Tagged: Philadelphia A’s

Another Batch From McFarland That is Sure to Please


A few weeks ago we looked at a new batch of books recently published by McFarland.  I touched on the obscure factor that some of their books tend to embrace and how they fill a niche spot in the baseball book market.  Today we are going to look at a few more because honestly McFarland has a little something for every baseball fan.

51cdba5qgkl

By:Richard Bressler-2016

McFarland is always willing to publish team history books.  Looking at both the powerhouse teams that are part of the baseball fabric as well as those that time has essentially forgotten.  The year 1910 was an interesting point for the two teams involved in this volume and shows how it laid the groundwork for a streak that lasts to this day.

The 1910 World Series brought us the end of one dynasty and the birth of another.  The Chicago Cubs, coming off several very successful years and a win in the 1908 series were nearing the end of their reign.  While Connie Mack’s Athletics were poised to start a championship run of their own.  It was a fairly anti-climatic Series, but did offer an interesting historical note.  For the first time in World Series history, game two to be precise, was the first time all nine starters recorded a hit in the same game.  Its a neat little trivia factoid you can now impress all your friends with.

This is a timely book with the Cubs poised to possibly end their World Series drought and also it allows the reader to travel back in time to see an entirely different generation of the game.  Fans of either of these teams or of this era, will not be disappointed in this one.

51tbn84fl

By:Jeremy Lehrman-2016

This one takes a look at the history of the Most Valuable player award in Baseball.  It looks at the voting results and provides current statistical analysis to see what may have been different by todays standards.

It is an interesting view as at what may have been overlooked by voters in the past as well as what other factors may have played into the voting results.  It also shows how race may have been an underlying issue on some of the ballots.  The book is a good mix of history, commentary and statistical analysis.  For fans of these types of “what did we miss books”  this is another one you will really enjoy.

9780786499779_p0_v1_s192x300

By:Brian Martin-2016

Finally, as the title says, Pud Galvin, not only the owner of an odd name was baseball’s first 300 game winner.  Enshrined in the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1965, 63 years after his death, his numerous records and 300+ wins still did not keep him from dying penniless.  One of the first real superstars of the game he had some amazing accomplishments on the field and helped grow the credibility of the early game.

One of the other footnotes to Galvin’s story is he may have been the first user of Performance Enhancing Drugs in Major League Baseball.  An advocate of using a monkey testosterone elixir, it seemed to enhance his on field performance.  The difference from today to over 100 years ago is that everyone was on board with the use of the concoction.  It shows a very different time in Baseball and quite honestly is a very interesting story for fans of the early eras of baseball.

You can check out these books and other great titles offered by this publisher at the following link:

McFarland

Happy Reading

Gregg

Advertisements

Wonder Boy – The Story of Carl Scheib


In my opinion, the arena of Baseball books is in no way an exact science.  There is no rhyme or reason as to what person an author chooses to write about, or which players decide I want to write my own book.  It leaves readers with endless choices and multiple avenues to pursue their favorite subjects.  With all of these choices,  readers may get led down a road that they will regret in the end.  As I have always said, nobody wants to waste time on a bad book.  I wonder which side of the fence today’s book falls into?

wb_fc(2)

By:Lawrence Knorr-2016

Carl Scheib is not a household name like Pete Rose or Babe Ruth, but he did have a professional career playing for both the Philadelphia Athletics and St Louis Cardinals.  Not being Cy Young reincarnated on the mound led me to believe that this book was going to focus more on his personality and less on his lack of pitching prowess. Well……. I was wrong.

Wonder Boy is very heavy in game by game details of Carl Scheib’s professional career.  When I say heavy I mean HEAVY!  After the first few chapters that give you the standard background on the player, family friends, schooling home life etc., it jumps right into his career.  Each chapter tends to cover a full season showing the highlights and lowlights of that year for Scheib.  It also tries to mix in a bit of personal information about Carl in each year but seemed forced and unnatural.

Books about a player from Connie Mack’s A’s, let alone near the end of his regime do not seem like popular subjects.  Probably because the team at that point was operated on such a shoe string budget that the quality of players was not that good.  Which then led to no one really taking an interest in most of the players on a personal level.  It is a double edged sword for the Athletics players in Philadelphia during this era.

If you really, really want to find out information on Carl Scheib this is your only resource right now.  It does offer some personal insight into the man and the player and gives the reader some stories about a man who will eventually be forgotten to time because he played for one of those horrible Connie Mack teams.  Unfortunately for my taste, this book relies to much on game day play by play to fill its pages.

As always, I leave it to you the reader to check it out and see if you agree with me or not, you can get this book from the nice folks at Sunbury Press

Wonder Boy

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

Swish Nicholson-Wartime Baseball’s Leading Slugger


With this week’s Hall of Fame vote finally announced, you get to see how many truly amazing players that played the game.  Every year we fight about the superstars and who deserves to be enshrined this year.  Beyond these greats are the people who are the backbone of the game.  The good and borderline great players who are not Hall worthy but still had really good careers.  There are also the people who had solid days on the field but were honestly nothing memorable otherwise.  For every Hall of Fame caliber player there are hundreds of other players that fell below them in the grand scheme of the game.  It is important that history does not forget these types of players.  Through their hard work and dedication they have helped forge the story of baseball.  Today’s book takes a look at one of those players that had a good career, that while not Hall worthy, still was good enough to be respected and admired by various generations.

51OBvg48XKL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_

By:Robert A. Greenberg-2008

I went into this book only familiar with Swish Nicholson’s time with the Philadelphia Phillies.  A member of the beloved Whiz Kids, he was a name that Phillies fans were accustomed to hearing as one of the Philly greats.  It turns out before Bill ever stopped in my hometown, he had a really incredible career in the Windy City with the Cubs, but was hindered by the fact that his prime was during the height of World War II.  Being a wartime slugger discounted his achievements on the field because the rest of the world felt all the best players were off serving in the military.  This fact created the perception of Swish Nicholson’s career as not being as good as his numbers portrayed, because the competition was not up to its normal MLB standard.

This book makes a very solid attempt at showing Nicholson’s career in the correct light it deserves.  It gives a lot of background on his personal life and growing up in the early 20th century.  The book gives the reader a real feel of what Bill Nicholson was like off the field, as well as what kind of exceptional player he was on it.  This book also shows life after baseball and with older players, I find it interesting to see their transition back into regular life.  It is so different than what modern players have to go through.  It has to be very hard to go from being a star on the field to a regular guy working 9 to 5 and punching a clock.

Book like this are important in that they keep the memories of players whom may not have been Hall of Fame worthy alive in the minds of baseball fans.  Books like this bring the past back to life and show readers various eras of the game they have only heard of through stories of older generations.  Fans should check out Swish Nicholson, it is one of those books that is both entertaining and educational for everyone.

You can get this book from the nice folks at McFarland

“Swish” Nicholson

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

 

The A’s – A Baseball History


It is hard to deny that the Athletics baseball team have a pretty incredible history.  Having called three separate cities home over the course of their existence, they have reached the pinnacle of the game several times over, along with finding the depths of despair.  Some people think of the A’s as three separate teams at each of their locations, but now you can get a book that covers them as one entity.

By: David M. Jordan - 2014

By: David M. Jordan – 2014

David M. Jordan has taken on the task of covering the entire history of the Athletics franchise.  Each location the A’s have called home are covered in this book.  It is easier to find a book that covers one location, but it is I think, harder to find one book to cover their full history.  Jordan covers the history in Philadelphia, Kansas City and Oakland with great detail.  He shows the mainstay personalities that helped create their storied history in each city.  He also covers the championships that have come their way throughout the years.

Books like this are usually for the hard-core fans of that team and this one is no exception.  It gives a lot of detail of certain memorable seasons and glances over the not so memorable ones.  They have a long history that is very hard to cover in a single book, especially when you are trying to cover the time from Connie Mack to Charlie Finley and then on to Billy Ball.   Nonetheless, David M. Jordan does a thorough job and gives the reader a real feel for this teams history.  If you are not very familiar with the A’s complete history, this gives you a good taste of what you have been missing.

If you are a hard-core fan, this is a good book for you.  The reader gets some obscure facts that those type of fans will appreciate. I think if you are a casual fan and looking for a light easy read, this may not be for you.  This book gives a detailed history lesson of the A’s that is hard to beat.  No matter what city that you were a fan of the A’s in, it is worth checking out.

You can get this book from the nice folks at McFarland Publishing

http://www.mcfarlandbooks.com/book-2.php?id=978-0-7864-7781-4

Happy Reading

Gregg

A’s Bad as it Gets – 1916 Philadelphia Athletics


Being born and raised in Philadelphia I believe I have seen some horrible Phillies teams.  Even New York Mets fans can relate to that after being through their inaugural season.  Those teams fail in comparison to the 1916 Philadelphia A’s.  After a final record of 36 wins in a 154 game season, they secured their spot in history.  Which brings us to today’s book….

as bad

A’s Bad as it Gets-Connie Mack’s Pathetic Athletics of 1916

By:John Robertson and Andy Saunders-2014 McFarland

 

Connie Mack, the grand ol’ man of baseball was obviously at the helm of this lackluster team, and even he could not work his magic on this team.  The odd thing about this team was the fact, that in the first half of the decade they were a team of great success.  Perhaps they were cursed, perhaps the penny-pinching ways of Mr. Mack was catching up with them or maybe some undisclosed curse of the A’s in Philadelphia.  Whatever the reason was, this team was horrible!

 

This book starts out giving you some background on the Philadelphia Athletics and some of the triumphs they had in years prior.  The authors then break down a month by month recap of the 1916 season including spring training.  This team seemed doomed from the get go.  Finally, the aftermath of the 1916 season and the lasting effects were analyzed  as to how they effected the subsequent seasons in Philadelphia.  Except for a few seasons of success here and there, this was the first signs of an almost cursed franchise.

 

Personally I think the A’s were the worst team ever.  I know to some degree it has been debated in the baseball realm, but based on winning percentage the 1916 A’s win hands down………hey the A’s finally won something.  I also think it was the result of Mack’s penny-pinching that resulted in such a bad team.  These type of financial moves hindered Mack for most of his remaining time in Philadelphia.

 

Usually books pertaining to this era, I have some trouble getting through, but that was not the case with this one.  The authors were very structured and each chapter was well thought out.  The two authors who hail from Canada were also very well versed in Philadelphia Athletics history.  The relevance of this book shows in the fact that there still has not been a team that played worse than the 1916 A’s almost a full century later.

 

All baseball fans should enjoy this book.  It sheds some light on an important benchmark that still stands with in the game to this day.  I honestly feel that this record will never be broken.  With the quality or lack there of in baseball today, I just don’t see it being possible.  You can’t lose them all in reality.

You can get this from the friendly folks at McFarland Books

McFarland – a leading independent publisher of academic and nonfiction books

Happy Reading

Gregg