Tagged: judge landis

Tales From the Deadball Era-Some of the Wildest Times in Baseball History


Nostalgia is a dangerous thing.  If not used correctly it can skew the memories of people, times and places of bygone eras.  It can make one think and long for something that in hindsight we believe was much better than it really was.  Since Baseball has been around for almost a century and a half, there are many eras that none of use were able to witness first hand.  We rely on history books, the research of many and documentation to see what really happened.  The Deadball era is one that many people have a fondness for and like to learn about it as much as they can.  I recently found a book that allows those Deadball era lovers to get some inside stories of what the game was really like during that time, without succumbing to all that messy nostalgia.

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By: Mark Halfon – 2014

Tales From the Deadball Era allows readers to do some time traveling if you will.  It takes them back to when violence, segregation and gambling were some of the nicer things happening at the baseball games.  A time when fields were in disrepair, equipment was unsophisticated and quite honestly the final product was somewhat of a mess.  It was nothing like the showcase we get to witness on a daily basis today.

Halfon introduces us to some of the major events of the era.  Showing us these highlights along with some of the great personalities ever to play the game, he gives the reader a very complete picture of what was going on during this era.  He also shows some of the more lighthearted moments that infiltrated the game during that period.  Many of these things you would not even dream of as being part of the game today.  The book also shows how necessity is the mother of invention.  Things we normally accept as part of the game had to come from somewhere, and this book shows us those things we should all be thankful for.

If you fancy yourself a novice baseball historian this book is a good book for you.  It gives the reader a nice feel for this time period and will leave you wanting to find out more information about the Deadball era and its personalities.  If you fancy yourself a novice historian on the John Thorn level then you may want to stay away from this one.  If you are at that level you more than likely wont get any new information from this book.  Honestly most fans will enjoy reading this book and spending the time traveling back to these decades long ago.

You can get this book from the nice folks at Potomac Books

Tales From the Deadball Era

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

The Game – Inside the Secret World of Major League Baseball’s Power Brokers


Baseball is in the midst of a Golden Age.  It is hard to deny they are raking on unprecedented money, getting tremendous amounts of exposure and attracting new fans from all around the world.  Now the man at the head of this renaissance of Major League Baseball for over two decades was Bud Selig.  He was heralded as breathing new life into baseball and being the innovator of many things new to the game.  But what was it really like behind the scenes?  The fans and the general public only get the positive spin on situations.  Jon Pessah has written a new book that takes fans behind the scenes and shows us how the process was manipulated.

By: Jon Pessah-2015

By: Jon Pessah-2015

I have always thought there was more to the Bud Selig story than met the eye.  From his ownership of the Milwaukee Brewers, to the power play that he made to become the Commissioner, Avoiding Pete Rose to the legacy he left when retiring.  When he was talking, it always felt like you were not getting the whole story.  His ownership of the Brewers was never something dreams were made of it.  Run on a shoestring budget, they always had roster and financial issues and always were considered the bottom feeders of the league.

Jon Pessah gives the reader a very thorough look at the journey that is Bud Selig.  From used car salesman to his journey to become the king of baseball, you get it all.  You see all the backroom deals and double crosses that made up the reign of Bud. You see his true personality shine through in the business dealings and how no real friendship was actually safe when it involved Selig.  This book puts a real face on the personality of Selig in all of his business dealings, not  just the positive spin that was created for the general public.

The other aspect of this book which I find interesting is Selig’s relationship and dealings with George Steinbrenner, who was basically the only man in the game almost as powerful as Selig.  The book shows a lot of business dealings that the Yankees conducted and how they both meshed and contradicted Major League Baseball’s desires.  It does give a nice glimpse of he internal strife that exists within baseball even to this day.  Overall it was a good example of a team that at times worked against the machine.  The only down side to that approach is that it becomes too Yankees heavy instead of staying on course with the Major League Baseball story, but overall it still works within the book.

Baseball fans should check this one out because it really raises the curtain on the reign of Bud Selig.  He is not the shiny penny everyone always portrayed him as, and it shows what the Commissioner truly was like to deal with.  This book will not in any way tarnish Selig’s legacy but at least now we all know the truth about the man from Milwaukee.

You can get this book from the nice folks at Little, Brown & Co.

The Game

Happy Reading

Gregg