Tagged: New York

Who Gets a Book-Part II


I asked this question on another post recently and received a litany of great answers.  I am well aware that there really is no criteria to who gets a book, but each of us has their own criteria of what really merits a book.  I for one am not here to pass along my thoughts on the subject because each of us has different views and it becomes a personal choice more than anything else.  I found two books recently that come from two ends of the spectrum on the field, but give the reader a very similar product in the end.

Ralph Mauriello and Ron Fairly have several things in common.  Most notably they are both Dodgers Alumni, and I have noticed the feeling of once a Dodger, always a Dodger.  But their careers took very different paths throughout the years.  While Mauriello had a short stint with the Major League team, he spent the majority of his playing years toiling in the minors, while Fairly put a couple of decades at the big league level with a few different stops around the league.  Now with such different playing careers and reaching different levels of success you would thing the end resulting books of their lives would be wildly different.  I am glad to say that could not be further from the truth.

Now that is not to say that both books are mirror images, but there are certain important qualities that shine through.  They both share their life and career experiences for the reader which helps give a well-rounded view of what they offered on the field.  This comes in especially helpful those readers that may not have been around during their playing days, it paints a picture in your mind of what baseball was like for each author as they made their way along their unique journey.  Both books also illustrate what great men both players were, the humility they had, both on and off the field and the honor it was for both of them to be part of the game they loved.  Family is also an important factor in both men’s lives and it is showcased very clearly in both books.  Finally, both books show what life is like after you are off the field.  While both men have taken very different paths in life you can see the underlying love of the game and the immense pride they both had to be on that field.

When I asked the who deserves a book question previously I thought I had a better handle on the answer .  Today I realize if you have a story to tell, no matter what their contribution to the game was, it’s a story worth telling.  It’s up to the readers to decide which stories that they want to read and what they find worthy of their time.  If it is a 20 year veteran or a cup of coffe player, they still have a lot to offer the readers.   For my money these both books make the cut.

If you like the Dodgers and the early years of California baseball, along with a spattering of stories about celebrities and baseball royalty then these books would be for you.  They both tell great stories throughout flow very nicely and you get two different views of the Once a Dodger Always a Dodger tag.

You can get these great books at the following links:

Ralph Mauriello

Ron Fairly

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

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There’s No Place Like Home


When a team changes cities it is a daunting process.  Ownership has to make sure it crosses all its T’s and dots all its I’s to make sure everything will be to their, and more importantly their fans liking.  No where as near as common place as it once was, team transfers can be a great thing for those involved.  New stadiums, new fan base, a whole new chance to invent yourself and the financial rewards usually aren’t too bad either.  That is just what the New York giants were hoping for with their move to San Francisco.  A shiny new stadium to call home accompanied with lots of parking spaces for ownership to sell each night helped sell them on their new locale.  But sometimes all is not what you hope it will be, and todays book takes a look at the Giants move to California and good or bad, depending on where you stood, their new Home Sweet Home.

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We are all well aware of the story of the Dodgers moving to Los Angeles and their conquering of the Southern California market.  Sometimes lost in that great shadow is the Giants, who abandoned the Polo Grounds and the city of New York at the exact same time to help usher in baseball across the continent.  Walter O’Malley was larger than life at times and in that shadow one can understand how Horace Stoneham may have fallen by the wayside.  So with that, it easy to forget the history of the Giants during the first years in California.  Luckily for us this book shows us what it took to get the Giants in place in San Fran and the hopes ownership had for the new frontier.

Robert Garrett does a good job of giving us the background of the team in New York and the situation it found itself in during the late 50’s.  From stadium woes to the personality of Horace Stoneham you get a pretty good feel of what it was like for the team during their waning days in New York.  He shows the courtship of the Giants by a new city and the promises bestowed by the local government, the biggest of all being a new stadium.

Stoneham had a somewhat of a hands off approach to his new stadium as the book shows and it in turn came to bite him in the butt.  Candlestick Park had its own set of issues that are well chronicled in the book which in turn snowballed, enough so that it would essentially destroy many of the dreams of what Stoneham had for this new venture.  In the end it is one of the driving factors that ends the Stoneham ownership of the team.

Next we look at the struggles to find new ownership and the quest to keep the Giants in San Francisco less than twenty years after the had arrived.  Once new ownership was found you see the same struggles of old ownership with the albatross of Candlestick still dangling around its neck.  It shows an interesting look at how baseball operated in regards to stadiums, success at the gate and play on the field.  You see how the Giants, except for a few years as a whole, struggled while they called Candlestick home.  It’s also shown how the people of San Fran really didn’t care if they ever got out of there.

Finally, you see a final change on ownership that get the Giants to a new frontier and a stadium worthwhile of Major League Baseball and the success that comes with that type of arena.   I honestly think this book is a great look at this era of Giants baseball, no matter how bad it was on the field.  It’s a portion of team history that gets overshadowed by the Los Angeles Dodgers moving at the same time, the expansion of baseball and the evolving changes that were going on in both baseball and society.  It proves some dreams take longer than others to come to fruition.

If you have an interest in California baseball during this era this book is definitely worth checking out.  You can get this book from the nice folks at the University of Nebraska Press.

Home Team-The Turbulent History of the S.F. Giants

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

 

 

 

 

Keeping a Lost Franchise Alive


Every once in a while in baseball we lose a team.  Good or bad, there are lots of reasons why this usually happens.  Most recently over a decade ago, the Montreal Expos disappeared from the baseball landscape and some folks are rightfully so, still up in arms about it.  The longer a team is gone, the more time marches on and the more that team inevitably slips from memory.  I have witnessed this first hand in my area with the Philadelphia Athletics Historical society.  The people who saw them play first hand aged and passed on and the memories and interest faded despite folks best efforts.

The St Louis Browns have been gone for over 60 years now and probably most of the people who had seen them first hand have passed on at this point.  So more than likely, other than the hard-core baseball fans, people don’t have as much of an interest in the team or its history.  Today I have a book that does a very nice job of introducing a new wave of fans to a team of yesteryear and hopefully help keep their legacy alive.

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The St. Louis Browns were in a tough spot.  Fighting for fans loyalty in a baseball crazy town with the Cardinals was no easy task.  In the end we all know how it worked out, the left St Louis and pitched their new tent in Baltimore with a brand new name.  They were not always the door mats of baseball as some would have you believe.  There were plenty of good times in the early years, but in the end the battle with the Cardinals for supremacy just became too much.

This book is a great look into those wonder years in St Louis.  It takes an in-depth look at the teams roots, its early success and its fights for league supremacy.  It is a great learning tool for those that are not familiar with their history or the people who wore the uniform through the years.

The Browns were more than just Bill Veeck and his ahead of the curve promotions.  More than just an aging ballpark, more than tiny batters and all those things everyone is familiar with.  For the new generation of baseball fans this is huge opportunity to learn about a team that has fallen from the landscape but never from the fabric of the game.  If we as the generations of fans, post Browns baseball do not take the time to learn about them now, then we risk losing them to the passage of time.   This has happened to other teams throughout history and I would for one be very sad to see this happen to the Browns and their storied past.

You can get this book from the nice folks at Reedy Press

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

 

Ken Boyer-All Star, MVP, Captain


It is a very sad fact that no matter how good a player is or was, they sometimes get forgotten in baseball history.  Flashier, louder and more savvy players come along and steal the spotlight while these great players just go about their business playing the game.  This also extends to other arenas like the Hall of Fame, because some players get forgotten by the voters in Cooperstown as well.  Baseball publishing is another area where so many of the stories that should be told, if for no other reason than preservation of the game’s history, usually are not.  Ken Boyer is one of those players that had an incredible career, but truly never got any of the written credit he deserved.  Boyer recently shared a book about himself and his siblings and a few books aimed at the juvenile set were published during his career, but up until now he has never gotten the book he really deserved.  Kevin McCann has published the book that baseball fans have been wanting and waiting for about Ken Boyer.

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By:Kevin D. McCann-2016

Ken Boyer was a staple of St. Louis Cardinals baseball for a long time.  Receiver of numerous accolades during his career, he was the type of baseball player parents were glad that their kids looked up to.  For some reason throughout time, Boyer never got the recognition he deserved form historians.  Perhaps it was his low key demeanor and how he went about his business or some other unknown reason, but it really is a shame the world has not recognized his talents.

Kevin McCann has produced a real gem with this book.  He takes a look at Boyer’s early life and how his early life struggles helped forge the strong personality that his was.  He also takes a look at Boyer’s climb up the baseball ladder.  Experiences in the Minor Leagues all added to the personality that eventually shone through in St. Louis.

McCann also takes the reader on a journey along with Ken Boyer through his impressive time manning Third Base for the Cardinals.  World Series triumphs, All-Star Games and an MVP award just to keep it interesting were all bestowed upon Boyer while manning the hot corner.  Next he takes you through the winding down portion of his career with stops with the Mets, White Sox and Dodgers.  But the journey doesn’t stop there with Boyer.  The author shows us the steps Boyer took to remain in baseball.  By starting at the bottom and working his way back up again, he was able to take over the managerial reigns of the Cardinals for a while with limited success before his untimely death in 1982.

Finally McCann makes a solid case for Boyer’s inclusion in the Baseball Hall of Fame. Honestly if you can make a solid case to have Ron Santo in the Hall  at this point then Ken Boyer is a no-brainer for induction.  For some reason baseball has overlooked Boyer’s career and has shown to some degree the flaws with the Hall of Fame voting system.

McCann has written a great book with this one.  The writing style flows smoothly, moves fast and makes the reader feel like they were actually there.  It is a great story that I for one am glad is finally being told on the level it deserves.  The book is very hard to put down once you get started.

Baseball fans should check this one regardless of team allegiance.  It is a player that should be given the historical respect he deserves and hopefully this book takes an important step forward in gaining recognition for the legacy Ken Boyer left behind.

You can get this book from the nice folks at BrayBree Publishing

Ken Boyer-All-Star, MVP, Captain

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

Swish Nicholson-Wartime Baseball’s Leading Slugger


With this week’s Hall of Fame vote finally announced, you get to see how many truly amazing players that played the game.  Every year we fight about the superstars and who deserves to be enshrined this year.  Beyond these greats are the people who are the backbone of the game.  The good and borderline great players who are not Hall worthy but still had really good careers.  There are also the people who had solid days on the field but were honestly nothing memorable otherwise.  For every Hall of Fame caliber player there are hundreds of other players that fell below them in the grand scheme of the game.  It is important that history does not forget these types of players.  Through their hard work and dedication they have helped forge the story of baseball.  Today’s book takes a look at one of those players that had a good career, that while not Hall worthy, still was good enough to be respected and admired by various generations.

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By:Robert A. Greenberg-2008

I went into this book only familiar with Swish Nicholson’s time with the Philadelphia Phillies.  A member of the beloved Whiz Kids, he was a name that Phillies fans were accustomed to hearing as one of the Philly greats.  It turns out before Bill ever stopped in my hometown, he had a really incredible career in the Windy City with the Cubs, but was hindered by the fact that his prime was during the height of World War II.  Being a wartime slugger discounted his achievements on the field because the rest of the world felt all the best players were off serving in the military.  This fact created the perception of Swish Nicholson’s career as not being as good as his numbers portrayed, because the competition was not up to its normal MLB standard.

This book makes a very solid attempt at showing Nicholson’s career in the correct light it deserves.  It gives a lot of background on his personal life and growing up in the early 20th century.  The book gives the reader a real feel of what Bill Nicholson was like off the field, as well as what kind of exceptional player he was on it.  This book also shows life after baseball and with older players, I find it interesting to see their transition back into regular life.  It is so different than what modern players have to go through.  It has to be very hard to go from being a star on the field to a regular guy working 9 to 5 and punching a clock.

Book like this are important in that they keep the memories of players whom may not have been Hall of Fame worthy alive in the minds of baseball fans.  Books like this bring the past back to life and show readers various eras of the game they have only heard of through stories of older generations.  Fans should check out Swish Nicholson, it is one of those books that is both entertaining and educational for everyone.

You can get this book from the nice folks at McFarland

“Swish” Nicholson

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

 

Mets Journal – Year by Year with the New York Mets Since 1962


Much to most of baseballs surprise, it is the first week of September and the New York Mets have a tight grip on first place in the National League East.  Mets fans will understand if the rest of the world says talk to us in a month when all the dust has settled and see where you are. Baseball is a game that you never count your chickens before they hatch.  The Mets have been down this road during their history and it has not always been the best of outcomes for them.  Now there is a book that helps Mets fans relive the highs, lows and spectacular events that make them proud to be called fans of the Metropolitans.

By: John Snyder - 2011

By: John Snyder – 2011

Some years it is harder to be a fan of the Mets than it is in others.  From collapses, bad free agent signings, financial scandals and that pesky Bobby Bonilla contract that they are paying on until sometime during the 26th century, it can be tough to be faithful.  Mets fans have proven their loyalty to their team and are being rewarded handsomely for it this year.  Their team history has not always been the greatest either, from their inaugural 120-loss season to a few World Championships in-between, they still have a rich history that is worth celebrating.

John Snyder has written a fun book for New York Mets fans.  It covers the entire team history from 1962 through 2010.  It covers every facet of the team you could imagine, and breaks each year into segments.  Team rosters, statistical leaders, final standings, attendance and a nice little one sentence synopsis that sums up the teams entire season.  Next it presents in chronological order any of the important things that happened on or off the field that year that pertained to the Mets.  Finally at the end of each chapter it relays an anecdote that pertains to that individual season.  If you are trying to brush up on your team history, this book is really a fun way to approach it.

Mets fans obviously will enjoy this book.  You can re-live memories or even learn about some years you may have been on sabbatical from your favorite team.  Yes, that last sentence happens to most fans at one point or another.  Fans of other teams who are not crazy about the Mets could use this book as a learning tool to gain some insight on team history.  Also the author has published other team journals of this type, so your team may be represented by one of those volumes.

You can get this book from the nice folks at Clerisy Press

https://www.clerisypress.com/product.php?productid=17001

Happy Reading

Gregg

Core Four – The Heart and Soul of the Yankees Dynasty


Lets face it.  The New York Yankees have always been the prettiest girl at the dance, the prom queen and grandma’s favorite at Thanksgiving dinner.  They get all the ink in the press, they get all the big impact free agents, and have a seemingly endless supply of money.  These reasons above have given fans plenty of reasons to hate the Bronx Bombers.  In the course of winning 27 World Championships the Yankees have had the occasion to create more than one dynasty in New York.  Today’s book takes at the most recent dynasty assembled in the Big Apple,  down to its very core.

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By:Phil Pepe – 2013 Triumph Books

The last thing I want to do when I find time to read a book, is partake in the Yankees propaganda machine.  After the 2014 grand retirement extravaganza that was Derek Jeter, I as a fan was tired.  I more wanted to find a book that would make me enjoy the good old days of the recent Yankees without finding out why Derek Jeter was the best player ever.  Even though Jeter is part of today’s book, it thankfully wasn’t dominated by Derek.

Core Four takes a look at the roads traveled by the four main players that were members of the Yankees new millennium dynasty.  While that dynasty actually started in 1996, it carried over into the 21st century, so I figured that was the easiest way to categorize it.  The book looks at Jorge Posada, Andy Pettitte, Mariano Rivera and of course Derek Jeter.  It shows the journey each of them made in their private lives to get to professional baseball,  their minor league journeys, as well as their pecking orders in the Yankees minor league system.  Finally our core four move to the majors and you review each of their individual accomplishments.

The part of the book I found most interesting was the way that these four players were present for a substantial period of success in Yankees history.  Six pennants and four World Series over the course of eight seasons while these four called each other teammates.  That in itself is nothing to sneeze at.  But you also see how as some of these pieces moved on to other teams how the Yankees suffered.  It is a really interesting look at how the foundation of that dynasty was assembled and how it functioned.

Some people enjoy Phil Pepe’s writings, and I am one of them.  He is obviously New York biased which is fine if you accept that fact before you start reading the book.  This is another stellar effort on his part in the telling of the Yankees dynasty and New York fans should really enjoy it.

You can get this book from the nice folks at Triumph Books

http://www.triumphbooks.com

Happy Reading

Gregg