Tagged: Randy Johnson

The Hall – A Celebration of Baseball’s Greats


Choosing the best of the best can really ignite some serious debates.  Who belongs, who doesn’t, who should be eligible and who should not even be there always makes for good conversations among friends.  The Baseball Hall of Fame, which is nestled in that sleepy little town in upstate New York, is the mecca of baseball junkies.  You can walk among some of the greatest artifacts throughout the history of the game as well as visiting the memorials to all the games brightest stars.  If you are not lucky enough to be located within a reasonable distance of the Hall like I am (2 hours), then you may not be able to get there as often as you would like or even at all for that matter.  I found a book, if you are one of the unlucky few that may never get there that will help you experience some of the magical aura that is The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.

The Official 75th Anniversary Book-2014

The Official 75th Anniversary Book 2014

The Baseball Hall of Fame has really published a first-rate book with this one.  The quality of the book alone is incredible.  From the paper stock, to the printing this is a really nice book.  Quality of the book is something I really never comment on, but this one is really that good.

The Hall has compiled all its members, including managers, executives and umpires and given the reader in-depth overviews of every single person.  Each player section is broken down by position into its own chapter and then sorted by induction year.  It has dedicated two pages to each personality and gives a nice biography of their career as well as a brief snippet of that persons unique personality.  It is a nice feature for each person that you don’t always get in these types of books, because it is usually more focused on the career numbers.  Each person’s Hall of Fame plaque also heads their individual page so you are able to read exactly what is hanging on the wall in Cooperstown.

The other nice feature is a several page essay at the beginning of each chapter.  A player from that chapter has written about his own experiences during his career that led him to The Hall of Fame.  It is  something you don’t normally see in a Hall of Fame coffee table book and adds a real human touch to this book.  I think the Hall of Fame sometimes lacks a human touch when speaking about its members, so this brings it back to a very personal and fan friendly level.

This book covers all the players that were enshrined as of the publication date.  The only down side to these types of books is that they are not accurate for very long.  Once the next July rolls around someone is missing.  But honestly this book is done so well it should belong in every fan’s library.  You may be familiar with some of the names, but there are others that are a real learning experience for fans young and old.

You can get this book from the nice folks at Little Brown and Company

http://www.hachettebookgroup.com/titles/the-national-baseball-hall-of-fame-and-museum/the-hall-a-celebration-of-baseballs-greats/9780316213028/

Happy Reading

Gregg

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Pedro – The Mystery Solved


The Baseball Hall of Fame Inductions are complete.  The old members have all stopped by Cooperstown and waved to the fans, welcoming this years class of immortals. The old stories have been swapped, photos have been taken and another year has come and gone of happy times in Cooperstown, Now we look forward to the debates and arguments that will ensue regarding the next class to be enshrined.  One of the more interesting personalities that was part of this years class, is Pedro Martinez.  Pedro came out with a new autobiography this year and it has brought varying degrees of response from the masses, so I figured I should check it out for my blog.

By:Pedro Martinez-2015

By:Pedro Martinez-2015

My first reaction when I heard the release date of this book was, how ironic it was coming out in his Hall of Fame year.  I guess good marketing strategies never sleep.  Pedro had always been a source of controversy to some degree during his career.  Early in his career he picked up the label of head hunter, mainly due to his pitching inside and making sure the batter knew who owned the plate.  For the record I have no problem with that, it is a part of the game that has disappeared through the last few decades and probably something that should find a way to return.  Pedro also had a well-remembered battle with Don Zimmer one time that might have made some highlight films on a few stations.  But on the field it was hard to deny Pedro was an incredible competitor,  No matter where he played you could always see his skill and desire, but now this book gives you the personal side of Pedro.

If you listen to interviews with Pedro, he his a big fan of himself and in this book, he has no reservations in telling you why.  From his on field play, to those people around him Pedro is a guy that demands respect from people and it seems he is not one to shy away from the limelight.  The book starts from his growing up in the Dominican Republic and how he had struggled as a child to be taken seriously as a baseball player.  His brother Ramon, signed by the Dodgers, was Pedro’s ticket to getting a serious look from a big league team.  Pedro walks you through his progression from dim prospect, to major leaguer, to superstar and introduces you to all the people he met in between.  He has a very long memory of those who did him wrong and makes sure you know who they are in this book.

I had read some reviews of this book before I read it, just to see what I was getting myself into.  Many other folks said that Pedro liked to remind the reader how great he really was.  I am not disagreeing that point in any way with this book, but I don’t think it is Pedro being a conceited jerk.  I think it more his immense pride coming through.  He has very strong family roots and pride in his accomplishments.  Also, the points he makes in the book about respect and his troubles along the way with getting any respect, it to me came off as a man with a strong pride.  Now I say all this never being a huge Pedro fan when he was playing.  The only regular first hand account of his playing days I had, where when he played half a season in 2009 for my Phillies.  Even at the end of his career you could see his determination, pride out on the field and his ability to lead by example.  So maybe Pedro isn’t as big of a jerk as some of the other book reviews have made him out to be.

Baseball fans should check this out for themselves.  Maybe I am right or maybe everyone else is, but it’s you job as the reader to make that determination, I am just one guy’s opinion, who found after reading this, a new-found respect for Pedro Martinez.  No for his on the field playing, but for the person he is.

You can get this book from the nice folks at Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

http://www.hmhco.com/shop/books/Pedro/9780544279339

Happy Reading

Gregg