Tagged: General managers

In Pursuit of Pennants-Baseball Operations from Deadball to Moneyball


Its that time of year where baseball’s winter meetings are upon us.  The one week a year where the business side of baseball comes to the forefront.  Players are traded, free agents get signed and the Rule 5 draft occurs.  For some fans it is an early Christmas present when your team signs that key free agent, while for others it might be the time you say goodbye to one of your favorite players.  For the people that work these meetings it is just another day of business as usual.  Fans sometimes get so engrossed in their team they may forget at the end of the day that baseball is still a business.  For the people who are involved it is their job.  A job many of us envy, but still a job nonetheless.  Now there is a book that walks us through the business side of baseball and shows how the more things change, they somehow stay the same.

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By: Armour & Levitt-2015

In Pursuit of Pennants takes an in depth look at the business of baseball, almost a history of the business side of you will.  It looks at franchises over the last 100 years, showing the reader the dealings and hard business decisions that had to be made to produce winners.  The book looks at how the teams were assembled and what worked and did not work.  What key moves were made to help teams lay the groundwork for success, what moves should have been made to sustain the success or which moves proved to be just plain foolish.

The book also shows how teams heavily rely on their off-field personnel to help them build winners.  The chain of command goes well beyond just the General Managers.  All aspects of the front office play a part in the success of the team.  It shows how everyone must believe in the team philosophy to be able to have it work at any level.  It also shows that the same principles employed in the Moneyball theory have always been around.  It may not have been the same ways to measure productivity or forecast any outcomes, but there were still theories that they adhered to that evolved as the game changed.  The bottom line for all teams is to produce a winner.

Like other Armour and Levitt books, this book may not be for everyone.  It is part history book, part reference book and part narrative.  If you are looking for a nice easy flowing story that rolls through the book, this is not it.  If you are looking for detailed information on the business side of baseball and a very thorough history lesson then this is your book.  The authors have done a great job of explaining a not so glorious subject to the readers.  The topic to some may be the equivalent of watching paint dry, but for those who stick with the book, you will be greatly rewarded in the end.   You will walk away with a better understanding of how teams function off the field and understand the mindset needed to build a winner.

Baseball fans across the board that dedicate the time to reading this book will enjoy it.  It honestly does start of a little slow but does pick up the pace enough to keep your interest through the rest of the book, so overall you wont be disappointed.

You can get this book from the nice folks at the University of Nebraska Press

In Pursuit of Pennants

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

The Wizard of Waxahachie, Paul Richards and the End of Baseball as we knew it


Baseball is full of storied careers.  With the passage of time, some of the stories become bigger than life.  Some of those careers get clouded by the haze of nostalgia, or the feeling of what we used to have is better than today.  Todays book takes an honest look at a high-profile career and gave me a clear look at what really happened.

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The Wizard of Waxahachie

By:Warren Corbett – 2009 Southern Methodist University Press

Paul Richards mark on baseball is undeniable.  There are many things, by design or perhaps by accident, that have been attributed to him.  Pitch counts, five man pitching rotations, tracking on-base percentages, his fingerprints are all over baseball today.  What you don’t always see is the way the mind operated during his lifetime dedicated to the sport.

Warren Corbett wrote a book almost 25 years after Richards death.  Relying on family memories, notes and audio recordings that the family had provided, and has given a seldom seen side of Paul Richards.  He delves in to the devious side of Richards and his dealings with players and management during his illustrious career.  He also creates an accurate feeling that he was a hustler to many, both on the field and the golf course.

The most interesting aspect of this book to me is the trouble Paul Richards had bridging the generation gap.  When I say generation gap I am talking about the gap that was created near the end of his career in the dawn of free agency.  Richards had a lot of problems accepting the birth and subsequent power of the MLB Players Union.  It shows how after almost 50 years in baseball he was very set in his ways.

While after finding moderate success on and off the field in all his stops in baseball, Richards was a man of many friends and able to work the old boy network to his advantage and always find work.  That may be some of the reason he was not interested in adjusting to the new era of baseball.  The book is very heavy in detail about his time in Baltimore with the Orioles.  It was the longest stop of his career but still dominates about half of this book.  His stops in Houston, Atlanta, both stops in Chicago and finally Texas seem to be condensed versions to fit in the book.  I think a little more time could have been spent in Houston alone, due to the challenges of building a new franchise.

In the end Richards does not come out of the book looking like the genius he is regarded as today.  He seems almost human and to an extent skating through some of the stops in his career.  The end result of the book has shown us what I feel is a very fair and accurate portrait of Paul Richards.  Wayne Corbett did a great job on this biography especially since he was doing it almost 25 years after Richards death.

You can get this book from the nice folks at Southern Methodist University Press

http://www.tamupress.com

Happy Reading

Gregg