Tagged: cardinal publishing

The Little General – Gene Mauch A Baseball Life


I think there are many great injustices within the game of baseball.  From plays on the field that get called incorrectly to the many talented people who fall into the cracks of history.  There are too many baseball professionals that give their entire lives and every fiber of their beings to the game and in return do not receive the accolades they truly deserve.  Managers sometimes are a bunch that gets forgotten if they do not reach the pinnacle of the game.  Regardless of how they perform over their entire career, if they don’t win a World Series, they usually get forgotten when speaking of the greats.  Todays book takes a look at one of those people who truly was a great manager and gets forgotten when the conversation turns to Baseballs Greatest Managers.

By:Mel Proctor-2015

By:Mel Proctor-2015

I must admit I was very excited about this book.  Gene Mauch has for a long time topped my list of one of the best managers the game has had to offer during its history.  Always one to be saddled with the task of building a winner from the ground up, he never shied from a task like that and rose to the challenge of laying the groundwork for winning teams.

Mel Procter has taken a look at Gene Mauch’s entire career in this book.  From border line Major League player and star in the minors.  You get to see the passion and fire that was a Gene Mauch trademark on the field.  The reader sees what made Mauch tick and the drive that helped propel his small stature and guts into a hard-nosed player who earned the respect of teammates and fans alike.  Being a fan of Mauch this is something that I was not very familiar with.  There is plenty of documentation about his short stays in the Majors, but the Minor League stories were new ones to me, which helped paint a broader picture of his skills and his career.

Seizing the opportunity with the Phillies, the reader then journeys through his managerial career.  It shows the methodical nature that Mauch tried to build winners and the inherent struggles associated with trying to build from within during that era.  Gene’s next stops were Montreal, Minnesota and California, all of which saw varying degrees of improvement under Gene.  You see how his personality of hard-nosed play and determination is transmitted to his players, so maybe winning is contagious after all.  The only down side to the manager portion of the story is that I would have liked to see some more stories about the Twins and Angels.  Those sections weren’t as long as the ones about Philly and Montreal, but when you have a career that spans this many decades you probably have to make some cuts somewhere.

Mel Proctor should be very proud of this book.  He has given complete and honest coverage to a baseball personality that I think gets shafted sometimes.  Just because he came within one pitch of actually making the World Series and was also the captain of the Titanic in Philadelphia in 1964 does not make him a bad manager.  To the contrary I think Mauch was one of the more dedicated and smarter managers in the game during his era and was unfortunately the victim of some bad baseball timing.  There are other managers in the Hall of Fame with multiple World Series trophies that are there partly due to the pinstripes they wore.  I think man for man, Gene Mauch could outshine many of them.

Check out this book for yourself and give Gene Mauch the respect he deserves.  After a life long dedication to the game, he deserves at least that much and honestly baseball fans will enjoy this one.  This may be one of the few chances we as fans get to learn about the real Gene Mauch

You can get this book from the nice folks at Cardinal Publishing

http://www.cardinalpub.com/store/the-little-general-gene-mauch/

Happy Reading

Gregg

The 50 Greatest……….Fill in the Blank


It’s the day after the 2015 All-Star Game and MLB has released the Franchise Four for each of the teams.  Depending on your personal feelings you may agree or disagree with the results, but honestly how do you even measure such things?  Anytime one compiles a list of the Greatest of anything, how much of it is really objective and how much of it is emotionally based.  I know my Franchise Four votes all had some sort of emotional tie to them.  So where does this fit in with Baseball books?  There are hundreds of books out there that compile some sort of all-time greatest list.  So how do you know when you are getting an objective view, instead of what that particular author thinks?  I think I have found two that are good sources for the fans.

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Both of the above books were written by Lew Freedman and released in 2015.  If that name sounds familiar to veteran baseball readers, it is because Freeman has penned dozens of books about baseball in the past and these are two of his latest.  Freedman is a veteran sportswriter that likes to delve into the obscure and often forgotten names of the game.  Here he has compiled lists of the 50 greatest players to wear the respective team uniforms.  I have read a few of Freedman’s works in the past and always found the books to be educational and historically honest.  I expected no different from these titles.

I will start with the Pirates book.  They have been in Pittsburgh for a very long time and had some very big names call the steel city home.  So I thought it was going to be hard to limit the pick to just the 50 greatest.  Some of the names were easy picks such as, Clemente, Stargell, Kiner, Wagner and Traynor.  But then there were a few others that at first glance made me ask why, names such as Hebner, Giles, Kendall, Bonilla and Thomas.  Each chapter in the book ranging from 3-8 pages is dedicated to each player.  You get a career bio, personal bio and why that player was special to his team.  Even though the chapters are brief it does give you just enough information to see why that player was a vital cog in the machine.  It gives a nice quick, detailed and informative overview of some of the greatest names to ever wear the uniform.

The Tigers book follows the exact same format and allows the reader to see who has stopped in the Motor City throughout their storied history.  Cobb, Kaline, Gehringer, Greenberg and Kell were all easy picks for this list for me.  But names like Steve Kemp and Pat Mullin made me scratch my head and ask why.  The value in these books is that the name might surprise you, but the facts help back up the pick.  So there is knowledge to be gained for the reader if you are not very familiar with each specific team history.

These type of books also have another feature, beyond just being able to read them.  If you ask 100 people to compile this list, you will get 100 different replies.  If you and your friends enjoy talking about the history of the game, these books become both great conversation starters and reference guides.  The format of the book being each player is his own chapter makes finding facts about that particular player a breeze.  These books will be a valuable asset in a fans library if ever some fact checking needed to be done to win a bet.

Each of Lew Freedman’s books I have read in the past have all met a very high standard and these two new ones are no exception.  Fans of the specific teams will love them and have the knowledge to agree or disagree with the picks in the books.  If your knowledge of the specific team is not very strong these books are still valuable to the reader.  It will allow you to strengthen your knowledge of some of the greats and not so greats in the game’s history, as well as decide whom you really think are the 50 greatest players of that team.  In the end you may not agree with all 50 of the picks but it definitely gets you to start thinking.

You can get these books from the nice folks at Cardinal Publishing Group

http://www.cardinalpub.com/store/50-greatest-tigers-every-fan-know/

http://www.cardinalpub.com/store/50-greatest-tigers-every-fan-know/

Happy Reading

Gregg