Tagged: christy mathewson

In Ty Cobb’s Shadow


I find it fascinating that within the history of baseball there are still forgotten Superstars.  We have left no stone unturned in the documentation of the game, yet there are still players that do not get the respect or recognition they deserve.  Napoleon Lajoie is one of those players that falls into this group.  Yes he has gotten his plaque in Cooperstown and no one can take away his monster career numbers, but to me he always seems like an afterthought.  Perhaps timing comes into play here, being a part of the same generation as some of the games premier immortals, forcing him out of the spotlight.  Today’s book acknowledges his undeserved existence living in the shadows of the game’s bigger stars.

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By Greg Rubano-2016

In all honesty, I know of Napoleon Lajoie and his great contributions to the game, but I am not very well read on him.  I thought that was somewhat odd for a Hall of Famer, but after a little research I now know that there are not that many Lajoie bios’s on the market.  So I was hoping with this book to learn a little bit more in depth about both the man and the player.  I got some of what I wanted, but not all of it.

This book is not a beginning to end Napoleon Lajoie biography as it is billed.  It is a series of anecdotes, poems, photos and other assorted bits that give the reader a very good feel for what baseball was like during this period.  Now it also dedicated a good portion of the book to Napoleon Lajoie and his storied career as one would expect.  How he was loved by his fans and how he lived his years after baseball.  The final chapter of this book shares a conversation between Ty Cobb and Napoleon Lajoie on a warm Florida afternoon a few years before their respective deaths, which I found very interesting.  It gave a brief glimpse of the immense pride of these two greats of the game.

The down side of this book for me was that this book was not a full Lajoie biography.  It was an opportunity missed for new generations to learn in depth about an oft forgotten Hall of Fame career.  My other pet peeve with this book was misspelled words and overall poor editing.  Just a pet peeve that arises from time to time for me as an avid reader.

So in the end something is better than nothing at all.  It didn’t give me enough of the Lajoie information that I was hoping for, but fans of this period should still enjoy it. Hopefully Lajoie is not one of those early superstars of the game who eventually fades into oblivion, as generations go by.

You can get this book from the nice folks at Stillwater River Publications

In Ty Cobb’s Shadow

Happy Reading

Gregg

Tales From the Deadball Era-Some of the Wildest Times in Baseball History


Nostalgia is a dangerous thing.  If not used correctly it can skew the memories of people, times and places of bygone eras.  It can make one think and long for something that in hindsight we believe was much better than it really was.  Since Baseball has been around for almost a century and a half, there are many eras that none of use were able to witness first hand.  We rely on history books, the research of many and documentation to see what really happened.  The Deadball era is one that many people have a fondness for and like to learn about it as much as they can.  I recently found a book that allows those Deadball era lovers to get some inside stories of what the game was really like during that time, without succumbing to all that messy nostalgia.

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By: Mark Halfon – 2014

Tales From the Deadball Era allows readers to do some time traveling if you will.  It takes them back to when violence, segregation and gambling were some of the nicer things happening at the baseball games.  A time when fields were in disrepair, equipment was unsophisticated and quite honestly the final product was somewhat of a mess.  It was nothing like the showcase we get to witness on a daily basis today.

Halfon introduces us to some of the major events of the era.  Showing us these highlights along with some of the great personalities ever to play the game, he gives the reader a very complete picture of what was going on during this era.  He also shows some of the more lighthearted moments that infiltrated the game during that period.  Many of these things you would not even dream of as being part of the game today.  The book also shows how necessity is the mother of invention.  Things we normally accept as part of the game had to come from somewhere, and this book shows us those things we should all be thankful for.

If you fancy yourself a novice baseball historian this book is a good book for you.  It gives the reader a nice feel for this time period and will leave you wanting to find out more information about the Deadball era and its personalities.  If you fancy yourself a novice historian on the John Thorn level then you may want to stay away from this one.  If you are at that level you more than likely wont get any new information from this book.  Honestly most fans will enjoy reading this book and spending the time traveling back to these decades long ago.

You can get this book from the nice folks at Potomac Books

Tales From the Deadball Era

Happy Reading

Gregg