week’s Hall of Fame vote finally announced, you get to see how many truly amazing players that played the game.  Every year we fight about the superstars and who deserves to be enshrined this year.  Beyond these greats are the people who are the backbone of the game.  The good and borderline great players who are not Hall worthy but still had really good careers.  There are also the people who had solid days on the field but were honestly nothing memorable otherwise.  For every Hall of Fame caliber player there are hundreds of other players that fell below them in the grand scheme of the game.  It is important that history does not forget these types of players.  Through their hard work and dedication they have helped forge the story of baseball.  Today’s book takes a look at one of those players that had a good career, that while not Hall worthy, still was good enough to be respected and admired by various generations.

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By:Robert A. Greenberg-2008

I went into this book only familiar with Swish Nicholson’s time with the Philadelphia Phillies.  A member of the beloved Whiz Kids, he was a name that Phillies fans were accustomed to hearing as one of the Philly greats.  It turns out before Bill ever stopped in my hometown, he had a really incredible career in the Windy City with the Cubs, but was hindered by the fact that his prime was during the height of World War II.  Being a wartime slugger discounted his achievements on the field because the rest of the world felt all the best players were off serving in the military.  This fact created the perception of Swish Nicholson’s career as not being as good as his numbers portrayed, because the competition was not up to its normal MLB standard.

This book makes a very solid attempt at showing Nicholson’s career in the correct light it deserves.  It gives a lot of background on his personal life and growing up in the early 20th century.  The book gives the reader a real feel of what Bill Nicholson was like off the field, as well as what kind of exceptional player he was on it.  This book also shows life after baseball and with older players, I find it interesting to see their transition back into regular life.  It is so different than what modern players have to go through.  It has to be very hard to go from being a star on the field to a regular guy working 9 to 5 and punching a clock.

Book like this are important in that they keep the memories of players whom may not have been Hall of Fame worthy alive in the minds of baseball fans.  Books like this bring the past back to life and show readers various eras of the game they have only heard of through stories of older generations.  Fans should check out Swish Nicholson, it is one of those books that is both entertaining and educational for everyone.

You can get this book from the nice folks at McFarland

“Swish” Nicholson

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

 

My 30 Ballpark Summer


Well, the holidays are officially over.  The decorations are away and we are all well on our way to breaking our new years resolutions.  It is currently 4 degrees outside of my house and I am patiently awaiting spring training. During this time my wife and I wonder where would we like to go on any trips this year and if we are going to make it to any Phillies games.  The latter part of that planning, the Phillies games, leads me to wonder if we could plan a couple trips and see some other stadiums as well.  Usually I get overruled on the other cities but we at least make it to the Phils. Today’s book is about one man’s journey and his trek to visit all 30 of the MLB stadiums.

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By:Tobey Shiverick-2016

I will be honest, a trip like this is my ultimate dream.  Checking out each stadium and every team that calls each one home.  This will be my retirement plan, just no one can tell my wife yet.  So for now, I have to live vicariously through Tobey Shiverick.

Shiverick brings us along his 18 flight, five month, 34,000 mile baseball journey.  He walks us through his experience at each stadium and gives us the highs or lows that he feels each has to offer.  He gives the reader the general vibe of the stadium and that of the teams fans.  I can only attest to Philadelphia, but he did have a pretty good read on Citizens Bank Park after only one game.

For a true baseball fan this would be the ultimate experience.  For fans from the same generation as the author, you also get the added bonus of being able to compare the stadiums of yesteryear to the modern palaces of today.  From Ebbets Field, to Dodger Stadium, The Polo Grounds to the palace in San Fran and of course, Yankee Stadium vs. that new one they built across the street.

Even fans of my generation would be able to do the some comparison to a lesser degree.  We would be able to do Shea Stadium to Citi Field,  Veterans Stadium to Citizens Bank Park and Three Rivers to PNC Park.  None of those generate heart palpitations in the spectrum of great stadiums, but does help foster some nostalgia nonetheless.

This book may be geared more to the older crowd versus the younger fan, mostly because the older generations would be able to afford this type of journey.  The expense has to be enormous between stops in 30 cities, hotel rooms, travels and meals.   The average fan would have a hard time being able to pony up the cash to pull this one off.  Also the print in this book is a little bigger than a lot of books I come across, so I am assuming they are expecting an older crowd reading the book.  Quite honestly, I read so many books that I appreciated the larger print for a change.

Fans should check this out.  Even if you are not able to do a 30 park tour, this book would be able to help you pick even one new park to check out.  It has endless value for fans in getting a feel for those parks they have never been to.

You can get this book from the nice folks at Summer Game Books

My 30 Ballpark Summer

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

 

 

 

They Call Me Oil Can – Baseball, Drugs and Life on the Edge


Even though baseball players are constantly in the public eye, it does not mean you always get one hundred percent of the details.  Almost every players image until recently was a product of their teams media relations department. They would work tirelessly to keep certain issues and events out of the public eye.  In the advent of our instant media society some of the demons escape long before anyone on the team knows anything about them.  Such is the tale of todays book.  Oil Can Boyd was a rising star but you never knew about all of the demons lurking inside his soul.

By: Dennis Oil Can Boyd - 2012

By: Dennis Oil Can Boyd – 2012

Dennis Boyd was a superstar not long into his career.  With a nickname like Oil Can, he was bound to be a fan favorite in Boston.  Underneath the smiling surface were demons that were gnawing away at the star pitcher and made his life difficult at the very least.  Being under the sports microscope that Boston is probably didn’t help Boyd’s problems and the end results were more than likely etched in stone long before anyone realized.

A product of the deep south, Dennis Boyd was a youngster when racism was rampant.  Events that occurred during his upbringing did a lot of damage in shaping the man he became.  You can see that many of these events effected the way he approached his own life and how he dealt with people, thus the outcomes that occurred during his career. These same feelings towards the world around him also show how it led him into a life of drugs that damaged his career and relationships with those close to him.

By far Dennis Boyd does not come out of this book looking like a villan or a victim.  He comes across as an honest caring man who just wants to be accepted for who he is.  Unfortunately, it is one of those circumstances in life that his surroundings have effected him so deeply that he used the only outlets he felt were available.   The book is his honest account of what he feels life has dealt him, and it seems he is not holding anything back.  After reading this book I think I have a better understanding of what makes Oil Can tick, and it seems he is a half decent guy that just had some bad breaks.  My personal view of him has improved through reading this book and I don’t think he is really the head case that the media had made him out to be.

Red Sox and Expos fans will love this book, just because of the team connection.  I think fans in general may like it as well because the book is very honest.  It does not pull any punches and Dennis Boyd becomes a better stronger man as the book progresses.  Even if you hated Oil Can it might be worth checking out because you perception of him may change by the end.

You can get this book from the nice folks at Triumph Books

They Call Me Oil Can

Happy Reading

Gregg