Tagged: barry bonds

There’s No Place Like Home

When a team changes cities it is a daunting process.  Ownership has to make sure it crosses all its T’s and dots all its I’s to make sure everything will be to their, and more importantly their fans liking.  No where as near as common place as it once was, team transfers can be a great thing for those involved.  New stadiums, new fan base, a whole new chance to invent yourself and the financial rewards usually aren’t too bad either.  That is just what the New York giants were hoping for with their move to San Francisco.  A shiny new stadium to call home accompanied with lots of parking spaces for ownership to sell each night helped sell them on their new locale.  But sometimes all is not what you hope it will be, and todays book takes a look at the Giants move to California and good or bad, depending on where you stood, their new Home Sweet Home.


We are all well aware of the story of the Dodgers moving to Los Angeles and their conquering of the Southern California market.  Sometimes lost in that great shadow is the Giants, who abandoned the Polo Grounds and the city of New York at the exact same time to help usher in baseball across the continent.  Walter O’Malley was larger than life at times and in that shadow one can understand how Horace Stoneham may have fallen by the wayside.  So with that, it easy to forget the history of the Giants during the first years in California.  Luckily for us this book shows us what it took to get the Giants in place in San Fran and the hopes ownership had for the new frontier.

Robert Garrett does a good job of giving us the background of the team in New York and the situation it found itself in during the late 50’s.  From stadium woes to the personality of Horace Stoneham you get a pretty good feel of what it was like for the team during their waning days in New York.  He shows the courtship of the Giants by a new city and the promises bestowed by the local government, the biggest of all being a new stadium.

Stoneham had a somewhat of a hands off approach to his new stadium as the book shows and it in turn came to bite him in the butt.  Candlestick Park had its own set of issues that are well chronicled in the book which in turn snowballed, enough so that it would essentially destroy many of the dreams of what Stoneham had for this new venture.  In the end it is one of the driving factors that ends the Stoneham ownership of the team.

Next we look at the struggles to find new ownership and the quest to keep the Giants in San Francisco less than twenty years after the had arrived.  Once new ownership was found you see the same struggles of old ownership with the albatross of Candlestick still dangling around its neck.  It shows an interesting look at how baseball operated in regards to stadiums, success at the gate and play on the field.  You see how the Giants, except for a few years as a whole, struggled while they called Candlestick home.  It’s also shown how the people of San Fran really didn’t care if they ever got out of there.

Finally, you see a final change on ownership that get the Giants to a new frontier and a stadium worthwhile of Major League Baseball and the success that comes with that type of arena.   I honestly think this book is a great look at this era of Giants baseball, no matter how bad it was on the field.  It’s a portion of team history that gets overshadowed by the Los Angeles Dodgers moving at the same time, the expansion of baseball and the evolving changes that were going on in both baseball and society.  It proves some dreams take longer than others to come to fruition.

If you have an interest in California baseball during this era this book is definitely worth checking out.  You can get this book from the nice folks at the University of Nebraska Press.

Home Team-The Turbulent History of the S.F. Giants

Happy Reading








Someone Interrupted My Baseball Blog!!!

It’s really no secret that I like baseball books.  Up until recently I spent all my waking moments reading them while not working.  The key part of that last sentence is “up until recently”.  Something has gotten in the way of my reading and writing time and significantly made me cut down on my posts.  Now I am realistic in the fact that probably no one other than a few publishers have noticed that I have not written much in the past two months and I realize there is not a single person out there thinking “Gosh, I miss Gregg’s amazing baseball book posts”.   But this being a project I enjoy doing, I figured I would offer some explanation of whats going on.  If you have followed this site over the last year, you have read about the forthcoming life changes, surgery and a trip that in the end was aborted for numerous reasons.  Several weeks back the biggest life change arrived and since that very moment nothing has been the same in any way, shape or form.


Meet the newest bookworm-Aubrey Rose

This little munchkin is the reason for all the mayhem.  She arrived on August 18th (yes, I was reading Fastball John waiting for the delivery) and has disrupted our flow of life in so many wonderful ways.  She has cut into my reading time and destroyed anything resembling a good nights sleep, but my Wife Brina and I are loving it in so many amazing ways.

I have been working on her baseball book collection a few months before she arrived and thanks to Facebook friend Debby Brown, she received her first official Phillies book today. So her book collection is starting to come along very nicely.  She doesn’t know it yet but she is a Phillies fan.  Good or bad, that’s how this house rolls.  We have had lots of early morning feedings with the baseball game replaying on the TV in the dark and that manicured green grass gets her attention every time.  So I think we will have no problem raising another fan.

So how does this all tie into baseball books?  Well, I am glad you asked that very important question.  I have several review copies waiting for me on my desk, and to all, I just ask that you be patient.  I will not forget anyone, it may just take me longer than I had hoped to get some books done.  I did not realize how life changing, in a great way mind you, this addition to our family was really going to be.  Because quite honestly every time I try and read, this is the look  I get……………


……….so it does slow me down a bit.  But I promise everyone who sent me a book, your time will come.  For those of you that have enjoyed this blog over the last two years I appreciate the support and look forward to many more books together.  Its my love of baseball books that brought me to do this blog and I have been lucky enough to make some great new friends along the way as well.

I have about 30 books on tap to get us through the Winter together, and hopefully Aubrey allows me a little more time to get them read.  Either that, or she learns how to read sooner rather than later so she can help me out on the reviews.

Wish me luck in figuring out parenthood.  The only thing I know for sure is she can not date until at least age 35!  Everything other than that is a work in progress ;).

Happy Reading

Gregg………and Aubrey too!


The Great Baseball Revolt-The Rise and Fall of the 1890 Players League

If you look at baseball history as a whole, it encompasses a large amount of time. Thousands of people and events are all part of the greater story for thousands of reasons. Some of those events get lost to the passage of time, and rightly so.  Just because an event happened does not mean it had any significance to the history of the game itself, it was just the action within the game.  Some events have been suppressed from the history books, for selfish reasons by those involved.  Today’s book takes a look at one of those events and how they helped shape the game as it now known.


By Robert Ross-2016

Robert Ross has done some heavy lifting with producing this book.  He takes a look at the 1890 Players League that was formed as a rival league to the existing National League.  It offered better salaries and player shares of ownership to play in the league.  This was in contrast to the business dealings of the National league already in existence.  It also allowed the Players League to outdraw the Nationals by the end of the season.  It is a valuable history lesson and shows the power the players have always had and what ownership would like to keep quiet.

This is truly one of the earliest player labor organization movements in the history of the game.  They organized, had some backers and on most fronts were a success.  While their success was for only one year, it shows the powers that the players held and what obstacles they could overcome if they worked together.  In the end it was the fact that National League owners inflated their attendance numbers and cooked their books to the point that it made the Players League look inept.  In the end that was the main downfall of the Players League.

After this failure the Owners held the upper hand for generations and the formation  of the Major League Baseball Players Association almost 75 years later was the first real inroad the players made toward leveling the field with Ownership.  This is where it would have been a benefit to former players to be students of the game.  If they realized they held the power and had banned together sooner, they could have realized better pay and individual rights sooner than they had.  This whole theory could have changed the way free agency came about and would have revolutionized the entire game sooner.

If you have any interest in the labor side of baseball, or rival league history  this book would be a good choice for you.  Yes it happened over a century ago, but it definitely is something that could have changed the direction labor relations took over the past 115 years.  This is one of those history lessons ownership to this day would like to under cover.  Because even today some of these principles could be used to the players benefit.

You can get this book from the nice folks at the University of Nebraska Press

The Great Baseball Revolt

Happy Reading




The Most Wonderful Week of the Year

Why are we baseball fans?  What draws you to the game?  Is it something tangible or is it a feeling you get from watching it?  Is it the same reason that it was when you were 13, 43 or 63 years old?  Obviously everyone will have a different answer and quite honestly there is no wrong answer.  One thing we all have in common is at one point in our lives, every single one of us wanted to be out on that field as a member of the pros.  That dream faded for many of us when we realized we had not one bit of talent to back it up.  Today’s book takes a look at one of the very few who were lucky enough to keep that little boy’s dream alive inside themselves, and while it may be 40 years behind his schedule it is still a monumental dream fulfilled.


By Roy Berger-2014

Roy Berger is an average guy just like the rest of us.  Making a home, enjoying his family and friends and raising his kids to the best of his abilities.  But deep down inside he had that dream that to some degree we all still have, he wanted to be a major league baseball player.  While reality sets in for all of us when we realize we don’t have the ability to back up the dream, all of us like Roy never totally let go of that dream.  Being a Pittsburgh Pirates fan in his youth, the 50th anniversary of the 1960 World Series Champions led for a unique opportunity for Roy to make his dreams come true.

Fantasy Camps to me were always a toy for the rich fans.  The ability to hob-nob with the heroes of yesteryear and the chance to be shoulder to shoulder with them out on the battlefield.  Now while I still believe these are the tools of the affluent fan, this book shows us how much dedication one has to put into playing in a fantasy camp along with proving no matter what your financial status is in life, you can’t put a dollar sign on your dreams.

Roy Berger takes us on his journey through four Fantasy Camps.  He starts with his first true love the Pittsburgh Pirates celebrating the 50th anniversary of the 1960 team.  The Pittsburgh Pirates being the first love of his youth was a logical starting point and provided good value for the money.  He shows the reader how any fan might feel going into the first fantasy camp and it gives you a good feel for what these camps are all about.  It also shows how addictive the game of baseball really is to true lifetime fans.

His second year he takes us on tour with the Detroit Tigers.  The combination of rain delays and cancellations at that camp plus the fact that he had no real attachment to the Detroit Tigers led to his worst experience of all the visits.  It was the lowest price of all the camps he attended and proves the adage you get what you pay for.   This trip also showed that even though he was a player in his late 50’s that he still treated the game with respect and went through the needed preparation to give it his best.

His third year, 2012, Roy takes us to his adult adopted team, the New York Yankees fantasy camp.  The highest priced of all the camps, because its the Yankees and they can do it, it offered the most amenities along with the opportunities to hob nob with the most players. An overall great experience both on and off the field, the only downside of course was the price.

Roy’s final fantasy camp took us back to the Pirates, which to me seems to be the best value of all the camps he attended.  A combination of on field injuries and Father Time catching up with Roy made this his poorest performance at any of the camps and lowest showing in the camps final standings for any of the teams he had been on.

This book is a great example of how no matter how old we are, we never can outgrow that little kid inside of each of us that wants to play baseball.  I find it amazing that grown men will pay thousands of dollars for a week of playing baseball with some of their heroes.  It is also the opportunity for grown men and women to create new friendships that endure year to year.  Without doubt this is very a unique opportunity and one that price will ever forbid me from partaking in, and at any age, but if I could afford it I would most certainly go.

Roy’s book does a great job of showing the reader what one goes through in a Fantasy Camp.  It is not just show up and play ball, because at our age (over 40) most of our bodies would just laugh at us if we tried that.  He shows the preparation and dedication required to play  and the most important what it takes to not look like an idiot in front of your heroes.  It shows that no matter how old we get, as long as you can write the check,  baseball will always keep us young at heart.

If you have any sort of inner child this book is great for you.  It will show you where baseball may lead you if you always stay true to both yourself and the game.  You can get this book direct from Roy Berger himself.

The Most Wonderful Week of the Year

Happy Reading




Odds and Ends-Spring 2016

I figured with my extended time off to recuperate I would have plenty of time to write on my blog.  Boy was  I wrong, between needing to get up and walk around every ten minutes because I am stiffening up and the fact the the medicines keep knocking me out, I am having trouble finding the time to write, let alone read.  But, what it has done is given me the chance to look at some books that I would not always feel were the correct fit for an entire single post.  The book could be too short, it could be a coffee table book or it could be a book that doesn’t really target my audience.  These are in no way bad books, because honestly if they sucked, I wouldn’t waste the time putting them on here for everyone to look at them, but there is a format issue that doesn’t work well within my bookcase. So from time to time we do one of these multi book posts to clean up one of the shelves in the bookcase……and share some of these books to the world.  So here we go…..

Baseball’s No -Hit Wonders-More than a Century of Pitching’s Greatest Feats

By Dirk Lammars-2016


Is it me, or do no hitters seem to happen more often today then they did say thirty of forty years ago?  Has the level of play in the league diminished that much that these have become commonplace?  Lammers takes the readers through the interesting history of the no hitter and how it has played out through the history of the game. He shows the pitchers and hitters involved, no hitters that were broken up after 26 outs and all the other odd and wacky things that happened in the past to those pitchers, both lucky and good enough to even flirt with a no-no.  If your interested in the who, what, when, where and why of no-hitters you will really enjoy what this book will bring to your table.  You can get this book from the nice folks at Unbridled Books


The 50 Greatest Players in Pittsburgh Pirates History

By David Finoli-2016


These types of books are always fun.  For the one and only reason that no two people will ever agree 100 percent as to who belongs at what spot on the list. I really don’t know what the criteria is by the authors to make it on to these types of lists, but they never seem to disappoint the reader.  They always include the Hall of Famers, team superstars as well as the hometown heroes. You would also have to think they target their specified teams fan base so they are always eager to please the homers.  I had done this type of book by another author on the Pittsburgh Pirates last year and I went back to pull it out to compare.  What I found is that more then half of the players they can agree on being in the book,, but differ on where they rank.  So bottom line is if you read one of these books about your team and find another one, check it out because it may give you a different spin on the players that may be more in line with your personal rankings as well.  You can get this book from the nice folks at Rowman & Littlefield


The BUCS!-The Story of the Pittsburgh Pirates

By John McCollister-2016


Lets stay in Pittsburgh  for a second on this book.  The BUCS! takes a very brief look at the history of the Pittsburgh Pirates.  From its 19th century beginnings to its current day under field manager Clint Hurdle, this book takes an abbreviated, but fast paced look at the history in Pittsburgh.  If the Pirates are not your team and never have been in the past, this book is a great way to get a good albeit brief history from Kiner and Roberto to Bonds and McCutchen.  Its only roughly 200 pages, so even if you are familiar with Bucs history it would be a quick and easy refresher course.  You can get this book from the nice folks at Lyons Press.

The Legends of the Philadelphia Phillies

By Bob Gordon-2016



What would one of these posts be without a Phillies book?  This book, first released by Bob Gordon in 2005, compiles some of the greatest names in Phillies history and gives strong bios on each of those lucky enough to be a Phillie. It gives a great look at team history from an author that has some great ties to the team itself, through several other books he has written.  So why do you need to buy the reprint of a book released ten years ago?  It has been updated for deaths of the older players and it also has added a few Phillies superstars that became prominent in the last half of the last decade when the Phillies were on top of the world.  You can get this book from the nice folks at Sports Publishing.


The Grind-Inside Baseball’s Endless Season

By Barry Svrluga-2015


Without question, Baseball has the most grueling schedule of all the professional leagues.  Almost stretching to nine months of the year when you factor in pre and post season, it would take some sort of toll on even the strongest of personalities.  Svrluga has taken a look at this relentless schedule and the effect it has on the personal lives of those involved and how it effects almost everyone involved with a team.  It looks at varying position players , the 26th man on most rosters, travelling secretaries, spouses, kids and clubhouse attendants.  It really is an interesting look behind the scenes of the game and what those involved are willing to sacrifice to be a part of the great game of baseball. You van get this book from the nice folks at Blue Rider Press


Diamond Madness-Classic Episodes of Rowdyism, Racism and Violence in Major League Baseball

By William A. Cook-2013


William Cook’s Diamond Madness gives the reader a good look at the scary side of baseball.  When you get beyond all of the normal hero worship that comes as part of the normal territory with the game and when those things get really scary.  Fan obsessions, death threats, violence, racism, shootings and robberies are all just a part of what is shown to the readers of this book.  It is amazing how even though these are normal stories in the everyday world, they are so many times magnified just by playing baseball.  It also goes to show how much work the people behind the scenes in baseball put in to making sure nothing tarnishes the wholesomeness of the American Past-time.  I think if you check this out it will show some new perspectives to the average fan of what really goes on.  You can get this book from the nice folks at Sunbury Press.


Tales From the Atlanta Braves Dugout

By Cory McCartney-2016


I will admit it………..I love this series!   You can get whatever team you wish at this point because it seems like almost every team is available now.  You can also use it as a history lesson to brush up on all the funny stories of a team that you are not very familiar with and get a good feel for what that teams history is all about.  If you grab the book of your favorite team it is a chance to regale in all the stories you have heard time and time again and like a favorite uncle at a holiday dinner, are glad to listen to over and over.  You can get this book from the nice folks at Sports Publishing.



I See the Crowd Roar-The Story of William “Dummy” Hoy

By Joseph Rotheli & Agnes Gaertner-2014

This book is intended for a younger audience but it does provide a very deep lesson for all fans.  William Hoy was hearing impaired and never heard a single fan cheer for him.  The book shows how Hoy overcame his disability and made the best if it as well as keeping up a positive attitude during the course of events.  The book also shows the positive impact had on the function of the game and how things like hand signals that were originally implemented for Hoy alone, have become mainstays of the game generations later.  It truly is an inspiring story that younger fans should be made aware of so they have a complete baseball education.  There is also a movie version of the book in the pipeline as well.  You can get this book from the nice folks at the lil-red-foundation.


Black Baseball, Black Business-Race Enterprise and the Fate of the Segregated Dollar

By Roberta Newman & Joel Nathan Rosen-2014


In baseball nothing is ever as simple as it seems.  This book takes a look at how the integration of baseball, while a great thing on the civil rights front, created waves that destroyed black economies in the larger cities that were homes to Negro League Teams.  It is a really interesting look at the economies of the integration of baseball on those parties that were not in any way involved in the decision making process or the game of baseball itself.  It also shows how the innocents involved were essentially destroyed by the baseball powers that were at the time pushing it as a cause for greater good.

Happy Reading



Baseball’s Power Shift-How the Players Union, the Fans and the Media Changed America’s Sports Culture

This time of year with Spring Training in full swing, it reminds us of all the exciting possibilities this upcoming year has to offer.  Everyone is looking forward to all the games and highlights in the near future, but the business end of baseball is the furthest thing from most fans minds.  Truth be told, somewhere, someone is attending to the business end of the game and always has.  Most fans don’t think about the contract negotiations that take place, the players working conditions that the union fights for or the meal money stipend the players get.  These are all the realities of the game and have been for decades.  It may be hard to comprehend for the average fan why these are important and further more how they arrived at where they stand today, but today’s book takes the time to explain what has transpired throughout the history of the game in regards to working conditions.


By: Krister Swanson-2016

Krister Swanson has created a really interesting book.  It starts from the very early years of the game and shows what relations were like between the owners and players.  It was more of a parental relationship versus a business one.  It shows how the owners were able to realize what an advantages they had in the reserve clause and how to  use it to their own benefit.  The author shows how owners were able to maintain low salaries and reap all the rewards without having to share almost anything with their players.

Swanson also shows that the players started to realize how they were being exploited by the owners and attempted to improve conditions both on the field and monetarily.  The few feeble attempts at first which finally led to the formation of the MLBPA are chronicled in these pages.  I don’t think the owners or the establishment of the game itself had any idea what the possibilities were for the newly formed union.  It shows the union’s rise to power, how the media helped that and the fans sympathy that would help them along their journey.  The book also covers the few short strikes and lockouts along the way that occurred, just to keep things interesting.

The problem I had with the book is it seemed to stop the history lesson after the 1981 players strike.  I know as a fan, there were other strikes that occurred after 1981 and they were very influential on the shape of the game we now know.  Obviously there are other books out there that cover these strikes, but I think for complete coverage of the topic it should have been included in some shape or form in this book.  The only other problem I had was it said that Bob Feller played his entire career for the Braves.  I mean for me that is a huge error that should have been caught by someone.

Overall this is a very entertaining book.  It gives a great and thorough history lesson that even the most die hard baseball fan will be able to gain some knowledge from, plus the early years of labor relations within the game are not always widely covered.

You can get this book from the nice folks at the University of Nebraska Press

Power Shift

Happy Reading



Swish Nicholson-Wartime Baseball’s Leading Slugger

With this week’s Hall of Fame vote finally announced, you get to see how many truly amazing players that played the game.  Every year we fight about the superstars and who deserves to be enshrined this year.  Beyond these greats are the people who are the backbone of the game.  The good and borderline great players who are not Hall worthy but still had really good careers.  There are also the people who had solid days on the field but were honestly nothing memorable otherwise.  For every Hall of Fame caliber player there are hundreds of other players that fell below them in the grand scheme of the game.  It is important that history does not forget these types of players.  Through their hard work and dedication they have helped forge the story of baseball.  Today’s book takes a look at one of those players that had a good career, that while not Hall worthy, still was good enough to be respected and admired by various generations.


By:Robert A. Greenberg-2008

I went into this book only familiar with Swish Nicholson’s time with the Philadelphia Phillies.  A member of the beloved Whiz Kids, he was a name that Phillies fans were accustomed to hearing as one of the Philly greats.  It turns out before Bill ever stopped in my hometown, he had a really incredible career in the Windy City with the Cubs, but was hindered by the fact that his prime was during the height of World War II.  Being a wartime slugger discounted his achievements on the field because the rest of the world felt all the best players were off serving in the military.  This fact created the perception of Swish Nicholson’s career as not being as good as his numbers portrayed, because the competition was not up to its normal MLB standard.

This book makes a very solid attempt at showing Nicholson’s career in the correct light it deserves.  It gives a lot of background on his personal life and growing up in the early 20th century.  The book gives the reader a real feel of what Bill Nicholson was like off the field, as well as what kind of exceptional player he was on it.  This book also shows life after baseball and with older players, I find it interesting to see their transition back into regular life.  It is so different than what modern players have to go through.  It has to be very hard to go from being a star on the field to a regular guy working 9 to 5 and punching a clock.

Book like this are important in that they keep the memories of players whom may not have been Hall of Fame worthy alive in the minds of baseball fans.  Books like this bring the past back to life and show readers various eras of the game they have only heard of through stories of older generations.  Fans should check out Swish Nicholson, it is one of those books that is both entertaining and educational for everyone.

You can get this book from the nice folks at McFarland

“Swish” Nicholson

Happy Reading