Tagged: jose bautista

The Chalmers Race and the 1910 Batting Title


I have of late, spent a lot of time looking at books that go back over a century in baseball history.  Sometimes the books I have on hand steer the blog more than I ever do.  When you go back this far in history, it is a daunting task to try and answer some question. Record keeping was not even close to the standards that it is today, and the game as a whole created some questionable outcomes.  So I am not really sure how an author would even try and research something from this era and feel confident in the outcomes.  As a baseball community I think we have accepted as accurate what is in the record books but it is still open to some questions no matter who it is.  Rick Huhn has in the past written books from this era and has done an admirable job with the, so with today’s book I am expecting more of the same.

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By Rick Huhn-2014

For those not familiar with this story, auto magnate Hugh Chalmers offered a new Chalmers automobile to the winner of the 1910 batting championship.  By today’s standards a car is no big deal but by 1910 standards, cars were new fangled contraptions that were not commonplace.  So for the players involved this was a big deal.

The long in the short of it is that the race came down between Cleveland’s Nap Lajoie and Detroit’s Ty Cobb.  There was also some controversy about record keeping for both players at the time.  In the end, American League President Ban Johnson made the final decision and awarded the car to Ty Cobb.  Still surrounded in controversy to this day no one is sure who really one, but Cobb got the car.

Rick Huhn does a really good job of relaying to the reader the course of events of 1910. Individual game details, scoring decisions and events all paint a vivid picture for the reader.  He also details the aftermath of Ban Johnson’s decision and court depositions that show the mess that baseball was in during that time period.  It also gives the reader a real good idea of how fixed baseball was during that time period and how it could have been human error, judgement calls or just plains and simple, the fix was in for the car’s winner that caused this giant mess.

The passage of 100 years clouds some of the details, but the author does a nice job throughout the whole book giving the reader what is to believed to be the complete story.  It is something that we prior to this book did not have great clarification on. This book does that job very well and hopefully can lay to rest the true events of the 1910 season.

If you have an interest in this era check this book out.  It is another book that gives a good feel of what really was going on in baseball during this era.  It also is another book that clarifies some of the Ty Cobb myths.  That is not its main intention, but it is a good side effect.  You just need to be a fan of baseball history to enjoy this one,  it slows down a little bit at the mid point in the book, when it gets bogged down in the court proceedings.  But once you are through that it picks back up and completes its mission.

You can get this book from the nice folks at the University of Nebraska Press

The Chalmers Race

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

The Great Baseball Revolt-The Rise and Fall of the 1890 Players League


If you look at baseball history as a whole, it encompasses a large amount of time. Thousands of people and events are all part of the greater story for thousands of reasons. Some of those events get lost to the passage of time, and rightly so.  Just because an event happened does not mean it had any significance to the history of the game itself, it was just the action within the game.  Some events have been suppressed from the history books, for selfish reasons by those involved.  Today’s book takes a look at one of those events and how they helped shape the game as it now known.

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By Robert Ross-2016

Robert Ross has done some heavy lifting with producing this book.  He takes a look at the 1890 Players League that was formed as a rival league to the existing National League.  It offered better salaries and player shares of ownership to play in the league.  This was in contrast to the business dealings of the National league already in existence.  It also allowed the Players League to outdraw the Nationals by the end of the season.  It is a valuable history lesson and shows the power the players have always had and what ownership would like to keep quiet.

This is truly one of the earliest player labor organization movements in the history of the game.  They organized, had some backers and on most fronts were a success.  While their success was for only one year, it shows the powers that the players held and what obstacles they could overcome if they worked together.  In the end it was the fact that National League owners inflated their attendance numbers and cooked their books to the point that it made the Players League look inept.  In the end that was the main downfall of the Players League.

After this failure the Owners held the upper hand for generations and the formation  of the Major League Baseball Players Association almost 75 years later was the first real inroad the players made toward leveling the field with Ownership.  This is where it would have been a benefit to former players to be students of the game.  If they realized they held the power and had banned together sooner, they could have realized better pay and individual rights sooner than they had.  This whole theory could have changed the way free agency came about and would have revolutionized the entire game sooner.

If you have any interest in the labor side of baseball, or rival league history  this book would be a good choice for you.  Yes it happened over a century ago, but it definitely is something that could have changed the direction labor relations took over the past 115 years.  This is one of those history lessons ownership to this day would like to under cover.  Because even today some of these principles could be used to the players benefit.

You can get this book from the nice folks at the University of Nebraska Press

The Great Baseball Revolt

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

The Most Wonderful Week of the Year


Why are we baseball fans?  What draws you to the game?  Is it something tangible or is it a feeling you get from watching it?  Is it the same reason that it was when you were 13, 43 or 63 years old?  Obviously everyone will have a different answer and quite honestly there is no wrong answer.  One thing we all have in common is at one point in our lives, every single one of us wanted to be out on that field as a member of the pros.  That dream faded for many of us when we realized we had not one bit of talent to back it up.  Today’s book takes a look at one of the very few who were lucky enough to keep that little boy’s dream alive inside themselves, and while it may be 40 years behind his schedule it is still a monumental dream fulfilled.

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By Roy Berger-2014

Roy Berger is an average guy just like the rest of us.  Making a home, enjoying his family and friends and raising his kids to the best of his abilities.  But deep down inside he had that dream that to some degree we all still have, he wanted to be a major league baseball player.  While reality sets in for all of us when we realize we don’t have the ability to back up the dream, all of us like Roy never totally let go of that dream.  Being a Pittsburgh Pirates fan in his youth, the 50th anniversary of the 1960 World Series Champions led for a unique opportunity for Roy to make his dreams come true.

Fantasy Camps to me were always a toy for the rich fans.  The ability to hob-nob with the heroes of yesteryear and the chance to be shoulder to shoulder with them out on the battlefield.  Now while I still believe these are the tools of the affluent fan, this book shows us how much dedication one has to put into playing in a fantasy camp along with proving no matter what your financial status is in life, you can’t put a dollar sign on your dreams.

Roy Berger takes us on his journey through four Fantasy Camps.  He starts with his first true love the Pittsburgh Pirates celebrating the 50th anniversary of the 1960 team.  The Pittsburgh Pirates being the first love of his youth was a logical starting point and provided good value for the money.  He shows the reader how any fan might feel going into the first fantasy camp and it gives you a good feel for what these camps are all about.  It also shows how addictive the game of baseball really is to true lifetime fans.

His second year he takes us on tour with the Detroit Tigers.  The combination of rain delays and cancellations at that camp plus the fact that he had no real attachment to the Detroit Tigers led to his worst experience of all the visits.  It was the lowest price of all the camps he attended and proves the adage you get what you pay for.   This trip also showed that even though he was a player in his late 50’s that he still treated the game with respect and went through the needed preparation to give it his best.

His third year, 2012, Roy takes us to his adult adopted team, the New York Yankees fantasy camp.  The highest priced of all the camps, because its the Yankees and they can do it, it offered the most amenities along with the opportunities to hob nob with the most players. An overall great experience both on and off the field, the only downside of course was the price.

Roy’s final fantasy camp took us back to the Pirates, which to me seems to be the best value of all the camps he attended.  A combination of on field injuries and Father Time catching up with Roy made this his poorest performance at any of the camps and lowest showing in the camps final standings for any of the teams he had been on.

This book is a great example of how no matter how old we are, we never can outgrow that little kid inside of each of us that wants to play baseball.  I find it amazing that grown men will pay thousands of dollars for a week of playing baseball with some of their heroes.  It is also the opportunity for grown men and women to create new friendships that endure year to year.  Without doubt this is very a unique opportunity and one that price will ever forbid me from partaking in, and at any age, but if I could afford it I would most certainly go.

Roy’s book does a great job of showing the reader what one goes through in a Fantasy Camp.  It is not just show up and play ball, because at our age (over 40) most of our bodies would just laugh at us if we tried that.  He shows the preparation and dedication required to play  and the most important what it takes to not look like an idiot in front of your heroes.  It shows that no matter how old we get, as long as you can write the check,  baseball will always keep us young at heart.

If you have any sort of inner child this book is great for you.  It will show you where baseball may lead you if you always stay true to both yourself and the game.  You can get this book direct from Roy Berger himself.

The Most Wonderful Week of the Year

Happy Reading

Gregg