Tagged: fred hutchinson

Fred Hutchinson and the 1964 Cincinnati Reds


Throughout baseball history there are some amazing stories.  Stories that if you tried to have someone from Hollywood write it, the general public would never believe it was true.  The down side to these stories is unless the are juicy and so far out of this world against the odds, they sometimes get lost to the annals of baseball history.  One such story is the one involving Fred Hutchinson and the Reds of 1964.  When one talks about 1964 the big story out of the National League is the collapse of the Philadelphia Phillies and how the St. Louis Cardinals when the dust settled were the National League champions.  The third sister at the dance that year was the Cincinnati Reds and as the last day unfolded they were right there trying to win the pennant as well.  In the end the Reds came up short but the fascinating underlying story of that team was that their manager was fighting terminal cancer the entire season.  Hutchinson’s work for most of the year along with fill-in skipper Dick Sisler, got the Reds within one step of the World Series.  While today’s book is not a new release, in my opinion it is an often overlooked story in baseball history that from time to time needs to be brought back to the forefront.

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By: Doug Wilson-2010

Doug Wilson for me is one of those writers that could write a phone book in such a way that I would find it interesting.  His other works that I have been exposed to Brooks about Brooks Robinson and The Bird about Mark Fidrych are both top notch biographies and were reviewed on this site in previous posts.  This book predates both of the other two books I mentioned above but I expected nothing but the same quality book from Wilson on this one.  I am glad to report that I was not disappointed.

Doug Wilson starts out the book by giving a nice background on Fred Hutchinson.  His personal background, his playing career, time spent managing in Seattle, Detroit and St. Louis showing how his baseball personality was shaped along the way.  The book also shows us how the first few years Hutchinson spent shaping the Reds into contenders including an unexpected trip to the 1961 World Series.  It also shows how he handled up and coming superstars such as Pete Rose and how he helped mold them into winners as well.

Obviously the biggest part of the book is spent discussing the 1964 season and how right before it Hutchinson was diagnosed with his terminal cancer.  In December 1963 Hutchinson was diagnosed with his illness and from the start the prognosis was not good.  1964 from the start for the Cincinnati Reds was dedicated to the fight for the life of Fred Hutchinson and both he and his Reds fought a valiant fight from day one of the season.  Unfortunately Fred Hutchinson’s health did not allow him to make it through the season and he was replaced by Dick Sisler.  The Cinicnnati Reds fell a bit short on winning the N.L. Pennant for Hutch and subsequently he passed away a few weeks later.

It is a very compelling story from beginning to end and if it happened in todays world the outcome for Fred Hutchinson may have been very different as well as the media coverage given to his story.  Disney would have grabbed on to it and made a movie out of it, Major League Baseball would have had an official business partner for it and we would have been inundated with lots of things regarding Hutch’s situation from Joe Buck each week on the national telecast.  It is a perfect example as to how the business aspect of the game has changed and how they can and will use anything they find marketable.

Getting back to the book, Doug Wilson did a great job of sharing the story of Fred Hutchinson.  It is a story that will eventually get lost to the annals of time, but nonetheless should be remembered.  If this story was based in New York or Los Angeles I think the media play on it would have been much more, but Cincinnati was propbably just not flashy enough for the powers that be.  Wilson gave the reader a real good look at the subject and while being a sad subject , turns it into an enjoyable experience for the reader.  I would obviously recommend it to Reds fans, but all readers should check it out for the valuable history lesson contained within.

You can get this book from the nice folks at McFarland

Fred Hutchinson and the 1964 Cincinnati Reds

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

Pudge-The Autobiography of Carlton Fisk


There are certain moments in baseball history that transcend time.  The team, the year and the location are of little consequence, but that moment stays fresh in everyone’s mind forever.  For me, one of those moments is Carlton Fisk’s home run in Fenway Park during Game Six of the 1975 World Series.  It is one of the most iconic moments in the history of the game, and possibly the one thing Carlton Fisk is most famous for.  What else do we really know about Fisk though?  Everyone is familiar with his playing career and the numbers he put up during his Hall of Fame career, but how much do we really know about his personality?  Recently a book has been published that gives an inside look at the Hall of Fame slugger.

By: Doug Wilson-2015

By: Doug Wilson-2015

To me for some reason, Carlton Fisk is one of those Hall of Famers that hides in the shadows.  When you think of the Hall of Fame he is not the first person that comes to mind.  Perhaps it is because his lone World Series was in 1975, or maybe its his calm and steady demeanor that relegates him to the background.  Whatever the reason may be, he is truly worthy of his place in Cooperstown and Doug Wilson has done a really nice job of walking the reader behind the curtain that is Carlton Fisk.

A man of great integrity that came from a strong New England upbringing, Fisk is portrayed as a pillar of character and personal strength.  The author takes readers on a journey through Fisk’s growing up and forging the character that is a staple of his personality.  You also get to see his debut in the majors and how he came to be a respected catcher and dedicated teammate.  Obviously this book would not even be close to complete without getting the inside story on the World Series Home Run.  It does a very nice job of showing the true story of Fisk’s time in Boston.  It shows the behind the scenes struggles with team management that ultimately led to the home-grown slugger heading to Chicago.

His time in Chicago and life after baseball for Fisk is also covered very nicely here.  It does show a complete picture of Fisk’s career.  It also lends a personal side to the Catcher that is not something I have come across before.  It was nice to see a book that focused on the person, instead of just the Home Run in 1975.

Doug Wilson always does a nice job with his books.  They are not overly flashy, but are always well researched and the subjects are usually ones that are lacking in other coverage.  His three other books that are out there do a nice job as well of covering their subject matter.  In my opinion Doug Wilson is becoming one of the better baseball biographers of this era.

All baseball fans should check this one out.  We are all familiar with the player and now its time to get to know the man behind the Catcher’s mask.

You can get this book from the nice folks at Thomas Dunne Books

Pudge-The Biography of Carlton Fisk

Happy Reading

Gregg