Tagged: orlando cepeda

There’s No Place Like Home

When a team changes cities it is a daunting process.  Ownership has to make sure it crosses all its T’s and dots all its I’s to make sure everything will be to their, and more importantly their fans liking.  No where as near as common place as it once was, team transfers can be a great thing for those involved.  New stadiums, new fan base, a whole new chance to invent yourself and the financial rewards usually aren’t too bad either.  That is just what the New York giants were hoping for with their move to San Francisco.  A shiny new stadium to call home accompanied with lots of parking spaces for ownership to sell each night helped sell them on their new locale.  But sometimes all is not what you hope it will be, and todays book takes a look at the Giants move to California and good or bad, depending on where you stood, their new Home Sweet Home.


We are all well aware of the story of the Dodgers moving to Los Angeles and their conquering of the Southern California market.  Sometimes lost in that great shadow is the Giants, who abandoned the Polo Grounds and the city of New York at the exact same time to help usher in baseball across the continent.  Walter O’Malley was larger than life at times and in that shadow one can understand how Horace Stoneham may have fallen by the wayside.  So with that, it easy to forget the history of the Giants during the first years in California.  Luckily for us this book shows us what it took to get the Giants in place in San Fran and the hopes ownership had for the new frontier.

Robert Garrett does a good job of giving us the background of the team in New York and the situation it found itself in during the late 50’s.  From stadium woes to the personality of Horace Stoneham you get a pretty good feel of what it was like for the team during their waning days in New York.  He shows the courtship of the Giants by a new city and the promises bestowed by the local government, the biggest of all being a new stadium.

Stoneham had a somewhat of a hands off approach to his new stadium as the book shows and it in turn came to bite him in the butt.  Candlestick Park had its own set of issues that are well chronicled in the book which in turn snowballed, enough so that it would essentially destroy many of the dreams of what Stoneham had for this new venture.  In the end it is one of the driving factors that ends the Stoneham ownership of the team.

Next we look at the struggles to find new ownership and the quest to keep the Giants in San Francisco less than twenty years after the had arrived.  Once new ownership was found you see the same struggles of old ownership with the albatross of Candlestick still dangling around its neck.  It shows an interesting look at how baseball operated in regards to stadiums, success at the gate and play on the field.  You see how the Giants, except for a few years as a whole, struggled while they called Candlestick home.  It’s also shown how the people of San Fran really didn’t care if they ever got out of there.

Finally, you see a final change on ownership that get the Giants to a new frontier and a stadium worthwhile of Major League Baseball and the success that comes with that type of arena.   I honestly think this book is a great look at this era of Giants baseball, no matter how bad it was on the field.  It’s a portion of team history that gets overshadowed by the Los Angeles Dodgers moving at the same time, the expansion of baseball and the evolving changes that were going on in both baseball and society.  It proves some dreams take longer than others to come to fruition.

If you have an interest in California baseball during this era this book is definitely worth checking out.  You can get this book from the nice folks at the University of Nebraska Press.

Home Team-The Turbulent History of the S.F. Giants

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The Hall – A Celebration of Baseball’s Greats

Choosing the best of the best can really ignite some serious debates.  Who belongs, who doesn’t, who should be eligible and who should not even be there always makes for good conversations among friends.  The Baseball Hall of Fame, which is nestled in that sleepy little town in upstate New York, is the mecca of baseball junkies.  You can walk among some of the greatest artifacts throughout the history of the game as well as visiting the memorials to all the games brightest stars.  If you are not lucky enough to be located within a reasonable distance of the Hall like I am (2 hours), then you may not be able to get there as often as you would like or even at all for that matter.  I found a book, if you are one of the unlucky few that may never get there that will help you experience some of the magical aura that is The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.

The Official 75th Anniversary Book-2014

The Official 75th Anniversary Book 2014

The Baseball Hall of Fame has really published a first-rate book with this one.  The quality of the book alone is incredible.  From the paper stock, to the printing this is a really nice book.  Quality of the book is something I really never comment on, but this one is really that good.

The Hall has compiled all its members, including managers, executives and umpires and given the reader in-depth overviews of every single person.  Each player section is broken down by position into its own chapter and then sorted by induction year.  It has dedicated two pages to each personality and gives a nice biography of their career as well as a brief snippet of that persons unique personality.  It is a nice feature for each person that you don’t always get in these types of books, because it is usually more focused on the career numbers.  Each person’s Hall of Fame plaque also heads their individual page so you are able to read exactly what is hanging on the wall in Cooperstown.

The other nice feature is a several page essay at the beginning of each chapter.  A player from that chapter has written about his own experiences during his career that led him to The Hall of Fame.  It is  something you don’t normally see in a Hall of Fame coffee table book and adds a real human touch to this book.  I think the Hall of Fame sometimes lacks a human touch when speaking about its members, so this brings it back to a very personal and fan friendly level.

This book covers all the players that were enshrined as of the publication date.  The only down side to these types of books is that they are not accurate for very long.  Once the next July rolls around someone is missing.  But honestly this book is done so well it should belong in every fan’s library.  You may be familiar with some of the names, but there are others that are a real learning experience for fans young and old.

You can get this book from the nice folks at Little Brown and Company


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Tony Oliva – The Life and Times of a Minnesota Twins Legend

Have you ever been the fan of a superstar player, but never felt like you really connected with him.  When we have players that we really like, on some level you feel some sort of connection with them.  Whether it is admiration of their skills, or of the off field personality they have, you need something to hold on to and make that connection.  Such is the case with Tony Oliva and myself.  I always admired his career even though it was over before I could say the word baseball, I still thought he was a pretty great player.  What was missing for me was some sort of wow factor though.  In that vein is where my hopes were lying in todays book, that it would create some sort of better connection for me with Tony.

By:Thom Henninger-2015

By:Thom Henninger-2015

Tony Oliva could be considered the King of Minnesota.  Playing a majority of his career with the Twins, he is respected and loved above almost all others.  Being from outside Minnesota I have heard all the stories and highlights of his career.  But for me there was never any feeling of connection with Oliva that I have with some other players that I had never seen.  Perhaps it is Oliva’s low-key personality that didn’t get him the limelight of other Hall of Famers, or maybe it was the fact that he played in Minnesota and became a symbol of greatness for a team that is largely forgotten at times.  So I was going into this book hoping for something that would improve my feelings toward Oliva.

Thom Henninger does a really nice job in this book at portraying the career of Tony Oliva, from his beginnings in Washington D.C. to the end of his career as an on field legend.  The author shows the ups and downs of his storied career and some of the experiences that helped shape Oliva’s personality.  The reader gets to see some personal tribulations that you would not see if you followed only his on field accomplishments.  It is a very well-rounded biography that are the results of in-depth research and tireless fact checking.

The down side to this book for me is that I don’t feel I got any sort of new information on a personal level.  When I read a biography I want to feel that I made a personal connection of some sort with the subject or could relate to the situation at hand.  As I said above it is a well-rounded biography, but to me came off very dry on the personal level.  It seems to be a very strict agenda of stick to the on-field activities and don’t reveal anything new about Tony Oliva, if it can be avoided.  So for me after reading this the legend remained intact and nothing was gained for me as a fan.  There is the old publishing saying – If the legend is more interesting than the facts…….print the legend.

Henninger’s writing style was enjoyable and moved along at a good pace.  I am just unsure as to why we got nothing new.  Perhaps it is the subject matter that keeps himself very guarded and won’t allow the world to see more, or maybe there really isn’t anymore to get.  I as a fan may never know, but in the end I was a little disappointed because I was hoping to get a bigger piece of what is the Tony Oliva legend.

If you are a fan of Oliva then you should check it out.  Maybe I am missing something hardcore Minnesota fans will only be able to find.  Perhaps I expect too much out of a biography, but I really don’t get disappointed by a lot of them, so I am not 100% sold on the fact that I am to blame here.

You can get this book from the nice folks at the University of Minnesota Press


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The Orlando Cepeda Story

When one thinks of under rated players lots of guys come to mind.  When that happens, which it seems to a lot, perhaps they get overlooked for earned accolades such as the Hall of Fame.  Luckily for some of those players they get the credit they deserved, while others just get forgotten.  Orlando Cepeda was always a player I thought was overlooked.  For what ever the reasons may be he always seemed to be forgotten in the conversations about the greats of the game.  It seems since his induction to the Hall of Fame that he has finally gotten the accolades he deserves.  Today’s book takes a look at that overlooked Hall of Fame career.


By:Bruce Markusen-2001

By far this is not a new release, but Cepeda seems to be a neglected subject in the book market.  There are only a handful of Orlando Cepeda books out there but this one stands tall among the others.  As always, Bruce Markusen does not disappoint.

Markusen’s book takes a very in-depth look at both Cepeda’s childhood and career development along with his MLB career.  From his upbringing in Puerto Rico and growing up in the shadow of his father who was a former semi-pro player to becoming a star in his own right in his homeland, you see the environment that helped shape the man.  You also get to see the immense pride that Cepeda has within himself and his country.

You next see the struggles Orlando overcomes in reaching the major leagues.  At the time he came up, there were still residual effects of segregation effecting the Latino players, so you see how Cepeda was able to overcome these obstacles as well.  From the start with the Giants in 1958, through the end with the Royals in 1974, Markusen takes us on Orlando’s journey through playing time, injuries, trades, the post season and winter ball.  It shows a very complete picture of Orlando’s career.  It also shows the reader some of the labels he was saddled with throughout the league that were not always positive.  Injuries proved troublesome for him that got him the label of lazy and others along that line.  These types of things helped keep Orlando Cepeda under rated as well.

Finally the author looks at Cepeda’s life after baseball.  It briefly talks about his time in prison and how it effected his life. The one positive that has come out of his prison time is that it seems to have changed Orlando for the positive and he has in the end turned his life around for the better.  It was also this jail time that probably led to him not getting in the Hall of Fame for as long as he did.

Markusen’s book tells a very good story about Cepeda and his life.  The only problem I have with it is that it is only 126 pages.  I would have liked to see it talk a little more about life after baseball with some more pages.  Even though it is short, it is still a very good book that paints a good picture for the readers.

You can get this book from the nice folks at Arte Publico Press


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