Tagged: pete rose

Who Gets a Book-Part II


I asked this question on another post recently and received a litany of great answers.  I am well aware that there really is no criteria to who gets a book, but each of us has their own criteria of what really merits a book.  I for one am not here to pass along my thoughts on the subject because each of us has different views and it becomes a personal choice more than anything else.  I found two books recently that come from two ends of the spectrum on the field, but give the reader a very similar product in the end.

Ralph Mauriello and Ron Fairly have several things in common.  Most notably they are both Dodgers Alumni, and I have noticed the feeling of once a Dodger, always a Dodger.  But their careers took very different paths throughout the years.  While Mauriello had a short stint with the Major League team, he spent the majority of his playing years toiling in the minors, while Fairly put a couple of decades at the big league level with a few different stops around the league.  Now with such different playing careers and reaching different levels of success you would thing the end resulting books of their lives would be wildly different.  I am glad to say that could not be further from the truth.

Now that is not to say that both books are mirror images, but there are certain important qualities that shine through.  They both share their life and career experiences for the reader which helps give a well-rounded view of what they offered on the field.  This comes in especially helpful those readers that may not have been around during their playing days, it paints a picture in your mind of what baseball was like for each author as they made their way along their unique journey.  Both books also illustrate what great men both players were, the humility they had, both on and off the field and the honor it was for both of them to be part of the game they loved.  Family is also an important factor in both men’s lives and it is showcased very clearly in both books.  Finally, both books show what life is like after you are off the field.  While both men have taken very different paths in life you can see the underlying love of the game and the immense pride they both had to be on that field.

When I asked the who deserves a book question previously I thought I had a better handle on the answer .  Today I realize if you have a story to tell, no matter what their contribution to the game was, it’s a story worth telling.  It’s up to the readers to decide which stories that they want to read and what they find worthy of their time.  If it is a 20 year veteran or a cup of coffe player, they still have a lot to offer the readers.   For my money these both books make the cut.

If you like the Dodgers and the early years of California baseball, along with a spattering of stories about celebrities and baseball royalty then these books would be for you.  They both tell great stories throughout flow very nicely and you get two different views of the Once a Dodger Always a Dodger tag.

You can get these great books at the following links:

Ralph Mauriello

Ron Fairly

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

Advertisements

Odds & Ends-Spring 2018 Edition


As we sit here today, Opening Day is only five short days away.  I find that very hard to believe since I am sitting here watching a foot and a half of snow that came three days ago, melt out the window, but I am sure the baseball scheduling Gods have that all figured out.  The Spring edition of Odds and Ends is upon us and while everything we look at today may not be a 2018 new season release, they are still solid books to help the reader wander through the new baseball year.

 

baseball-s-roaring-twenties

Ronald T. Waldo always takes on somewhat obscure era’s and subjects for his books.  It is a good thing because Waldo always shows the reader an almost forgotten era in baseball and brings prominent names back to the forefront.  I like Waldo’s books because his thorough research always shines through in the book and you can rely on the accuracy of the stories he tells the reader.  If you have any sort of interest in 1920’s baseball or want to use this book as a history lesson for yourself, than this book is definitely one you should check out.  You can get this one from the friendly folks at Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.

 

51ut803QrJL__SX334_BO1,204,203,200_

Staying in the same era of baseball, what more can I say about this book that hasn’t already been said.  It has won numerous awards since its release last year and quite honestly deserves every one of them.  Steinberg has done a phenomenal job bringing the life and career of Urban Shocker to the modern day fan.  It gives the reader a glimpse of what baseball was like during that timeframe and makes you realize how even though we are still essentially playing the same game, times have changed dramatically.  For those with an interest in players of the past, the New York Yankees and several other aspects this book presents to the reader, it is worth checking out.  It offers so many levels of information that you will be glad you took the time to read it.  You can get this one from the nice folks at the University of Nebraska Press.

 

51i-AZ3f94L__SX329_BO1,204,203,200_

There have been a few books written by, or about Lou in the past.  For my money, this one is the best of the bunch.  It is updated through the end of his managerial career and into retirement and really gets you to the personal side of Lou Piniella.  It covers his full life and is not really specifically team focused.  It goes through everywhere he stopped during his playing and managing days and really doesn’t pull any punches.  He is telling it like he sees it at this point.  Other books on Lou have been more team or time frame focused, so this one really shows it all.  If you have read the other books, there may be some overlap of information on certain teams but for the grand picture of a career this is your best bet.  Yu can get this one from the nice folks at Harper Collins Publishers.

ImpossDrm_Cvr_eBkFnl

If you have a Yankees book, you should always follow it with a Red Sox book.  1967 seems to be a watershed year for the Sox and always seems to be the year everyone references as the highlight of an era.  It was their first real taste of success after a long drought but it was unfortunately not sustained.  Crehan’s book takes a good look at 1967 and why it is so special to Boston fans and why it was an important year in team history.  For those of us not around then or for those not paying attention to them in 1967 it gives a great look at what happened.  If you are a hardcore BoSox fan, of course you will want to read this, but some of theses stories may be tried and true classics that you love to hear about.   For others, it may be a good learning tool about 1967 and the names that help make this team famous.  You can get this book from the nice folks at Summer Game Books.

51EeOGlWVFL__SX331_BO1,204,203,200_

Where would the game be without the Sportswriters.  They are a vital part of looking at the game and analyzing what transpires on the field.  Jim Kaplan previously has written for Sports Illustrated and has decided to share his thoughts on the history of the game and some of his views of players, on field plays and other aspects we may not have thought about.  Its a fun read and makes you look at things just a little differently than you had before.  You can get this one from the nice folks at Levellers Press.

large

McFarland has never been a publisher that was one to shy away from overlooked players or long forgotten subjects and this one easily falls into that category.  Roy Sievers was a feared hitter during the 50″s but was often overshadowed by the other greats of that decade both on the field and in print.  Finally getting his due in book form, readers can now learn about the great career of one of baseballs most overlooked hitters of that decade as well as learn about an overall pretty nice guy.  Its important that people like this from baseball history don’t get forgotten, and McFarland has done a nice job of helping preserve his legacy by getting this to market.

51iIbWSfqcL__SX331_BO1,204,203,200_

Baseball seems to have a singular year every decade where they shoot themselves in the foot and the 60’s were no exception.  Widely known for being the year of the pitcher, 1968 was the year the powers that be put their dunce caps on once again.  This is a good look at what management was like back in the day and how that has changed as well.  It also shows how baseball has been able to survive and rise above its own stupidity at times.  You can get both of these from the nice folks at McFarland.

So ready or not the new baseball season is upon us, so no matter who you root for we are all in First Place at least for one day.

Happy Reading and Go Phillies!

Gregg


 

Rowman & Littlefield Knocking ’em Out for Baseball Fans


In prior posts we have taken a look at book publishers that dedicate some of their new releases to baseball books.  Baseball is easiest the most popular of the four major sports in regards to books and fans always come through and support the good books.  Rowman & Littlefield is no stranger to the baseball book realm and through the years have produced some great books for the fans enjoyment.  With the pending long, hard winter staring us all in the face I figured now would be a good time to showcase some of R&L’s offering from this past season.  They have a wide array of topics and they are sure to have something for almost every fan longing for baseball.

59143

By:Hal Bock-2016

This book could not have picked a better year to be published.  Having the good fortune to capitalize on the Chicago Cubs breaking the curse that has hampered them for decades.  Noted Historian Hal Bock takes a look at the last Cubs dynasty, you remember that one that came before World War I.  It looks at the powerhouse teams the Cubs were able to produce and how they were one of the most feared teams of their time.  It showcases a colorful cast of characters that called Chicago home and how they were central to the team’s success.  It also provides some rare photos and takes the reader back to a time before the Cubs were the lovable losers.

If anyone really enjoyed this years World Series victory, then they should check this book out.  It transports the reader to a time when World Series victories were the norm for the Cubs, not some sort of a once in a lifetime moment.  A very enjoyable walk down memory lane that is well worth the time reading it.

51fuxxveukl-_sy344_bo1204203200_

By:John A. Wood-2016

Baseball during its history, has been full of characters to say the least.  You could almost classify this book into the good, the bad and the ugly.  Just for good measure you could throw in the sad as well.  It takes a look at players lives outside of the game during their careers as well as their lives after baseball.  The book sticks to legendary names of the game so it is a roster of players most fans are familiar with and possibly will shed some new light on some of their personalities.  It goes well beyond statistics and shows what these guys were like on a man to man level.

It shines a whole new light on the legends of the game and will help readers possibly understand why some of these players did what they did during their lives.  The book covers a wide array of stars and eras so there should be someone in here everybody will relate to, no matter whom your team allegiance lies with.

512p5teaal-_sx334_bo1204203200_

By:Steven Elliott Tripp-2016

The past few years Ty Cobb has been as popular in the baseball book world as ever.  There are contradicting stories about his personality that have arisen over the past few years and has changed the ways in which people perceive Cobb.  No matter where you lie on the subject their is never going to be a definitive answer as to the man’s personality, but that will not stop the book world from trying.

The author takes a unique approach on this one and reviews Cobb’s personality from a rural Southern upbringing and the mentality of the times.  He compares it to the current day expectations of social behavior and shows the differences and transgressions.  Tripp also reviews Cobb’s place as a sports icon in Cultural, Social and Gender histories, both within the game and our country.  It is a unique approach on a man that passed more than a half century ago and sheds some interesting ideas on what Ty Cobb was all about.  Time marches on and so may be the ever changing legacy of Ty Cobb.

51vebwqwg0l

By:Keith Craig-2016

A welcome addition to any fans library is this book.  It is a subject and player that in the past has been overlooked so there is not that much information out there about him.  It looks at Pennock’s stellar career for the pre-dynasty New York Yankees and the contributions he made to the game.  Pennock came within four outs of being the first Pitcher to throw a World Series No-Hitter.  In interviews with family and remaining friends of Pennock, the author paints a vivid picture of a great player and a well liked man.

The book also touches on his second career as General Manager of the Philadelphia Phillies.  It was his work that guided their farm system to new heights and levels of production.  This book was truly a welcomed learning experience for me and would add to any fans arsenal of baseball player knowledge.

515ve5hrhzl

By:Sherman L. Jenkins-2016

Step aside Bo Jackson, Ted Strong Jr., was the original multi-sport superstar.  A player in both the Negro Leagues and a member of the Harlem Globetrotters, Strong could pretty much do it all.  He is a widely overlooked subject in today’s sports realm and this book is reversing that injustice.  This biography shows the readers the determination and sheer guts that drove this man to obtain his goals throughout his life.  Through interviews with family and friends this is another book that sheds light on an often overlooked subject and expands the fans knowledge base of the game.

This is another book that was a welcome learning experience and I think it is very important to remember those who hard work and dedication this game is built upon.  Fans of any league or sport for that matter,  will not be disappointed in this one.

515lkdsotil-_sx312_bo1204203200_

By:Rocco Constantino-2016

Someone sound the subjective alarm, we have reached that point in our book round-up.  These types of books are always of the subjective nature and that is not meant to say any of them are bad by design.  It is just to say that you are falling into the author’s idea of what constitutes a great moment within the game.  I may think one play is more important than another, but in essence it only matters what the author thinks.  These types of books are great for sparking debate among friends and may honestly generate some disputes that are never settled.  It is the design of these books to do this and perhaps to some degree their purpose as well.

Constantino’s book is well written, greatly detailed and he presents concise arguments as to why each of these moments should be considered one of the games 50 greatest ones.  These books are hard for me to review because I don’t always agree with the 50, but the do allow the opportunity to spark some great debates among friends………….so have at it !

51fpb3h8pl

By:Bryan Soderholm-Difatte-2016

Obviously the most important event during the Golden Era was integration.  It changed the landscape of the game and to some degree society as well.  When you see these types of books about this era they are mainly focused on segregation.  While this one does give segregation its due a s a monumental event of the time it also discusses some other events that were taking place in the background of the game.  It was a time when baseball was at the forefront of American society and minor things like a change in the on field strategies, the use of a player/manager and the views of pinch hitters were all happening.  Relief pitchers were evolving, defensive strategies changed and it was all happening right in front of our eyes, the problem was no one was really noticing.

It is a different look at this era than we have seen before and really makes the reader sit up and take notice of what else transpired during one of the most, if not the most important era in the history of the game.

CubasBaseballDefectors

By:Peter Bjarkman-2016

If you have an interest in Cuban baseball, then this is the book you need.  Bjarkman is the end all, be all authority on Cuban baseball.  He knows every inside story on every player in the country and understands the Cuban culture, which allows him to understand the mindset of the players.  He is the man ahead of the headlines and shares with his readers the back stories of the players that have come into the U.S over the past few years, how Cuban baseball factors into the lives of those who live in the country and how baseball has aided in helping the relations between Cuba and the U.S.

This is a very comprehensive work and Bjarkman is second to none on his knowledge of the Cuban game, their players and the proud society of Cuba.  If you want to learn about Cuban baseball, I will say it again, you need not look any farther than here.  Bjarkman has spent 20 plus years on this subject and it shows through in this body of work.

These great baseball titles and lots of others are available from Rowman & Littlefield

Check out their back catalog as well because there are lots of diverse subject on the baseball front there as well.

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

 

Fastball John-An Amazing Life’s Journey


No matter the subject of a baseball biography, there is some sort of story to be told.  Some of these stories are better than others and coincide with the skill level of that particular player. Then there are stories like today’s book that come from an average player that did not put up Hall of Fame numbers, but has a Hall of Fame caliber story to tell baseball fans. A journey that took him all over North America John D’Acquisto’s new book takes a hard and honest look at his life and career and the paths it has led him down.  This honest look at his own life opens up a whole new side of John that fans can appreciate.

41V17-6ob3L

By:John D’Acquisto & Dave Jordan-2016

Fastball John starts the readers on the journey of his life and shows his family roots in San Diego and his journey to become a big league pitcher.  Next you learn first hand what it is like to be a first round draft pick with high expectations in a major league setting.  Stops with major league teams and a few more stints in the minors are covered as well.

John D’Acquisto shows the readers the ins and outs of what being a baseball player is really like.  You see the friendships, the expectations of management, contract disputes and health scares that make up a players life.  What I found really interesting is how personal relationships are intertwined within this story.  It gives a very intimate touch to a career that is usually unable to sustain those types of relationships.  One other factor the the authors were able to incorporate into the story was how the music of the time was able to become part of the moment and permanently ingrained in the memories.

For my money the most interesting part of this story is also one of the saddest.  John D’Acquisto’s life after baseball was one of accusations, falsehoods and betrayal that in the end led to some serious jail time.  John eloquently tells his side of the story of the events that led up to his incarceration and his time behind bars.  The sequence of events that led up to this are almost unbelievable and in the end, when you hear all the details wonder how someone could survive something of this magnitude.  For what it’s worth, I believe D’Acquisto’s side of the story, it unfortunately seems to be him trusting the wrong people at the time and the justice system wanting to make an example of someone with a famous name.

Honestly, we have all read the books written by the Superstars and sometimes pass on the stories of a lower tier player.  This is one of those times you need to make the effort to read the story of that player.  It is a gripping story that shows the genuine side of a Major League Baseball player.  He has had good times and some really bad times, but in the end Johnny D.  comes across as a pretty cool guy.  Loved by the fans of the San Francisco and San Diego, he has paid his dues on both sides of the fence and moved on to well earned greener pastures in his life.  Take the time to read this book and you will be able to see their is still some good left in people and read a very enjoyable baseball book at the same time.

Fastball John

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

 

Dodgerland-Decadent L.A. and the 77-78 Dodgers


Growing up as a Phillies fan in the late 70’s was full of heartbreak, and most of it was at the hands of the Los Angeles Dodgers.  My very first game that I went to at the ripe old age of five was the NLCS at Veterans Stadium against those same hated Dodgers.  That very game helped prepare me for a lifetime of mostly heartbreak brought to me by my beloved Phillies.  Today’s book takes a look at two of the Dodgers powerhouse teams from that era and in particular the 77 and 78 versions that really stuck it to my Phillies.

76d6abd10f69615a979b24e7b37fb412

By:Michael Fallon-2016

Both of these Dodgers teams contained a plethora of homegrown stars.  Ron Cey, Bill Russell, Steve Garvey, Davey Lopes are just a few of the players who came up through the Dodger farm system playing for their now Major League manager Tommy Lasorda.  It helped foster the environment that the Dodgers always outwardly portrayed, that of being one great big happy family.  It created unity and allowed them to play at a level on the field that was matched by very few teams in the league.  Its surprising that it took them until 1981 to finally win a World Championship.

Michael Fallon has written this book in an attempt to showcase the teams of 77-78.  It is a time where the Big Red Machine was on the decline in the N.L. West and the division was ripe for the Dodgers to pick it.  All of their homegrown studs were in their prime and all the stars were aligning for them to become a reigning powerhouse.  It was a great time to be a Dodger fan and embrace the changing of the guard between Alston and Lasorda, and learn the new fast paced ways of the late 70’s

Fallon does tell a good story within these pages and does a nice job relating these facts to the readers.  If you were not around in Los Angeles during these years you get a feel of what the vibe was like there.  In a time before the internet and instant gratification that we exist in now, it is a good throwback to remember the different ways of our world.  It also gives a glimpse of how old school baseball was still alive and well in the game during the late 70’s

The downside of this book for me was being from the other side of the continent I had trouble finding a reason to care about the social activities and politics of Los Angeles.  It was a lot of names that someone outside of California would be able to recognize or even care about, but for local readers it still gave a vision of life outside of baseball in L.A.  My other gripe about this book is that the author at times puts an autobiographical spin on it.  Stories about Dad’s hardware store and things like that really just felt out of place with what it seemed the book was trying to accomplish.  It almost seemed as if the book had a split personality and the two of them did not work well together.  My final gripe is that there were some minor baseball factual errors.  This seems to be a recurring problem in baseball books and I wish the publishers would hire a freelancer or someone like that just to fact check some of these things.  But that really is more of a pet peeve I guess.

Overall its a good baseball book, just be prepared for it to veer off in other directions every so often.  If you can live with that aspect of the book, and you have an interest in the Los Angeles Dodgers, then you will enjoy this book.

You can get this book from the nice folks at University of Nebraska Press

Dodgerland

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

Happy Felsch-Banished Black Sox Center Fielder


Some subjects, no matter how much time passes, will always be allowed to produce new information.  The Black Sox scandal almost a century later is still raising questions among fans and historians alike.  Now we have another book out on the market that helps put to rest some of the questions and clarify some of the finer points of the scandal.

51OcGUVPKLL

By:Thomas Rathkamp-2016

Happy Felsch, was the veteran Center Fielder on that ill fated 1919 Chicago White Sox team.  A man who was no stranger to battles with owner Charles Comisky and his penny pinching ways,  Felsch was looking to get what he deserved financially from the game.  Historians have been unsure if his participation was voluntary or out of fear of reprisal by local gamblers.  Either way he was implicated in the throwing of the World Series.

Felsch was always the most vocal of the participants after the scandal broke and open to talking about it.  Rathkamp’s book looks at a few of the interviews that Happy Felsch gave with some writers in subsequent years and attempts to connect the dots of the Black Sox scandal.  It is a valiant attempt at something that has been attempted many times before.

What this book does is offer another point of view from one of those involved.  We have several books on Shoeless Joe Jackson, Buck Weaver and those that analyze the course of events and the entire World Series, but not much more.  For me it was nice to get a different perspective from a new player in this scandal.  Through these interviews that occurred more than 50 years ago now,  Felsch gives snippets of his view of the events and what transpired and to some degree why he was innocent.

Now here is my problem with the entire Black Sox scandal.  We are at this point, working with documented history from almost a century ago.  We are interpreting conversations and interviews that no one who walks this earth at this point were a part of and are putting our own spin on these events.  Our spin being influenced by our current views and not those of a century ago.  So are we really interpreting their comments as they intended?  For that I am not so sure.  But it takes each reader to interpret what this book offers to the end subject on their own.  I myself like this book on its own,  because it offers a new perspective on the subject, but I am starting to wonder when have we maxed out and learned all we will be able to about the Black Sox scandal?

If you are a fan of this era or the scandal itself, check the book out, I don’t think you will be disappointed.

You can get this book from the nice folks at McFarland

Happy Felsch

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

Wonder Boy – The Story of Carl Scheib


In my opinion, the arena of Baseball books is in no way an exact science.  There is no rhyme or reason as to what person an author chooses to write about, or which players decide I want to write my own book.  It leaves readers with endless choices and multiple avenues to pursue their favorite subjects.  With all of these choices,  readers may get led down a road that they will regret in the end.  As I have always said, nobody wants to waste time on a bad book.  I wonder which side of the fence today’s book falls into?

wb_fc(2)

By:Lawrence Knorr-2016

Carl Scheib is not a household name like Pete Rose or Babe Ruth, but he did have a professional career playing for both the Philadelphia Athletics and St Louis Cardinals.  Not being Cy Young reincarnated on the mound led me to believe that this book was going to focus more on his personality and less on his lack of pitching prowess. Well……. I was wrong.

Wonder Boy is very heavy in game by game details of Carl Scheib’s professional career.  When I say heavy I mean HEAVY!  After the first few chapters that give you the standard background on the player, family friends, schooling home life etc., it jumps right into his career.  Each chapter tends to cover a full season showing the highlights and lowlights of that year for Scheib.  It also tries to mix in a bit of personal information about Carl in each year but seemed forced and unnatural.

Books about a player from Connie Mack’s A’s, let alone near the end of his regime do not seem like popular subjects.  Probably because the team at that point was operated on such a shoe string budget that the quality of players was not that good.  Which then led to no one really taking an interest in most of the players on a personal level.  It is a double edged sword for the Athletics players in Philadelphia during this era.

If you really, really want to find out information on Carl Scheib this is your only resource right now.  It does offer some personal insight into the man and the player and gives the reader some stories about a man who will eventually be forgotten to time because he played for one of those horrible Connie Mack teams.  Unfortunately for my taste, this book relies to much on game day play by play to fill its pages.

As always, I leave it to you the reader to check it out and see if you agree with me or not, you can get this book from the nice folks at Sunbury Press

Wonder Boy

Happy Reading

Gregg