Tagged: Rod Carew

Lyman Bostock-The Inspiring Life and Tragic Death of a Ballplayer


Life can be cruel and that’s a fact.   It can offer us so much opportunity and promise and in one blink of an eye it can all be gone.  We see it time and time again in baseball, but a lot of the time it is due to injury.  When it is due to the loss of life, baseball as a game becomes unimportant and we learn how much we actually care about the people who play the game on a whole different level.  Lyman Bostock is one case where we were left to ask what if.  A career cut short due to his untimely murder, which was full of promise and unlimited potential.  For me, Bostock’s story was always one that left me wondering about the details surrounding his untimely demise, but now we have a book to help us all fill in the blanks.

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By:K. Adam Powell-2017

When you stop and take a look at Lyman Bostock’s career numbers, one has to admit this guy was the real deal.  He was always in contention for batting titles, was always improving his game and based on the small career sampling size, if he had kept up that pace would easily have been a Hall of Famer.  But we all know how his career was cut short and left us with that void in Lyman’s story.  Today’s book looks at his life and career and shows the reader the story of the man and promise wasted.

Powell’s book takes a look at Bostock’s meager upbringing in California and how he worked his way up through the ranks of High School and College baseball, through the minor leagues and eventually to the Major Leagues.  It shows a story of perseverance and overcoming life’s obstacles.  It also shares the story of how Lyman Bostock’s father who in his own right was a Negro League star, was not much of an influence in his childhood or his rise to stardom.

The book looks at his first stop in the majors with Minnesota with the Twins and the bond he created with teammates and the lessons he learned from teammate Rod Carew on how to become a better hitter.  It also shows the negative side of the relationship with Twins management that came to head with Lyman leaving town.  It is a period of great growth for Bostock as a player and it showed how he was always looking for a way to improve his game by listening to teammates and heading their advice.  You learn about Bostocks love of his family during this period and how whenever he had the chance he would seize the opportunity to spend time with them.  It was this love of family that played into his untimely demise.

After signing with the Angels and not living up to the expectations, you learn what kind of fabric Lyman was really made of.  After essentially flopping his first month with the team he gave his salary to charity.  It was acts like this and his anonymous other charitable gestures that show what a cool guy he really was.

A very important aspect of this book, shows the reader all of the details leading up to Lymans final moments.  The readers get all the details of the who, what, when, why and where of that fateful night.  It filled in a lot of the blanks in the story for me and put to rest any doubts of what a stand up guy Lyman Bostock really was from beginning until the end.

Powell did a great job of sharingBostock’s story which I feel has been a very overlooked or forgotten subject.  His time in both life and baseball were very short, but his impact was much greater beyond his years.  Check this book out, I don’t think anyone who puts the effort into reading this will regret it.

You can get this book from the nice folks at Rowman & Littlefield

Lyman Bostock

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

 

 

Baseball’s Power Shift-How the Players Union, the Fans and the Media Changed America’s Sports Culture


This time of year with Spring Training in full swing, it reminds us of all the exciting possibilities this upcoming year has to offer.  Everyone is looking forward to all the games and highlights in the near future, but the business end of baseball is the furthest thing from most fans minds.  Truth be told, somewhere, someone is attending to the business end of the game and always has.  Most fans don’t think about the contract negotiations that take place, the players working conditions that the union fights for or the meal money stipend the players get.  These are all the realities of the game and have been for decades.  It may be hard to comprehend for the average fan why these are important and further more how they arrived at where they stand today, but today’s book takes the time to explain what has transpired throughout the history of the game in regards to working conditions.

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By: Krister Swanson-2016

Krister Swanson has created a really interesting book.  It starts from the very early years of the game and shows what relations were like between the owners and players.  It was more of a parental relationship versus a business one.  It shows how the owners were able to realize what an advantages they had in the reserve clause and how to  use it to their own benefit.  The author shows how owners were able to maintain low salaries and reap all the rewards without having to share almost anything with their players.

Swanson also shows that the players started to realize how they were being exploited by the owners and attempted to improve conditions both on the field and monetarily.  The few feeble attempts at first which finally led to the formation of the MLBPA are chronicled in these pages.  I don’t think the owners or the establishment of the game itself had any idea what the possibilities were for the newly formed union.  It shows the union’s rise to power, how the media helped that and the fans sympathy that would help them along their journey.  The book also covers the few short strikes and lockouts along the way that occurred, just to keep things interesting.

The problem I had with the book is it seemed to stop the history lesson after the 1981 players strike.  I know as a fan, there were other strikes that occurred after 1981 and they were very influential on the shape of the game we now know.  Obviously there are other books out there that cover these strikes, but I think for complete coverage of the topic it should have been included in some shape or form in this book.  The only other problem I had was it said that Bob Feller played his entire career for the Braves.  I mean for me that is a huge error that should have been caught by someone.

Overall this is a very entertaining book.  It gives a great and thorough history lesson that even the most die hard baseball fan will be able to gain some knowledge from, plus the early years of labor relations within the game are not always widely covered.

You can get this book from the nice folks at the University of Nebraska Press

Power Shift

Happy Reading

Gregg

Swinging ’73-Baseball’s Wildest Season


Some baseball seasons seem to have their own personality.  It could be the antics happening on the field or the drama that unfolds behind the scenes that keep certain seasons alive in the minds of fans for decades.  The 70’s was a decade that was never short on excitement.  Pick any year in that decade and something monumental was happening that helped shape the future of the game.  1973 was no different.  The most historical feat was the introduction of the Designated Hitter.  So monumental was it, that 45 years later we are still fighting over whether it is a good thing or not.  Today’s book takes a look at year that gave use everything from the DH to a long goodbye to Willie Mays.

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By:Matthew Silverman-2013

In the past couple years a few authors have taken on the task of picking a season from the 70’s and dissecting it.  Silverman has no shortage of material to work with in 1973, that is for sure.  From the introduction to the DH, the closing of original Yankee Stadium, the Miracle Mets and the wife swapping of Fritz Peterson are just a few of the points that made 1973 a spectacular season.

The author has done a nice job at looking at some of the important subjects of 1973, as mentioned above the implementation of the Designated Hitter, the painful farewell of Willie Mays and the Miracle Mets, the closing of original Yankee Stadium for remodeling, the Oakland A’s and their repeat winning of the division and of course last but not least new Yankees owner George Steinbrenner and his wife swapping pitchers.  Silverman covered them all with accuracy and great detail, he has presented a story that was interesting and engaging and a good read for the average fan on these subjects.

The problem I has with this book is that there was more going on in 1973 than just these few subjects mentioned above.  Hank Aaron was hot on the trail of Babe Ruth at that point.  You were right in the middle of Pete Rose and the Big Red Machine.  Roberto Clemente was killed right before the season started in a plane crash.  So there was no shortage of big stories that were a factor in 1973.  The author has mentioned some of these events in passing throughout the book, but nothing of any substantial merit, so I think he missed the boat there.

I understand the reasoning of why you would not want to spend any great amount of time talking about teams such as the Philadelphia Phillies and Cleveland Indians, who were perennial bottom feeders in that era, but I think you would still want to address the full state of baseball if you were writing about one single season.  There were so many different things going on that it would have enable the reader to get a much broader picture of what was truly happening in the game of baseball during 1973.

By far this is not a bad book.  It covers the subjects it chooses to, very well.  Silverman is thorough and puts a fun spin on the events of 73.  He has created a good product that is definitely worth reading, just readers should be aware that it covers a few subjects very heavily, while passing over some of the events of that year of particular importance.

Perhaps I am just spoiled by books like Dan Epstein’s Stars and Strikes that covered the 1976 season, and now I hold all season books to that standard.  I don’t think any fan with an interest in 1973 will be disappointed, I just think the author missed his chance to paint a much broader picture of the magic that was 1973.

You can get this book from the nice folks at Lyons Press

Swinging ’73

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

 

 

 

It Has to Start Somewhere!!!!!!


Baseball is a game full of firsts.  First pitch, first game, first out, first inning……the list is endless.  But for us baseball book geeks (a badge I wear with honor by the way), that list of firsts also includes our first baseball book.  For some people it starts in childhood when you get that first juvenile baseball book under your belt.  For others its in adulthood after you settle down and figure out who you are.  Then for the rest of us, its starts when you are 12 years old and stumble upon a book that you may not have been the target audience.

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There has never been a shortage of biographies out there about Reggie Jackson.  This one from 1984  I hold in higher esteem than all the others, mostly because it was my first.  My first baseball book was a shear accident.  My Dad, who I owe most of my fan dedication and knowledge to, bought me this book.  From his Thursday night supermarket trip in 1985 he plucked it from the bargain bin at Pathmark and brought it home for me.  Thus sending me on a literary journey lasting over 30 years so far.

I always liked Reggie Jackson because he was somewhat of a local hero.  He grew up in the town five minutes away from the one I grew up in.  He went to the local high school and at that time was the one superstar who came from our own backyard.  So right off the bat the appeal was there about the book of our local guy made good.

Now this book has been out for over thirty years, is probably tame by today’s standards and more biographies about Reggie have come out in the subsequent decades.   But for me, after countless other books, this book is the one.  For all of my time on earth, this book about Reggie, this tattered copy especially, will hold a special place in my heart forever.  It is the book that made me realize how many cool baseball books were out there. I may not have been the target audience of this book, but it did open my eyes to what baseball was really like.   This book led me to baseball classics, such as Dynasty and Bums by Peter Golenbock.  To books about Cobb, Ruth, Gehrig, Mantle, Musial, Maris, DiMaggio and hundreds of others. Taking me to places in my own head, which for some was the only way imaginable to get there, allowing me to learn about the people and places that made baseball great.

I realize a lot of people say Ball Four was the book that brought them into the baseball world, and that it is the epitome of the baseball book.  For my money I will stick with my copy of Reggie.  Everybody has that one special baseball book they love for whatever reason they so chose.  For me its not that popular tell-all baseball book by Jim Bouton that everyone loves to some degree.  It is yet another tired rendition of how great Reggie Jackson was or is, depending on how you look at it and there is no other book out there I am willing to give it up for.

So take some time and pull out that old copy of the book that started it all for you.  Spend some time with that old worn out friend and re-live what made baseball books so appealing to you, because you will never forget your first.

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

 

 

Ty Cobb – A Terrible Beauty


There are players in the history of baseball that transcend all of time.  No matter how much time passes they are in conversations and debates almost on a daily basis.  Names like Mantle, DiMaggio, Williams,  Mays, Aaron, Bonds and Rose are all names that will forever be talked about and for the most part held in high regard.  Regardless of their transgressions on and off the field they are still beloved by many.  There are others that the exact opposite is true of.  One such person is Ty Cobb. More than a few books have been written about The Georgia Peach and his exploits and honestly up until now most have not been complimentary.  There was a new book published this year that attempts to change how we feel about Ty Cobb.

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By: Charles Leerhsen – 2015

Charles Leerhsen took on a pretty big task in trying to change Ty Cobb’s image.  It seems we as baseball fans and as a society were pretty set in our opinions of Cobb.  We accepted the facts that he was a cut throat player willing to win at any cost.  We also accepted the fact that he was a raging racist during his life.  Basically we all were comfortable accepting the fact that he was an all around SOB.  Through other books that were written, most of these facts were able to be backed up by stories and first hand accounts, and even though we now know a few may have been fabrications, we were all pretty set in our opinions.  But what if we are wrong?

The author, through newspaper articles, interviews and some of Cobb’s own writings has tried to get to the real man behind the image.  He does an in-depth look at the personality and the behavior of the man set in his own era.  He attempts to dispel rumors, expose certain truths as fraud and show the gentler, kinder side of ole’ Ty.

This book gets its point across very eloquently and does pose some very interesting questions for the reader.  Perhaps the biggest question I had at the end of this is were we wrong?  I don’t know for sure honestly, but it definitely has raised some serious questions in my mind.  Cobb’s grandson Herschel wrote a book about Ty last year and that to me started the ball rolling in my mind that maybe we have the story a little skewed.  I finished the book and still in my own mind have no definitive answers on Ty Cobb, but I have opened up to the possibility that the accepted story may not at the very least be accurate.

I recommend this book to any and all baseball fans because if nothing else it will start to make you wonder.  It is written very well and moves along nicely.  It is not a mindless biography and it forces the reader to contemplate whether they still accept the opinions we have previously accepted as fact.  Maybe someone will also help me figure out what I think about the whole subject, because I am still not sure.

Ty Cobb – A Terrible Beauty

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

Harmon Killebrew – Ultimate Slugger


I find it fascinating that there are people who have played this game and despite their momentous accomplishments on the field can to some degree remain in the shadows.  Perhaps this is by design, but I find it hard to believe a player would want to avoid accolades.  Maybe it is the player being a victim of circumstances in playing for a team in a small market or he is just being a bright spot on some very bad teams.  Whatever the reasons may be one of the players that I felt may not have always gotten his due is Harmon Killebrew.  Playing for first the Washington Senators/Minnesota Twins and finally the Kansas City Royals, Killebrew never really spent any great amount of time in a large market.  I think this plays into the premise for me that even though Killebrew earned his Hall of Fame status he never really got the notoriety he was due.  Today’s book takes a look at the gentle giant that lurked behind Killer Killebrew.

By: Steve Aschburner - 2012

By: Steve Aschburner – 2012

From normal American upbringings in Idaho, Harmon Killebrew was like every other kid in the post World War II era. A local hero with respect for his elders there was nothing bad that could be said about young Harmon.  This book follows the home town hero through his local rise to stardom and his trek to the big leagues.  It has countless interviews with some of the folks that crossed paths with Harmon and not a single person had anything negative to say about the slugger.  If they were friends in High School and have not seen him in 40 years everyone still considered him their friend.

Aschburner takes the reader through Killebrew’s journey, getting established in the majors and getting adjusted to his new locales.  He gives the reader a glimpse of the persona behind the player and how it didn’t matter who you were, Harmon Killebrew seemed to treat everyone just the same.  It shows the humble character of Harmon that was something that never changed his entire life.

I always find interesting in these books how a player deals with the downside of his own career.  It is inevitable and something every player in every generation will have to face.  Like everything else he did in life Harmon faces it with grace and dignity and moves to the next chapter of his life.  The author shows the reader how life after baseball can be hard on any player, even the Superstars. Money and health are two key real life issues that effected the post playing days for this Hall of Famer. It was a good look at the humanity involved in Harmon Killebrew.

Steve Aschburner did a real nice job with this book.  I honestly feel that after reading this book I have a better feel of who Harmon Killebrew the person was.  We are all familiar with the Hall of Fame player, who unfortunately played in a city that may have hampered us to getting to see his personality off the field.

I would recommend this book for all baseball fans.  It’s a nice, easy reading book and it offers the fact that you would be hard pressed to find anyone that anything bad to say about Harmon Killebrew.

You can get this book from the nice folks at Triumph Books

Harmon Killebrew-Ultimate Slugger

Happy Reading

Gregg

Hardball Retrospective – Forcing You to Rethink Everything You Thought You Knew


Numbers are an important part of baseball history.  They tell us everything that has happened through the years, while also giving a basis on which to judge performance.  In the last two or three decades the ways in which players are measured have changed and it has ushered in monumental changes within the game.  But what if you use these current day formulas to see what the prior generations may have missed, what would change and who’s legacy would be changed forever?  Well today’s book takes a look at how these calculations would have changed the history of the game.

By: Derek Bain - 2015

By: Derek Bain – 2015

I don’t often do this, but if I had to sum this book up in one word it would be…..WOW!!!!!!  Hardball Retrospective takes statistical analysis to the next level.  It takes a look at every season and every team from 1901 through 2013 and reanalysed the data .  By using current standards it evaluates each individual teams scouting methods and the final outcomes for each season.  It shows how the standings may have been different, which really alters the entire baseball landscape as we have known it.

Derek Bain has done an incredible job of reformulating team statistics and analyzing each decade.  This book also does a nice job of explaining the terminology and methodology used in calculating all of these results.  That is important in the fact that it will not be overwhelming for the average fan.  Bain presents all of his results in easy to read charts and formats that makes it an inviting read.  With some of the other statistical analysis books that are on the market the reader can feel overwhelmed and a little put off.  Hardball Retrospective does a nice job of avoiding the pompousness that is sometimes contained in these types of books.  Plus, what is not to love about that 70’s era picture of Rod Carew on the cover.

Fans of the game should really put on their thinking caps and check this out.  It puts a whole new spin on the game we love and also makes you wonder what may have been for your team.  For myself being a Phillies fan and realizing they have stunk for most of their existence, this book changed the way I look at them and realize they may have been lucky more than good when the finally found some success.

The link below can lead you to where you can pick this up in either the Kindle of Print version, but I think you will want to get the print version just to use as a point of reference over and over again

Hardball Retrospective-Evaluating Scouting and Development Outcomes for the Modern-Era Franchises

Happy Reading

Gregg

The Little General – Gene Mauch A Baseball Life


I think there are many great injustices within the game of baseball.  From plays on the field that get called incorrectly to the many talented people who fall into the cracks of history.  There are too many baseball professionals that give their entire lives and every fiber of their beings to the game and in return do not receive the accolades they truly deserve.  Managers sometimes are a bunch that gets forgotten if they do not reach the pinnacle of the game.  Regardless of how they perform over their entire career, if they don’t win a World Series, they usually get forgotten when speaking of the greats.  Todays book takes a look at one of those people who truly was a great manager and gets forgotten when the conversation turns to Baseballs Greatest Managers.

By:Mel Proctor-2015

By:Mel Proctor-2015

I must admit I was very excited about this book.  Gene Mauch has for a long time topped my list of one of the best managers the game has had to offer during its history.  Always one to be saddled with the task of building a winner from the ground up, he never shied from a task like that and rose to the challenge of laying the groundwork for winning teams.

Mel Procter has taken a look at Gene Mauch’s entire career in this book.  From border line Major League player and star in the minors.  You get to see the passion and fire that was a Gene Mauch trademark on the field.  The reader sees what made Mauch tick and the drive that helped propel his small stature and guts into a hard-nosed player who earned the respect of teammates and fans alike.  Being a fan of Mauch this is something that I was not very familiar with.  There is plenty of documentation about his short stays in the Majors, but the Minor League stories were new ones to me, which helped paint a broader picture of his skills and his career.

Seizing the opportunity with the Phillies, the reader then journeys through his managerial career.  It shows the methodical nature that Mauch tried to build winners and the inherent struggles associated with trying to build from within during that era.  Gene’s next stops were Montreal, Minnesota and California, all of which saw varying degrees of improvement under Gene.  You see how his personality of hard-nosed play and determination is transmitted to his players, so maybe winning is contagious after all.  The only down side to the manager portion of the story is that I would have liked to see some more stories about the Twins and Angels.  Those sections weren’t as long as the ones about Philly and Montreal, but when you have a career that spans this many decades you probably have to make some cuts somewhere.

Mel Proctor should be very proud of this book.  He has given complete and honest coverage to a baseball personality that I think gets shafted sometimes.  Just because he came within one pitch of actually making the World Series and was also the captain of the Titanic in Philadelphia in 1964 does not make him a bad manager.  To the contrary I think Mauch was one of the more dedicated and smarter managers in the game during his era and was unfortunately the victim of some bad baseball timing.  There are other managers in the Hall of Fame with multiple World Series trophies that are there partly due to the pinstripes they wore.  I think man for man, Gene Mauch could outshine many of them.

Check out this book for yourself and give Gene Mauch the respect he deserves.  After a life long dedication to the game, he deserves at least that much and honestly baseball fans will enjoy this one.  This may be one of the few chances we as fans get to learn about the real Gene Mauch

You can get this book from the nice folks at Cardinal Publishing

http://www.cardinalpub.com/store/the-little-general-gene-mauch/

Happy Reading

Gregg

Minnesota Twins Baseball – Hardball History on the Prairie


Every team has a history.  Some teams have stayed in one place and followed the straight and narrow, while others have made stops along the way, some of those in three or four towns no less.  Sometimes it is lack of fan support, the lure of a new stadium or for other owners its just the temptation that the grass is greener on the other side, that makes them up-root their teams.  The Minnesota Twins, born out of the remains of the original Washington Senators, are one of those such teams and todays book takes a look at their rich history after moving out to the prairie.

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By:Stew Thornley-2014 The History Press

The upper mid-west was a grand opportunity for the owner of the Minnesota Twins.  There was not much in the way of professional sports representation for that area at the time, and Calvin Griffith saw a gold mine for the taking.  Sometimes these moves go as expected and sometimes not, just ask Charlie Finley how Kansas City was.  Regardless, Minnesota got a new baseball team for the 1961 season and the endless love affair between team and city has not missed a beat since.

Stew Thornley takes an in-depth look at the team from its humble beginnings in 1961, through a few World Series appearances and finally to their new home at Target Field.  The author breaks down each decade of the teams existence and shows the highs and lows that came about.  The book is a very quick read at only 123 pages, but it does not just touch on the main events.  It encompasses the minor details that have made Twins baseball special to the people of Minnesota.  Thornley also gives a nice overview of what baseball was in Minnesota prior to the Twins arrival on semi-pro levels.  From Killebrew and Oliva to Molitor and Mauer, this book does a great job of covering the team history.

If you are a Twins fan or someone who is not in the Minnesota region but likes to learn about team history, you will really enjoy this book.  It paints a solid team picture in a short span, and helps you understand why the fans of Minnesota are so proud of their hometown team.

You can get this book from the nice folks at The History Press

http://www.historypress.net

 

Carew, an intimate look at Rod Carew


With the Hall of Fame voting coming up in a few weeks, everyone is wondering who will be next.  Will it be a superstar who played on the biggest of stages every night?  Or will it be someone from a small stage that had an incredible career.  Only time will tell, but todays book takes a look at a player that worked day in and day out to perfect his craft on a smaller stage.

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Carew

By: Rod Carew & Ira Berkow – 2010 University of Minnesota Press

Rod Carew was a sure-fire Hall of Famer, no one denies that.  The only problem was, I don’t think he ever got the true recognition he deserved.  Mainly due to the fact that he played some of his most productive years as a member of the Minnesota Twins.  He never hit for massive power, but he still put up some incredible career numbers that punched his ticket for the Hall of Fame.

This book was first published in 1979 and was an incredible story.  It was re-issued in 2010 to add the years covering the end of his career, life after baseball and his HOF induction.  Carew is honest and forthright in this book, discussing his upbringing in Panama, his move to the United States, his baseball career and his marriage to white Jewish woman in the U.S..  Remember, this was during the time when interracial marriages were not accepted in our society, so you see the difficulties he had to overcome in regard to that issue.  You get some insight into his career and life after baseball, but nothing earth shattering.

For the heights that tell-all player biographies have reached in the last few decades, this one is very tame.  You get thorough information and what seems like honesty out of Carew but really nothing that makes you go wow I can’t believe that happened.  That is always the feeling I have had about Rod Carew.  A great and dedicated player that went about his business and was not interested in making waves or being a showman.  Perhaps part of the book comes off this way because it was first published back in 1979.  In all honesty I just think it is how Carew operates and Ira Berkow portrays the man and the player accurately.  I still think as far as Hall of Famers go Carew is underrated but I don’t think anything will ever change that.

If you have any interest in Rod Carew or his baseball career this will be a very good read for you.  For someone who does not seem to crave the limelight of his stardom you get a good look at the true man.  Minnesota Twins and California Angels fans will also really enjoy the look at their hometown hero.

You can get this book from the nice folks at The University of Minnesota Press

http://www.upress.umn.edu

Happy Reading and a safe and Merry Christmas to all my friends that hang out in the bookcase with me

Gregg