Tagged: drug suspension

Team Chemistry-The History of Drugs and Alcohol in Baseball


Drugs has a nasty ring to it, no matter what your line of work.  I am sure some occupations have a higher recreational drug use than others.  Reasons could be stress or the dangers of the job, but it is still recreational drug use.  What about the times that the drug use is because it gives you an edge over your co-workers.  Essentially, that is what drug use is for in the professional sports leagues.  To give you that edge over your teammates, to get you to the next big contract and reach that big pay day.  The last 35 years or so there has been some well documented heavy duty drug use in baseball.  So much so, that drug trials have almost been the norm every so often.  Prior to the last 35 years Major League Baseball did a much better job of keeping the genie in the bottle.  Now there is a book that takes a look at baseball’s drug abuse problem beyond the steroid’s scandals.

9780252081330

By Nathan Michael Corzine-2016

If you look at all the usual items that baseball players have used since the beginning of time, there are certain things that you could categorize as drugs just due to the fact that they have addictive qualities to them.  Alcohol and tobacco have been around since the beginning of baseball.  Now if you add in greenie pills, you get another drug that was a baseball staple long before cocaine and other performance enhancing drugs.

What Nathan Corzine tries to do with this book is show the full history of drugs within the game.  The way he goes about it is very eye opening at least for me, because he is able to prove the progression of stimulants and illegal drugs throughout the game.  It goes to show that the powers that be within baseball ownership did a very good job of hiding the truth.  In all reality how many times have you looked at Mickey Mantle’s drinking problem and thought that is part of the bigger problem?  This book takes those types of things to task and shows we have had the same types of problems all along, they were just hiding in different disguises.

Corzine’s book really makes you stop and think about baseball history.  It takes issues with more than just Roger Clemens in a locker room bathroom or even Balco.  These are just recent faces to the problems that have been hiding in the shadows of baseball for much longer than any of us have realized.

If you have any interest in the drug scandals of the last four decades, check this book out. You may be surprised to see that these issues have been lurking in the shadows much longer than any of us wanted to realize or admit to.  Reader’s may not buy in 100% of all the things that would be considered drugs in this book, but it will definitely make you re-think what your definition truly is.

You can get this book from the nice folks at the University of Illinois Press

Team Chemistry-The History of Drugs and Alcohol in MLB

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

 

 

Fred Hutchinson and the 1964 Cincinnati Reds


Throughout baseball history there are some amazing stories.  Stories that if you tried to have someone from Hollywood write it, the general public would never believe it was true.  The down side to these stories is unless the are juicy and so far out of this world against the odds, they sometimes get lost to the annals of baseball history.  One such story is the one involving Fred Hutchinson and the Reds of 1964.  When one talks about 1964 the big story out of the National League is the collapse of the Philadelphia Phillies and how the St. Louis Cardinals when the dust settled were the National League champions.  The third sister at the dance that year was the Cincinnati Reds and as the last day unfolded they were right there trying to win the pennant as well.  In the end the Reds came up short but the fascinating underlying story of that team was that their manager was fighting terminal cancer the entire season.  Hutchinson’s work for most of the year along with fill-in skipper Dick Sisler, got the Reds within one step of the World Series.  While today’s book is not a new release, in my opinion it is an often overlooked story in baseball history that from time to time needs to be brought back to the forefront.

51uu0LE+jLL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_

By: Doug Wilson-2010

Doug Wilson for me is one of those writers that could write a phone book in such a way that I would find it interesting.  His other works that I have been exposed to Brooks about Brooks Robinson and The Bird about Mark Fidrych are both top notch biographies and were reviewed on this site in previous posts.  This book predates both of the other two books I mentioned above but I expected nothing but the same quality book from Wilson on this one.  I am glad to report that I was not disappointed.

Doug Wilson starts out the book by giving a nice background on Fred Hutchinson.  His personal background, his playing career, time spent managing in Seattle, Detroit and St. Louis showing how his baseball personality was shaped along the way.  The book also shows us how the first few years Hutchinson spent shaping the Reds into contenders including an unexpected trip to the 1961 World Series.  It also shows how he handled up and coming superstars such as Pete Rose and how he helped mold them into winners as well.

Obviously the biggest part of the book is spent discussing the 1964 season and how right before it Hutchinson was diagnosed with his terminal cancer.  In December 1963 Hutchinson was diagnosed with his illness and from the start the prognosis was not good.  1964 from the start for the Cincinnati Reds was dedicated to the fight for the life of Fred Hutchinson and both he and his Reds fought a valiant fight from day one of the season.  Unfortunately Fred Hutchinson’s health did not allow him to make it through the season and he was replaced by Dick Sisler.  The Cinicnnati Reds fell a bit short on winning the N.L. Pennant for Hutch and subsequently he passed away a few weeks later.

It is a very compelling story from beginning to end and if it happened in todays world the outcome for Fred Hutchinson may have been very different as well as the media coverage given to his story.  Disney would have grabbed on to it and made a movie out of it, Major League Baseball would have had an official business partner for it and we would have been inundated with lots of things regarding Hutch’s situation from Joe Buck each week on the national telecast.  It is a perfect example as to how the business aspect of the game has changed and how they can and will use anything they find marketable.

Getting back to the book, Doug Wilson did a great job of sharing the story of Fred Hutchinson.  It is a story that will eventually get lost to the annals of time, but nonetheless should be remembered.  If this story was based in New York or Los Angeles I think the media play on it would have been much more, but Cincinnati was propbably just not flashy enough for the powers that be.  Wilson gave the reader a real good look at the subject and while being a sad subject , turns it into an enjoyable experience for the reader.  I would obviously recommend it to Reds fans, but all readers should check it out for the valuable history lesson contained within.

You can get this book from the nice folks at McFarland

Fred Hutchinson and the 1964 Cincinnati Reds

Happy Reading

Gregg