Tagged: national league

Sports Publishing Coming Through for Baseball Fans


We have seen in the last few posts how certain publishers focus on baseball fans and really provide a great selection for them.  As we head into the pending long, hard winter, I figured it is always a good idea to showcase a few more publishers that take care of the fans and get us to our awaited destination, the first pitch of Spring.  Sports publishing has long been a staple of baseball book publishers and offers a diverse catalog for fans.  They offer multiple sports, but for me it’s all baseball or bust.  Historical, team related, biographical, new release or not, there always is something that fans can find that will appeal to everyone.

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By:Rich Westcott-2014

While this is not a new release, it still is a great look at the most vital position on the field, the Pitcher.  By going through the entire history of baseball, Westcott gives the reader some of the most memorable feats performed by Pitchers.  Heroes of the game such as Waddell, Chesbro, Cy Young and Mathewson through modern day greats like Ryan, Seaver, Carlton, Maddux and Randy Johnson all get their due.  It is a nice mix of various pitching accomplishments that have help build the history of the game.  51 chapters covering one position is a lot of memorable feats for the reader, and also introduces them to some not so mainstream stories.  Check this book out if you want to expand your knowledge of the game’s history and see the value that the Pitcher has added to our great game.

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By: Shifrin & Shea-2016

Lets face it, the Home Run is one of the coolest aspects of the game.  It can change the entire momentum of a game, series or even a season.  There is a reason we keep so many Home Run records and why we still are arguing who is the real Home Run King.  There are easily more than 101 home runs that one can call to mind but this is one of those books that narrows it to a certain number.  The one thing the reader has to remember is that they will not always agree with the 101 that were picked.  So it offers some debate material for you and your friends to discuss over a few beers, but in the end, everyone’s list will be different.  The authors give a nice sampling of Homers and it allows the readers to re-live some of the greatest moments in the game’s history.  But in the end, someone, somewhere is going to disagree with at least 1/3 of the picks.  So keep an open mind going into this one.

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By:David Finoli-2016

There was a post in a Facebook group this week asking about this series of books.  It is a very interesting series that puts a unique spin on your favorite team.  The Pittsburgh Pirates book above is the latest in the series and offers you the worst players to wear certain uniform numbers, statistics and history base off the numbers as well as first home runs by certain numbers.  There are so many various things they offer related to the numbers that it is almost impossible not to enjoy these books.  If you are a fan of a certain team you will enjoy this series immensely.  Check out Sports Publishing’s web site for their other team offerings.

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By: Tim Hornbaker-2016

We are all familiar with the Black Sox scandal of 1919 so no need to rehash it here.  I tend to shy away from the Joe Jackson books at this point because I am not really sure if I am going to get anything new from reading another one.  Well I am glad to say Hornbaker has given me a more complete picture of Joe Jackson than I ever had before.  He looks at his time prior to joining the Chicago White Sox and his career blossoming career in Cleveland.  It paints a much broader picture of the center focal point of the Black Sox scandal and an further understanding of the real Joe Jackson.  No matter what side of the scandal you sit on, this book is worth taking a look at.  It provides some new perspectives of all events of Jackson’s career and life.

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By: Tim Hornbaker-2015

I wonder honestly if Ty Cobb gets more coverage now than he did while he was alive.  He also is a very tough market to write a book during the last few years.  Hornbaker’s book is another in a long line of recent Cobb themed books and like his Joe Jackson book provides a different perspective on the Hall of Famer.  As always it is up to the reader to decide what is fact and what is legend, but the author does an admirable job at presenting alternative truths about Cobb.  It is worth the time to read but in the end, the reader has to make the decision which one of the Cobb books presents the most truth.  After all the books, both fact and fiction,  that have addressed Cobb, it is going to be hard for readers to ever figure out what Cobb’s true story actually is.

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By:Rich Westcott-2016

Finally, we take a look at one of my hometown favorites.  This book covers more than just baseball and usually I don’t touch these book on here,(see my disclaimer above), but hey……….it’s Philly!  It takes a thorough look at Philadelphia and the Championships we have been lucky enough to celebrate through the years.  Baseball, Basketball, Football and Hockey are covered as well as showing the transition from a town built on Dynasties to a town laden in a Championship drought for so many years.  It events like these that helped shaped me as the sports fan I am today.  It also shows that the Philly fans may not be as bad as we are always portrayed.

Take the time to check the books out on Sports Publishing’s website.  They have these and many other great baseball books that are sure to please everyone.

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

The Great Baseball Revolt-The Rise and Fall of the 1890 Players League


If you look at baseball history as a whole, it encompasses a large amount of time. Thousands of people and events are all part of the greater story for thousands of reasons. Some of those events get lost to the passage of time, and rightly so.  Just because an event happened does not mean it had any significance to the history of the game itself, it was just the action within the game.  Some events have been suppressed from the history books, for selfish reasons by those involved.  Today’s book takes a look at one of those events and how they helped shape the game as it now known.

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By Robert Ross-2016

Robert Ross has done some heavy lifting with producing this book.  He takes a look at the 1890 Players League that was formed as a rival league to the existing National League.  It offered better salaries and player shares of ownership to play in the league.  This was in contrast to the business dealings of the National league already in existence.  It also allowed the Players League to outdraw the Nationals by the end of the season.  It is a valuable history lesson and shows the power the players have always had and what ownership would like to keep quiet.

This is truly one of the earliest player labor organization movements in the history of the game.  They organized, had some backers and on most fronts were a success.  While their success was for only one year, it shows the powers that the players held and what obstacles they could overcome if they worked together.  In the end it was the fact that National League owners inflated their attendance numbers and cooked their books to the point that it made the Players League look inept.  In the end that was the main downfall of the Players League.

After this failure the Owners held the upper hand for generations and the formation  of the Major League Baseball Players Association almost 75 years later was the first real inroad the players made toward leveling the field with Ownership.  This is where it would have been a benefit to former players to be students of the game.  If they realized they held the power and had banned together sooner, they could have realized better pay and individual rights sooner than they had.  This whole theory could have changed the way free agency came about and would have revolutionized the entire game sooner.

If you have any interest in the labor side of baseball, or rival league history  this book would be a good choice for you.  Yes it happened over a century ago, but it definitely is something that could have changed the direction labor relations took over the past 115 years.  This is one of those history lessons ownership to this day would like to under cover.  Because even today some of these principles could be used to the players benefit.

You can get this book from the nice folks at the University of Nebraska Press

The Great Baseball Revolt

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

They Call Me Oil Can – Baseball, Drugs and Life on the Edge


Even though baseball players are constantly in the public eye, it does not mean you always get one hundred percent of the details.  Almost every players image until recently was a product of their teams media relations department. They would work tirelessly to keep certain issues and events out of the public eye.  In the advent of our instant media society some of the demons escape long before anyone on the team knows anything about them.  Such is the tale of todays book.  Oil Can Boyd was a rising star but you never knew about all of the demons lurking inside his soul.

By: Dennis Oil Can Boyd - 2012

By: Dennis Oil Can Boyd – 2012

Dennis Boyd was a superstar not long into his career.  With a nickname like Oil Can, he was bound to be a fan favorite in Boston.  Underneath the smiling surface were demons that were gnawing away at the star pitcher and made his life difficult at the very least.  Being under the sports microscope that Boston is probably didn’t help Boyd’s problems and the end results were more than likely etched in stone long before anyone realized.

A product of the deep south, Dennis Boyd was a youngster when racism was rampant.  Events that occurred during his upbringing did a lot of damage in shaping the man he became.  You can see that many of these events effected the way he approached his own life and how he dealt with people, thus the outcomes that occurred during his career. These same feelings towards the world around him also show how it led him into a life of drugs that damaged his career and relationships with those close to him.

By far Dennis Boyd does not come out of this book looking like a villan or a victim.  He comes across as an honest caring man who just wants to be accepted for who he is.  Unfortunately, it is one of those circumstances in life that his surroundings have effected him so deeply that he used the only outlets he felt were available.   The book is his honest account of what he feels life has dealt him, and it seems he is not holding anything back.  After reading this book I think I have a better understanding of what makes Oil Can tick, and it seems he is a half decent guy that just had some bad breaks.  My personal view of him has improved through reading this book and I don’t think he is really the head case that the media had made him out to be.

Red Sox and Expos fans will love this book, just because of the team connection.  I think fans in general may like it as well because the book is very honest.  It does not pull any punches and Dennis Boyd becomes a better stronger man as the book progresses.  Even if you hated Oil Can it might be worth checking out because you perception of him may change by the end.

You can get this book from the nice folks at Triumph Books

They Call Me Oil Can

Happy Reading

Gregg

Billy Williams – My Sweet-Swinging Lifetime With the Cubs


There are certain players that have incredible careers, but somehow fall into the background.  Perhaps they are overshadowed by a more popular teammate, or their personalities are the type that naturally keep them out of the limelight.  When you think of the Chicago Cubs, most people automatically think of Ernie Banks.  Mr.Cub as he was affectionately known, basically owned Chicago.  He could do no wrong as far as Cubs fans are concerned and every teammate of that era was subject to living in Ernie’s shadow.  The subject of todays book is one of those teammates that had a Hall of Fame career that was just as good as Mr. Cubs, but is not always at the forefront of the conversation when you talk about the stars of Wrigley.

By: Billy Williams-2008

By: Billy Williams-2008

From his roots in the Negro Leagues to his final destination in Cooperstown, Billy Williams had a very nice career.  He crossed paths with some of the games immortals as well as etching his own name among them.  If Williams had played for almost any other team in baseball during his era except maybe the Yankees, he would have been the toast of that town.  He played almost his entire career behind Ernie Banks who had Chicago wrapped around his finger, so Billy sometimes becomes an afterthought.  That fact alone is hard to comprehend because he put up career numbers that easily gained him acceptance to the Baseball Hall of Fame.

Billy Williams book is a nice light reader that walks you through his career.  From his early start in the Negro Leagues as well as the Minor Leagues you see the personal and professional obstacles he had to overcome to reach his goal.  Many of the struggles were socially accepted at the time but were still a lot for any individual to handle.  He also shows the reader the steps needed to make it and stay in the majors for any young player at that time wanting to be a Cub.

A majority of the book is obviously spent covering his time as a Chicago Cub.  While the team had trouble finding any sort of success on the field, it still comes across as a great time to be a Cub player or fan during a great era of baseball.  The book also covers his brief stay with the Oakland A’s and the bizarre dealings with Charlie Finley.  Finally it finishes up with his induction to Cooperstown and his life with his family after baseball.

If you are looking for sordid behind the scenes details of the life of a baseball player, this is not the book for you.  If you are looking for nice, light and easy reading about a sometimes forgotten but nonetheless loved superstar of the Chicago Cubs, then you should take a look at this one.  I learned a few things about Billy Williams on both the personal and professional level in this one and in the end think better of him as both a player and a man.  All baseball fans will enjoy this book, even those outside of the Windy City.

You can get this book from the nice folks at Triumph Books

http://www.triumphbooks.com/billy-williams-products-9781600780509.php

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

 

 

The Little General – Gene Mauch A Baseball Life


I think there are many great injustices within the game of baseball.  From plays on the field that get called incorrectly to the many talented people who fall into the cracks of history.  There are too many baseball professionals that give their entire lives and every fiber of their beings to the game and in return do not receive the accolades they truly deserve.  Managers sometimes are a bunch that gets forgotten if they do not reach the pinnacle of the game.  Regardless of how they perform over their entire career, if they don’t win a World Series, they usually get forgotten when speaking of the greats.  Todays book takes a look at one of those people who truly was a great manager and gets forgotten when the conversation turns to Baseballs Greatest Managers.

By:Mel Proctor-2015

By:Mel Proctor-2015

I must admit I was very excited about this book.  Gene Mauch has for a long time topped my list of one of the best managers the game has had to offer during its history.  Always one to be saddled with the task of building a winner from the ground up, he never shied from a task like that and rose to the challenge of laying the groundwork for winning teams.

Mel Procter has taken a look at Gene Mauch’s entire career in this book.  From border line Major League player and star in the minors.  You get to see the passion and fire that was a Gene Mauch trademark on the field.  The reader sees what made Mauch tick and the drive that helped propel his small stature and guts into a hard-nosed player who earned the respect of teammates and fans alike.  Being a fan of Mauch this is something that I was not very familiar with.  There is plenty of documentation about his short stays in the Majors, but the Minor League stories were new ones to me, which helped paint a broader picture of his skills and his career.

Seizing the opportunity with the Phillies, the reader then journeys through his managerial career.  It shows the methodical nature that Mauch tried to build winners and the inherent struggles associated with trying to build from within during that era.  Gene’s next stops were Montreal, Minnesota and California, all of which saw varying degrees of improvement under Gene.  You see how his personality of hard-nosed play and determination is transmitted to his players, so maybe winning is contagious after all.  The only down side to the manager portion of the story is that I would have liked to see some more stories about the Twins and Angels.  Those sections weren’t as long as the ones about Philly and Montreal, but when you have a career that spans this many decades you probably have to make some cuts somewhere.

Mel Proctor should be very proud of this book.  He has given complete and honest coverage to a baseball personality that I think gets shafted sometimes.  Just because he came within one pitch of actually making the World Series and was also the captain of the Titanic in Philadelphia in 1964 does not make him a bad manager.  To the contrary I think Mauch was one of the more dedicated and smarter managers in the game during his era and was unfortunately the victim of some bad baseball timing.  There are other managers in the Hall of Fame with multiple World Series trophies that are there partly due to the pinstripes they wore.  I think man for man, Gene Mauch could outshine many of them.

Check out this book for yourself and give Gene Mauch the respect he deserves.  After a life long dedication to the game, he deserves at least that much and honestly baseball fans will enjoy this one.  This may be one of the few chances we as fans get to learn about the real Gene Mauch

You can get this book from the nice folks at Cardinal Publishing

http://www.cardinalpub.com/store/the-little-general-gene-mauch/

Happy Reading

Gregg

The Cy Young Catcher-Crossing Paths with Greatness


As you go through life, even if you don’t want to admit it, luck plays a big part.  As the old saying goes I would rather be lucky than good any day of the week.  For some people timing and opportunity is everything.  It allows them to reach beyond their God-given talents and cross paths with the people who possess incredible talent and skills.  Such is the case with today’s book, proving that timing is everything.

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By:Charlie O’Brien & Doug Wedge-2015

Ask any baseball fan who their personal Hall of Fame members are and I bet you would be hard pressed to find Charlie O’Brien’s name on any of those rosters.  A journeyman catcher that spent 15 years in the Major Leagues that included eight various stops around the league.  Charlie was a part-time player at best appearing in 800 games over those 15 years, that averages out to about 53 games played per year, and a career .221 batting average.  Now these stats are nothing to be ashamed of because Charlie got to play the game we all love for a decade and a half at the highest level.  What makes his story most interesting is the pitchers Charlie was able to work with during his 15 years on the field.  Charlie O’Brien was able to say that he was the catcher to no less than 13 Cy Young Award winners during his career, which is the premise for his new book.

Charlie along with co-author Doug Wedge walk the reader through the his experiences working with these pitchers.  Showing how each pitcher liked to work on the mound and how Charlie would adapt to each of their styles and how he helped to motivate each one in troubled times on the field.  From his start in 1985, to the end of his career, he was able to work with essentially four decades worth of various Cy Young Award winners.  It is a great story of perseverance and even though it may not be a Hall of Fame career, you still can have a pretty cool experience.

Unfortunately there were some down sides to this story.  You get a lot of on field stories but not too much about Charlie himself.  I always like to get the personal side of a player in an autobiography.   Secondly, the entire book is based around the Cy Young premise.  Which is all well and good, but Charlie never played with any of these pitchers when the were winning the award, it was always before or after the fact.  So basically, it is a star crossing with a Cy Young winner, but never at the right time.  That being the fact, it makes the premise of the book a little bit of a stretch, but honestly it is a good tie in to grab readers.

This is in no way a bad book.  It is well written and tells a very entertaining story about what it was like to work with some players that we don’t often find much written about.  Charlie O’Brien should be very proud of his work on the field with these Cy Young pitchers and even though his personal statistics may not reflect the great standards of the game, his own career as well.  Baseball fans should pick this up, if you can get past the lack of continuity with the Cy Young premise, you should really enjoy it.

You can get this book from the nice folks at Texas A&M University Press

http://www.tamupress.com/product/Cy-Young-Catcher,8068.aspx

Happy Reading

Gregg

The Time Has Come – The Bookcase is Moving


I am not sure how many people actually pay attention to my blog, which is fine , I understood that when I started this.  Why would people want to read what I think sometimes, in all honesty these blogs are just my opinions.  Anyway, my posts on here have been few and far between as of late, and maybe for some that may be a good thing that I have been quiet.  The reason behind the silence is that myself, my wife and three fairly ungrateful but still loveable cats are moving.  So the time has come for this.

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We are loading up the bookcase and moving to new digs over the next few days.  So internet access ability will be few and far between and time at a premium, and besides I have a crap-ton of books to pack up and move.  So for the next ten days or so Gregg (that’s me) will be among the missing until we get everything situated at the new place.

For those of you that have stopped by in the past year and checked out the blog, I thank you.  This site is a labor of love for me and nothing more.  So please be patient because in a few days we will be back rolling again.  Also, if anyone has sent me a book to review, please be patient, you will not be forgotten, maybe just delayed a little bit.

I know I am looking for the restoration of some sanity in my life, not living out of cardboard boxes anymore and having some time to start reading again.  So in the mean time, everyone keep reading and if you have any idea for books I should check out, drop me a line and let me know.

Be back soon and Happy Reading

Gregg,

and of course Brina, Phillie, Booger and Moose (All the innocent victims in moving all these books)