Tagged: Glenn Burke

Kings of Queens-Life Beyond Baseball With the ’86 Mets


Some teams leave an indelible mark on the history of baseball.  Everyone likes remembering the greats such as the 60 Pittsburgh Pirates, 76 New York Yankees, 69 New York Mets, 68 Detroit Tigers and my personal favorite, the 80 Philadelphia Phillies, are just a few of the teams that make the grade.  Even beyond these there a few teams that stand higher above all the rest as the most memorable teams.  The 1986 New York Mets are in a class all by themselves.  A team of rough and ragged players that worked their way into the hearts of New Yorkers, and turned the baseball establishment on its ear for one glorious season.  Erik Sherman has written a new book that takes a look at some of the key players from that team and where their lives have gone both in and out of baseball.

61gSG7OeBFL._SX327_BO1,204,203,200_

By Erik Sherman-2016

Being that 2016 is the 30th anniversary of their championship season, and the fact that the Mets surprisingly made it to the World Series last year I expected a large selection of Mets themed books this year.  The ones I have found so far all have varying themes.  The 1986 season as a whole is looked at by some, reliving Bill Buckner’s nightmare is approached by others, but this is the first one I have come across that looks at the individual players.

Erik Sherman dedicates a chapter to each of several key players he has interviewed from the 1986 New York Mets.   They discuss their contributions to the team and the instances of how they came about becoming a member of the Mets.  Sherman does in depth interviews with each of the players and you get a nice feel of what they think were the most important qualities of that team.  The players all make clear that they were proud to be a part of that team and some even show some disappointment that the Mets have not reached out after their playing days and done a better job of preserving team heritage.

One of the most important things I found in these interviews was that none of the players that had issues, on or off the field during this era, shied away from their indiscretions.  Everyone manned up and admitted their faults.  Perhaps that is just a product of growing older, but it was still refreshing to see former professional athletes admit to their mistakes.

You may not be a Mets fan but you have to give this team their due, honestly they were an interesting team to watch.  The circumstances that surrounded the team at times and the way they won the World Series are a better script then Hollywood would have been able to produce.  So put your team affiliation away and check this book out.  Erik Sherman does a great job with his book.  He asks honest and clear questions in his interviews and doesn’t pull any punches with the guys.  I have enjoyed Erik Sherman’s other work and have reviewed his books about Mookie Wilson,  Steve Blass and Glenn Burke in the past with positive results from all.

Take this walk down memory lane with the New York Mets of the past.  You will find it is time well spent and probably like I did, find it hard to believe this was 30 years ago.

You can get this book from the nice folks at Berkely Books

Kings of Queens

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

Out at Home – The Glenn Burke Story


Baseball books can provide valuable history lessons.  Even if they are of the biography genre, they can still give valuable lessons to the reader about a multitude of things.  It has always been said that baseball mimics society and in the case of todays book that may ring true.  It shows how society has changed and become more tolerant and accepting.  Baseball may be slow to change at times but in this case, they have finally caught up with society.

51biTsBXt8L__SY344_BO1,204,203,200_

Berekely Re-Issue Edition-2015

Glenn Burke was the first openly gay athlete in Major League Baseball.  While that alone is trailblazing, in the end he suffered the wrath of the game and became black-balled.  He had a very short career in the majors playing for both the Los Angeles Dodgers and Oakland A’s in the late 70’s.  For his brief career he put up decent numbers and probably had he not been openly gay would have had a longer career.  When you are the first person who does anything different in baseball it seems that you have a much more difficult time being accepted than the next person.  Just ask Jackie Robinson, being a trend setter is hard work.

Glenn Burke suffered the wrath of the baseball hierarchy and essentially lost his career for it.  Even though some of his teammates knew about his sexual orientation and didn’t care, the baseball establishment was not embracing it.  Glenn eventually died of AIDS in 1995 and this book was his way of getting his story out before his untimely death.  It is a very good book that shows the struggles and humiliation Glenn had to endure just to be himself and play the game he loved.  It shows some of the intolerant practices that existed during his time in the jock world of Major League Baseball.

More importantly this book allows the reader to see how both the game and society has evolved in the twenty years since its initial publication.  MLB has now added the Ambassador of Inclusion position in Billy Bean so that these issues don’t happen again.  This book also shows how society’s views have evolved in regards to homosexuality and it is not as big of an issue as it once was.  It shows that everyone has a place within our society and while it may not happen as fast as some people would like it has made some progress.  One thing I found interesting between the original publication of this book and the re-issued edition is that they used the same cover photo, but the Dodgers logos had been removed his uniform.  It just struck me as odd that after all this time they would remove them.

Glenn Burke is pretty much at this point a footnote in baseball history but this book does give you a nice glimpse of both the player and the man.  Perhaps if he was somewhere else on a less profile team than the Dodgers, his career may have lasted longer but honestly who knows.  After all he went through you get no signs of bitterness from Glenn for his outcome in life.  He was proud of who he was and who he loved, and hoped in the end he would be remembered as a good person and what more can any of us ask for in life.

You can get this book from the nice folks at Berkeley Publishing Group

http://www.penguin.com/book/out-at-home-by-glenn-burke-erik-sherman/9780425281437

Happy Reading

Gregg