Tagged: Rick Huhn

The Chalmers Race and the 1910 Batting Title


I have of late, spent a lot of time looking at books that go back over a century in baseball history.  Sometimes the books I have on hand steer the blog more than I ever do.  When you go back this far in history, it is a daunting task to try and answer some question. Record keeping was not even close to the standards that it is today, and the game as a whole created some questionable outcomes.  So I am not really sure how an author would even try and research something from this era and feel confident in the outcomes.  As a baseball community I think we have accepted as accurate what is in the record books but it is still open to some questions no matter who it is.  Rick Huhn has in the past written books from this era and has done an admirable job with the, so with today’s book I am expecting more of the same.

download

By Rick Huhn-2014

For those not familiar with this story, auto magnate Hugh Chalmers offered a new Chalmers automobile to the winner of the 1910 batting championship.  By today’s standards a car is no big deal but by 1910 standards, cars were new fangled contraptions that were not commonplace.  So for the players involved this was a big deal.

The long in the short of it is that the race came down between Cleveland’s Nap Lajoie and Detroit’s Ty Cobb.  There was also some controversy about record keeping for both players at the time.  In the end, American League President Ban Johnson made the final decision and awarded the car to Ty Cobb.  Still surrounded in controversy to this day no one is sure who really one, but Cobb got the car.

Rick Huhn does a really good job of relaying to the reader the course of events of 1910. Individual game details, scoring decisions and events all paint a vivid picture for the reader.  He also details the aftermath of Ban Johnson’s decision and court depositions that show the mess that baseball was in during that time period.  It also gives the reader a real good idea of how fixed baseball was during that time period and how it could have been human error, judgement calls or just plains and simple, the fix was in for the car’s winner that caused this giant mess.

The passage of 100 years clouds some of the details, but the author does a nice job throughout the whole book giving the reader what is to believed to be the complete story.  It is something that we prior to this book did not have great clarification on. This book does that job very well and hopefully can lay to rest the true events of the 1910 season.

If you have an interest in this era check this book out.  It is another book that gives a good feel of what really was going on in baseball during this era.  It also is another book that clarifies some of the Ty Cobb myths.  That is not its main intention, but it is a good side effect.  You just need to be a fan of baseball history to enjoy this one,  it slows down a little bit at the mid point in the book, when it gets bogged down in the court proceedings.  But once you are through that it picks back up and completes its mission.

You can get this book from the nice folks at the University of Nebraska Press

The Chalmers Race

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

The Sizzler-George Sisler, Baseball’s Forgotten Hero


In continuation of the Hall of Fame induction week posts, I thought we would take a look at another Hall of Fame member.  Someone who had a distinguished career and excelled to the top of the game, making an indelible mark for future generations to admire.  This person is also someone that I feel gets forgotten in the shuffle of baseball history and his achievements get lost with the passage of time.  George Sisler is not a name that immediately pops into a fans mind when they think of the Hall of Fame.  He was one of those baseball lifers that worked hard and gave his life to the game he loved.  Fans do get the chance to learn about a baseball great in this book I just finished reading

By:Rick Huhn-2004

By:Rick Huhn-2004

This is not a new book by any stretch of the imagination, having now been around for more than a decade.  The importance of this book is obvious to me though, in the fact is that it pays tribute to a Hall of Fame career and the quality of character that was George Sisler.  Playing mostly for the Browns, then bouncing around at the end of his career, it is important that fans remember who George Sisler was and the level he achieved on the field, and eventually his enshrinement in Cooperstown in 1939.

Rick Huhn walks readers through the story of George Sisler.  Covering his own the field triumphs along with personal moments off the field.  You see the lives of his two young sons (Dick and Dave) who go on to become Major League Baseball players as well and a third son (George Jr.) who had an off field career in baseball as well.  If you dig further into Sisler’s playing career you see he actually did produce some pretty astonishing numbers that have stood the test of time.

Books like this one are a great learning tools for fans through the generations so that important players don’t get forgotten.  In a world where there are twelve Billy Martin biographies and even more about the New York Yankees, it is nice to see a book about a player like this one.  It reminds fans of a simpler time from where the game evolved and the people who sacrificed and produced to help write the game’s history.

RIck Huhn did a very nice job with this book.  At the time of its release, Sisler had passed more than 30 years prior and had not been on the field as a player in almost 75 years.  So it had to be hard to find living friends and people around that witnessed George Sisler first hand.  Huhn’s in-depth research shines through and creates an enjoyable product for fans to both learn from and entertain.  True baseball fans that enjoy the game’s history and like to be educated while they read will really enjoy this book.

You can get this book from the nice folks at the University of Missouri Press

http://press.umsystem.edu/(X(1)S(14xfz0ugtkqus3bnu0e41sug))/product/The-Sizzler,846.aspx

Happy Reading

Gregg