Tagged: hall of fame voting

My 30 Ballpark Summer


Well, the holidays are officially over.  The decorations are away and we are all well on our way to breaking our new years resolutions.  It is currently 4 degrees outside of my house and I am patiently awaiting spring training. During this time my wife and I wonder where would we like to go on any trips this year and if we are going to make it to any Phillies games.  The latter part of that planning, the Phillies games, leads me to wonder if we could plan a couple trips and see some other stadiums as well.  Usually I get overruled on the other cities but we at least make it to the Phils. Today’s book is about one man’s journey and his trek to visit all 30 of the MLB stadiums.

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By:Tobey Shiverick-2016

I will be honest, a trip like this is my ultimate dream.  Checking out each stadium and every team that calls each one home.  This will be my retirement plan, just no one can tell my wife yet.  So for now, I have to live vicariously through Tobey Shiverick.

Shiverick brings us along his 18 flight, five month, 34,000 mile baseball journey.  He walks us through his experience at each stadium and gives us the highs or lows that he feels each has to offer.  He gives the reader the general vibe of the stadium and that of the teams fans.  I can only attest to Philadelphia, but he did have a pretty good read on Citizens Bank Park after only one game.

For a true baseball fan this would be the ultimate experience.  For fans from the same generation as the author, you also get the added bonus of being able to compare the stadiums of yesteryear to the modern palaces of today.  From Ebbets Field, to Dodger Stadium, The Polo Grounds to the palace in San Fran and of course, Yankee Stadium vs. that new one they built across the street.

Even fans of my generation would be able to do the some comparison to a lesser degree.  We would be able to do Shea Stadium to Citi Field,  Veterans Stadium to Citizens Bank Park and Three Rivers to PNC Park.  None of those generate heart palpitations in the spectrum of great stadiums, but does help foster some nostalgia nonetheless.

This book may be geared more to the older crowd versus the younger fan, mostly because the older generations would be able to afford this type of journey.  The expense has to be enormous between stops in 30 cities, hotel rooms, travels and meals.   The average fan would have a hard time being able to pony up the cash to pull this one off.  Also the print in this book is a little bigger than a lot of books I come across, so I am assuming they are expecting an older crowd reading the book.  Quite honestly, I read so many books that I appreciated the larger print for a change.

Fans should check this out.  Even if you are not able to do a 30 park tour, this book would be able to help you pick even one new park to check out.  It has endless value for fans in getting a feel for those parks they have never been to.

You can get this book from the nice folks at Summer Game Books

My 30 Ballpark Summer

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

 

 

 

Still Throwing Heat-Strikeouts, the Streets and a Second Chance


When you think of the Houston Astros in the 1970’s, one of the first names that comes to mind is J.R.Richard.  Being a tall and lanky pitcher with a blazing fastball, he combined both of these attributes to scare the crap out of hitters throughout the National League.  In an era in Houston before Nolan Ryan, Richard was the ace on the staff of the young up and coming group.  With the signing of Nolan Ryan the Astros became a force to be reckoned within the league and the sky was the limit for everyone. Then one day the glass ceiling shattered and for one player life would never be the same.

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By: J.R. Richard & Lew Freedman-2015

I was really looking forward to this one.  I was always a fan of J.R.’s growing up and remember him in the Astros uniforms of the late 70’s.  I remember hearing of his stroke and trying to follow his comeback as best a fan who lived in Philadelphia in 1980 could.  The translation of that last sentence means I could not follow it very well.  So between the story line and Lew Freedman working on this book I expected a winner.  I am happy to say I was not disappointed.

The book follows a back and forth format.  Each chapter starts with an overview of what that chapter is going to cover, presumably in the words of Freeman.  Then it shifts to Richard sharing his story.  It is a good format that works very well for this book, instead of trying to make it all seem like J.R. doing all of the storytelling.

The book covers a great deal of topics in Richard’s life.  It talks about his poor upbringing, his trek through the minors and then finally arriving in Houston to stay.  The biggest part of this book is of course, talking about his unfortunate stroke and the devastating after effects it has had on his entire life.  He shows you how his career was never able to be revived, how marriages failed, business dealings went bad and all the things that eventually led to him living on the streets of Houston.

One would think after all of this J.R. Richard would be extremely bitter, but I found just the opposite in this story.  He has been lucky enough to find God and get his life back on track.  He has through his faith been able to understand his past, and accept it for who it has helped him become.  It really is a remarkable story of perseverance and overcoming obstacles in one’s life.  He shows great character and is a better man than I ever could because of his outlook of his own life.  If it was me that had to struggle through all of this, I don’t ever think I could have kept the positive outlook he was able to maintain.

There has not been a lot of things published on J.R. in the past, so this book really helps fans understand what truly went on in J.R. Richard’s life. All baseball fans should check this out it really is both an enjoyable and remarkable story.

You can get this book from the nice folks at Triumph Books

Still Throwing Heat

Happy Reading and Merry Christmas to all, may Santa be nice to your library this year.

Gregg