Tagged: 1964 phillies

Fred Hutchinson and the 1964 Cincinnati Reds


Throughout baseball history there are some amazing stories.  Stories that if you tried to have someone from Hollywood write it, the general public would never believe it was true.  The down side to these stories is unless the are juicy and so far out of this world against the odds, they sometimes get lost to the annals of baseball history.  One such story is the one involving Fred Hutchinson and the Reds of 1964.  When one talks about 1964 the big story out of the National League is the collapse of the Philadelphia Phillies and how the St. Louis Cardinals when the dust settled were the National League champions.  The third sister at the dance that year was the Cincinnati Reds and as the last day unfolded they were right there trying to win the pennant as well.  In the end the Reds came up short but the fascinating underlying story of that team was that their manager was fighting terminal cancer the entire season.  Hutchinson’s work for most of the year along with fill-in skipper Dick Sisler, got the Reds within one step of the World Series.  While today’s book is not a new release, in my opinion it is an often overlooked story in baseball history that from time to time needs to be brought back to the forefront.

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By: Doug Wilson-2010

Doug Wilson for me is one of those writers that could write a phone book in such a way that I would find it interesting.  His other works that I have been exposed to Brooks about Brooks Robinson and The Bird about Mark Fidrych are both top notch biographies and were reviewed on this site in previous posts.  This book predates both of the other two books I mentioned above but I expected nothing but the same quality book from Wilson on this one.  I am glad to report that I was not disappointed.

Doug Wilson starts out the book by giving a nice background on Fred Hutchinson.  His personal background, his playing career, time spent managing in Seattle, Detroit and St. Louis showing how his baseball personality was shaped along the way.  The book also shows us how the first few years Hutchinson spent shaping the Reds into contenders including an unexpected trip to the 1961 World Series.  It also shows how he handled up and coming superstars such as Pete Rose and how he helped mold them into winners as well.

Obviously the biggest part of the book is spent discussing the 1964 season and how right before it Hutchinson was diagnosed with his terminal cancer.  In December 1963 Hutchinson was diagnosed with his illness and from the start the prognosis was not good.  1964 from the start for the Cincinnati Reds was dedicated to the fight for the life of Fred Hutchinson and both he and his Reds fought a valiant fight from day one of the season.  Unfortunately Fred Hutchinson’s health did not allow him to make it through the season and he was replaced by Dick Sisler.  The Cinicnnati Reds fell a bit short on winning the N.L. Pennant for Hutch and subsequently he passed away a few weeks later.

It is a very compelling story from beginning to end and if it happened in todays world the outcome for Fred Hutchinson may have been very different as well as the media coverage given to his story.  Disney would have grabbed on to it and made a movie out of it, Major League Baseball would have had an official business partner for it and we would have been inundated with lots of things regarding Hutch’s situation from Joe Buck each week on the national telecast.  It is a perfect example as to how the business aspect of the game has changed and how they can and will use anything they find marketable.

Getting back to the book, Doug Wilson did a great job of sharing the story of Fred Hutchinson.  It is a story that will eventually get lost to the annals of time, but nonetheless should be remembered.  If this story was based in New York or Los Angeles I think the media play on it would have been much more, but Cincinnati was propbably just not flashy enough for the powers that be.  Wilson gave the reader a real good look at the subject and while being a sad subject , turns it into an enjoyable experience for the reader.  I would obviously recommend it to Reds fans, but all readers should check it out for the valuable history lesson contained within.

You can get this book from the nice folks at McFarland

Fred Hutchinson and the 1964 Cincinnati Reds

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

The Little General – Gene Mauch A Baseball Life


I think there are many great injustices within the game of baseball.  From plays on the field that get called incorrectly to the many talented people who fall into the cracks of history.  There are too many baseball professionals that give their entire lives and every fiber of their beings to the game and in return do not receive the accolades they truly deserve.  Managers sometimes are a bunch that gets forgotten if they do not reach the pinnacle of the game.  Regardless of how they perform over their entire career, if they don’t win a World Series, they usually get forgotten when speaking of the greats.  Todays book takes a look at one of those people who truly was a great manager and gets forgotten when the conversation turns to Baseballs Greatest Managers.

By:Mel Proctor-2015

By:Mel Proctor-2015

I must admit I was very excited about this book.  Gene Mauch has for a long time topped my list of one of the best managers the game has had to offer during its history.  Always one to be saddled with the task of building a winner from the ground up, he never shied from a task like that and rose to the challenge of laying the groundwork for winning teams.

Mel Procter has taken a look at Gene Mauch’s entire career in this book.  From border line Major League player and star in the minors.  You get to see the passion and fire that was a Gene Mauch trademark on the field.  The reader sees what made Mauch tick and the drive that helped propel his small stature and guts into a hard-nosed player who earned the respect of teammates and fans alike.  Being a fan of Mauch this is something that I was not very familiar with.  There is plenty of documentation about his short stays in the Majors, but the Minor League stories were new ones to me, which helped paint a broader picture of his skills and his career.

Seizing the opportunity with the Phillies, the reader then journeys through his managerial career.  It shows the methodical nature that Mauch tried to build winners and the inherent struggles associated with trying to build from within during that era.  Gene’s next stops were Montreal, Minnesota and California, all of which saw varying degrees of improvement under Gene.  You see how his personality of hard-nosed play and determination is transmitted to his players, so maybe winning is contagious after all.  The only down side to the manager portion of the story is that I would have liked to see some more stories about the Twins and Angels.  Those sections weren’t as long as the ones about Philly and Montreal, but when you have a career that spans this many decades you probably have to make some cuts somewhere.

Mel Proctor should be very proud of this book.  He has given complete and honest coverage to a baseball personality that I think gets shafted sometimes.  Just because he came within one pitch of actually making the World Series and was also the captain of the Titanic in Philadelphia in 1964 does not make him a bad manager.  To the contrary I think Mauch was one of the more dedicated and smarter managers in the game during his era and was unfortunately the victim of some bad baseball timing.  There are other managers in the Hall of Fame with multiple World Series trophies that are there partly due to the pinstripes they wore.  I think man for man, Gene Mauch could outshine many of them.

Check out this book for yourself and give Gene Mauch the respect he deserves.  After a life long dedication to the game, he deserves at least that much and honestly baseball fans will enjoy this one.  This may be one of the few chances we as fans get to learn about the real Gene Mauch

You can get this book from the nice folks at Cardinal Publishing

http://www.cardinalpub.com/store/the-little-general-gene-mauch/

Happy Reading

Gregg

Back in Action – With a Little Phillies Love


Well the move is over, and as I live among the piles of boxes awaiting unpacking and finding new homes, I figured now was as good a time as any to post a new blog.  A majority of the books aren’t unpacked yet, but in due time they will adorn the shelves again.  For those of you familiar with me, my love for the Phillies has been well documented, so I figured let’s get back in the saddle with a Phillies book today.

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By:Robert Gordon-2013

When you have been in existence for over 130 years and had limited success in that time frame as the Phillies have had, your great moments are few and far between.  You have limited happy stories to draw from and a few miserable failures that stick in the fans crawl for a long, long time.  If you are familiar with the Phillies you know these stories all to well.  The Championships, the Pennants and of course 1964.

Robert Gordon has compiled these familiar highs and lows in his book and presented them to the Phillies fans.  He has intertwined interviews with former players, coaches and people associated with the team at the appropriate time.  They are thorough interviews that give an added perspective beyond the authors, and enhance the story itself.  The facts are well presented for fans of the Phillies to appreciate their inglorious history at most times.

Here is my problem with this book.  If you are a dedicated Phillies fan, you already know these stories by heart.  You have lived and died by these stories your entire life and they have become part of your Phillies soul.  For Phillies fans there are already countless books out there hashing through these anecdotes, so except for the personal interviews, you are not getting too much new information.  By far, this is not a bad book.  It is well written, accurate and entertaining.  Just for my personal taste I was hoping for something new.  If you are not familiar with Phillies history and want to learn more about them, this would be a great book for you.  If you are familiar with the team and hoping for some new stories or inside dirt, you may be disappointed.

Check it out and see what you think, maybe I am just in too deep with my love for the Phillies, that it makes it difficult for me after a while to go down the same road over and over again.

You can get this book from the nice folks at Triumph Books

http://www.triumphbooks.com/-then-bowa-said-to-schmidt——-products-9781600788017.php?page_id=21

Happy Reading

Gregg