Tagged: Dick Williams

Hairs vs. Squares…and the Tumultuous Summer of ’72


There are certain seasons that stand out from others.  Perhaps it is a historical event that happened during that particular year, a team that overcame great odds or even a year of monumental changes that may be hard to recognize without the use of hind sight.  1972 is one of those years that on the surface while it was happening, the participants really were not living it going this is something great we are doing here.  It was a year that was plop in the middle of the time when the players union was starting to be a formidable force within the game, as well as a noticeable change in society’s values.  Time where authority was being challenged, inflation was starting to run rampant and in the public’s eyes baseball would start moving from just a game to a business.  Today’s book takes a look at the one pivotal year within this decade of change and shows some of the signs that people may have missed that the game was changing.

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By:Ed Gruver-2016

1972 offered some interesting things to baseball fans.  Rosters were jammed full of future Hall of Famers, some at the beginnings of their careers and sadly other at the end, but when the bell would ring, still able to bring it.  It was the first year the Player Union made enough noise to institute a strike and cost MLB owners some games, showing that Marvin Miller was not going to go away quietly as they had hoped.  Salaries were on the move up and players were going from needing to have extra income in the off-season(second job) to living comfortably all year on their baseball earnings.  On the field the most amazing thing happened was that the Oakland A’s run by the miserly Charlie Finley won the first of their three straight World Series titles.  But at the time nobody realized what they were about to witness.  Facing the straight laced Cincinnati Reds led by Pete Rose they knocked off their first title and showed the baseball world that the guys with their long hair and mustaches had finally arrived.

Ed Gruver’s new book takes the reader through the changing times in baseball during the 1972 season.  Looking back on that year from our comfy couches in 2016, the big headlines that year was the 1972 World Series between the A’s and the Reds.  Essentially a clash between old school baseball and new world values.  On the field it was all old school baseball but off the field the Oakland A’s were a sight glass into the changing norms of society.  Clothing, attitude and rules were all up for debate as far as the rowdy A’s were concerned.

The author also does a great job at covering at the different teams that made a splash during the 1972 season.   The Detroit Tigers, Pittsburgh Pirates and St Louis Cardinals all had seasons to remember on the field and some individuals made headlines as well.  Willie Mays made triumphant return to the New York by joining the Mets,  Hank Aaron  was making headlines almost every day in his chase of Babe Ruth’s career home run mark and Dick Allen was singlehandedly saving the Chicago White Sox franchise on the way to winning the American League MVP trophy.  It gives the reader a good look of what was going on around baseball beyond just the World Series participants.  It shows the up and downs of other teams that before the decade was out would create their own histories.

This book gives you a great feel of what being part of 1972 was all about and how to some degree it was the changing of the guard within baseball.  Old school baseball thinking versus new school societal ways created some tumultuous times and 1972 was the tipping point.   I always enjoy these books that pick a single year and dissect all the important events.  We have seen this type of book in Dan Epstein’s book about the 1976 season, Stars & Strikes and TimWendel’s Summer of ’68.  Those books like this one, segregate that one season and look at the effects that it may have had on other seasons down the line.  These are great tools for fans who were not able to be there the first time around, but want to know the ins and outs of that season and what made it so special.

This book is published by the University of Nebraska press and the last book I recently did by them was in my opinion not up to their normal editing standards from a factual standpoint.  I am glad to say this book has raised the bar back up to their normal standards for the most part, but did have one easily verifiable mistake that drove me crazy, and as a Phillies fan it made me even crazier.  The book states that Dick Allen was the first black player ever on the Phillies when he debuted in 1963. That would be three years after the last team integrated in Major League Baseball.  For the Phillies the first player of color was John Kennedy in 1957.  Other than that there was nothing substantial in the error department.

If you are a fan of this era you should enjoy it.  It does start out a little slow and does offer a bit too much game play by play in spots but the product as a whole reads well.  You get a new appreciation for 1972, because this year is an integral part of a larger era and sometimes gets overlooked when examined as part of the greater time frame.

You can get this book from the nice folks at the University of Nebraska Press

Hairs vs. Squares

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

 

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Finley Ball-How Two Outsiders Changed the Game Forever


Some members of off field personnel throughout the history of the game have left an indelible mark.  Whether it was their contributions to the game, their foresight or just their personality, they are hard people to forget.  These same people receive one of two legacies from the game of baseball.  They get the type of treatment after they die that they gave to Bill Veeck.  They really didn’t approve of his efforts while a member of the baseball establishment, but after he died he became an innovator.  The baseball establishment also had another whipping boy during this same era.  A man who was years ahead of his time and whose ideas and strategies would leave a lasting impression on the game.  During his time as a member of the owners club, he was ridiculed and mocked by his peers and honestly the passage of time and his death have not done much to change his legacy.  The name Charlie Finley is one that almost all baseball fans are familiar with, and one that several books have been written about.  Now, there is a book that gives the reader an inside look at the genius that was Charlie, along with the help of his right hand man Carl, and how together they built the dynasty that was the Oakland A’s.

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By: Nancy Finley-2016

Nancy Finley gives the reader a unique perspective of the Finley operations.  She is the daughter of Carl and the niece of Charlie who essentially grew up around the A’s during the dynasty years.  She gives the reader a nice background on how Charlie obtained the team along with a great history of the team during the Kansas City years.  She shows how Finley was willing to invest in his team and stadium, out of his own pocket, and was always willing to put on a show for his fans.  Without being a spoiler, he really wanted to give back to the fans and promote his product and his innovations really left a lasting impression on the game of baseball.

Next up Nancy shows you how the move to Oakland really came to fruition.  That move and Charlie’s willingness to build a winner from within, finally allowed the team to win a few world championships and become a full fledged dynasty.  Finally you see the change in baseball that was the ultimate demise of the Finley empire in Oakland and what forced him to reluctantly sell the team.

What I find the most interesting aspect of the book is the inside details the author is able to give the reader.  She is able to give great details on the day to day operations with shoe string staffs and how her dad Carl, was the number one trusted employee of Charles Finley.  Through their combined efforts they were able to build a baseball empire the like of which may never be seen again in the history of baseball.

This book gives us a great inside look of both the baseball operations and the people involved with the A’s during this era.  It also to me, gives a more personal portrait of Charlie Finley that we have never seen before.  It portrays him in a much kinder light than others I have ever seen before, and I think that portrayal is much more credible since it is from someone with first hand knowledge of the family.

This book is a fun trip through the Finley era.  I recommend if you have any interest in this era of baseball, to give this one a look.  It sheds some new, inside information on the Finley dynasty and how two outsiders really changed the game, and also what really became of Charlie O., the A’s beloved mascot.

You can get this book from the nice folks at Regnery History

Finley Ball

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

 

Long Taters-A Biography of George Scott


It’s funny how a baseball book can scratch the surface but never quite get all the way through.  With biographies that seems to be especially true.  For reasons unknown, perhaps shame, emotional reasons, or whatever some guys just never will give up the whole story.  As writers and interviewees they have every right to do so, but in the end, it always leaves questions in the reader’s mind.  Baseball players play an intricate part in the fans life. You spend 8 plus months following a player each year.  Stats, stories, news and dramatic plays all find their way into our daily lives.  So its only natural to want to know as much about your favorite players as possible.  Unfortunately even after they publish a book you may not get all your answers.  For me today’s book left me with some unanswered questions.

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By:Ron Anderson-McFarland 2012

I have always felt the George Scott was underrated. Possibly because of some of the teams he played on and being overshadowed by his own teammates. Maybe it was the fact he had the same type of relationship with the media that Dick Allen had, and that effected his popularity.  Regardless of the reason I never felt Boomer got his due.   Due to that fact, you never really felt you knew or understood George Scott as well as some of the other players on the team.  Ron Anderson has finally given the world a book that helps people understand and appreciate George Scott.  The author did some serious homework with this book.  Compiling interviews with Scott himself and countless friends, family and even some enemies, he has been able to portray a side of the man we never saw on the field.

From Scott’s beyond poor upbringing in segregated and violent Mississippi, his struggles to reach the major leagues and make it with the Boston Red Sox, you see a portrait of what made the man.  Events that helped guide his life and molded his personality.  You see daily struggles that he had to over come just because of the color of his skin and how those struggles effected him all of his days.  You also see confrontations that were a result of all of these issues.

When you think of great sluggers, George Scott does not jump into a lot of people’s minds.  He did have a very solid 14 year career and put up some pretty healthy numbers.  This book does give some insight into the man, his career and events that unfolded before and during baseball that both helped and hurt him.  The only part I would have liked to see is more about his life after baseball, off-seasons and more on a personal level.  It did not lack in giving George the credit he deserved in any way.  He finally got his due, it just felt like some part of the complete story of Boomer’s life may have been omitted.  Perhaps by accident or by design,  but in the end I still felt a little void.

Baseball fans of all teams will enjoy this one.  You get a chance to relive a career that most times gets forgotten.

You can get this book from the nice folks at McFarland Publishing

http://www.mcfarlandpub.com

Happy Reading

Gregg