Category: World Series

One-Year Dynasty-Inside the Rise and Fall of the 1986 Mets


With it being the thirtieth anniversary of the 1986 Mets, I figured we would be seeing more than a fair share of Mets related books.  It is inevitable that some are going to be really good and some are going to be repetitious and unnecessary.  I mean how many ways would authors be able to spin the Mets and their championship year.  While so far this year there has been heavy saturation in the market of the 1986 Mets I am glad to say today’s book is one of the good ones out there.

51AzuE-H51L._SX329_BO1,204,203,200_

By Matthew Silverman-2016

When I first saw this one from Matthew Silverman I was a little hesitant.  I reviewed his previous work Swinging ’73 and was a little disappointed.  In the end I am glad I gave this one a chance because it was a great history lesson for a non-Mets fan.

Silverman walks the reader through a brief Mets history, from their inception in 1962, through their rough patch in the early 80’s.  He shows the ups and downs of the franchise during that period and also shows how the wheels were set in motion for their winning of the World Series in 1986.  He looks at player drafts and personnel moves that helped shaped a solid nucleus for the Mets.  Finally some free agent acquisitions put the icing on the cake for the Mets to become a powerhouse in the National League East.

Next the author guides the reader through the 1986 season and shows events that transpired both hurting and helping the Mets as the season progressed.  The post-season is then showcased for the reader to see how destiny played some sort of role in getting the Mets the World Series trophy when all the dust settled.  It shows how hungry the Mets and their fan base truly were for a winner in Queens and how beloved the team had become in New York.

The final section of the book looks at the decline of the Mets and how they never repeated their championship.  It is a very interesting look at what demons haunted the team and how in the end a lot of these personal demons were the demise of the Mets.  You expect injuries to be a problem with a team, but some of those issues that plagued this team were unforeseeable.

Matthew Silverman has done a nice job with this book.  It shows the complete story of what the 1986 New York Mets were all about.  The book does not just show the team at the top of its game.  He shows the reader the complete bell curve of the team and why certain movements on that curve happened when they did.  Silverman has a very tough road ahead of him in the fact that he has so much competition this year in the field of New York Mets books.  He did a great job of keeping the reader entertained and the story moving along at a good pace.  He covered a lot of ground in this book and none if it felt like it was being glossed over.  If you are a fan of Mets baseball you should check this one out, because it paints a very complete picture of the team.

You can get this book from the nice folks at Lyons Press

One-Year Dynasty

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

 

Kings of Queens-Life Beyond Baseball With the ’86 Mets


Some teams leave an indelible mark on the history of baseball.  Everyone likes remembering the greats such as the 60 Pittsburgh Pirates, 76 New York Yankees, 69 New York Mets, 68 Detroit Tigers and my personal favorite, the 80 Philadelphia Phillies, are just a few of the teams that make the grade.  Even beyond these there a few teams that stand higher above all the rest as the most memorable teams.  The 1986 New York Mets are in a class all by themselves.  A team of rough and ragged players that worked their way into the hearts of New Yorkers, and turned the baseball establishment on its ear for one glorious season.  Erik Sherman has written a new book that takes a look at some of the key players from that team and where their lives have gone both in and out of baseball.

61gSG7OeBFL._SX327_BO1,204,203,200_

By Erik Sherman-2016

Being that 2016 is the 30th anniversary of their championship season, and the fact that the Mets surprisingly made it to the World Series last year I expected a large selection of Mets themed books this year.  The ones I have found so far all have varying themes.  The 1986 season as a whole is looked at by some, reliving Bill Buckner’s nightmare is approached by others, but this is the first one I have come across that looks at the individual players.

Erik Sherman dedicates a chapter to each of several key players he has interviewed from the 1986 New York Mets.   They discuss their contributions to the team and the instances of how they came about becoming a member of the Mets.  Sherman does in depth interviews with each of the players and you get a nice feel of what they think were the most important qualities of that team.  The players all make clear that they were proud to be a part of that team and some even show some disappointment that the Mets have not reached out after their playing days and done a better job of preserving team heritage.

One of the most important things I found in these interviews was that none of the players that had issues, on or off the field during this era, shied away from their indiscretions.  Everyone manned up and admitted their faults.  Perhaps that is just a product of growing older, but it was still refreshing to see former professional athletes admit to their mistakes.

You may not be a Mets fan but you have to give this team their due, honestly they were an interesting team to watch.  The circumstances that surrounded the team at times and the way they won the World Series are a better script then Hollywood would have been able to produce.  So put your team affiliation away and check this book out.  Erik Sherman does a great job with his book.  He asks honest and clear questions in his interviews and doesn’t pull any punches with the guys.  I have enjoyed Erik Sherman’s other work and have reviewed his books about Mookie Wilson,  Steve Blass and Glenn Burke in the past with positive results from all.

Take this walk down memory lane with the New York Mets of the past.  You will find it is time well spent and probably like I did, find it hard to believe this was 30 years ago.

You can get this book from the nice folks at Berkely Books

Kings of Queens

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

Game 7, 1986-Failure and Triumph in the Biggest Game of My Life


I think I am a fairly ordinary guy.  Growing older somewhat gracefully, as my inner child slowly calms down.  I think a by-product of growing older is your memory is not as great as it used to be.  If you asked me what I ate for breakfast a few days ago, I may have trouble giving you the correct answer.  Another side effect of the passage of time on the memory is nostalgia.  You may romanticize things and enjoy them much more today than you actually did thirty years ago.  In the last few years there have been books published that dissect a game from several decades prior, inning by inning and pitch by pitch, which leads to my first of many questions.  How do players remember everything that happened during a specific game, every thought process, every tobacco spit and every sneer at an opposing player.  If you ask why am I asking such a silly question, please see the sentence above about my breakfast.  Anyhow, today’s book follows this same format about game seven of one of the most dramatic World Series in recent memory.

125006919X

By:Ron Darling-2016

The 1986 World Series without a doubt was full of plenty of drama.  From the New York Mets trek to the big dance via Houston, to Bill Buckner making himself a footnote in baseball history, 1986 is a hard one to forget.  Ron Darling on most other baseball pitching staffs would have easily been the Ace, but on the Mets he was in the shadows of one phenom, namely Dwight Gooden.  Nonetheless Darling was the arm on tap to pitch Game 7 of the 1986 World Series.  Most people forget that the Buckner error was in Game 6 which then led to needing to play a game 7.

Ron Darling has made a nice little post pitching career for himself being a baseball analyst for both the Mets and the MLB Network.  He has great natural insight into the game and always explains the nuances to the fans so that the get a full understanding of the issues at hand.  Darling takes the same approach in his new book.

He takes the reader through Game 7 inning by inning, explaining the thought process used in his pitches as well as what was going on around him.  You see how the pitcher Ron Darling was processing the events of the day, but he also shows how the person Ron Darling was interpreting it as well.  It gives a real good rendition of the players take on what happened in Game 7, from a person who was on an emotional see-saw the entire evening.

Darling also gives a little glimpse of his personal life as well as some takes on his New York teammates.  It is not an in-depth analysis of his fellow Mets but it certainly gives the reader a behind the scenes glimpse of the team.

The question still sticks in my mind, how do you remember this much vivid detail 30 years later?  Admittedly he used some video footage to “refresh” his memory, but I still find it hard to accept these types of books as 100% credible.  Time easily distorts things even with the aide of video tape.  It also seems to some degree Ron darling is apologizing for his pitching performance but does seem to take the attitude of “I am sure glad we won, even though I sucked”.

This book is an enjoyable and quick read.  It flows smoothly and if Ron Darling is remembering correctly, gives the reader some great detail into Game 7.  It was a World Series to remember and all baseball fans will enjoy reliving this one special game.

You can get this book from the nice folks at St. Martins Press

Game 7, 1986

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

Finley Ball-How Two Outsiders Changed the Game Forever


Some members of off field personnel throughout the history of the game have left an indelible mark.  Whether it was their contributions to the game, their foresight or just their personality, they are hard people to forget.  These same people receive one of two legacies from the game of baseball.  They get the type of treatment after they die that they gave to Bill Veeck.  They really didn’t approve of his efforts while a member of the baseball establishment, but after he died he became an innovator.  The baseball establishment also had another whipping boy during this same era.  A man who was years ahead of his time and whose ideas and strategies would leave a lasting impression on the game.  During his time as a member of the owners club, he was ridiculed and mocked by his peers and honestly the passage of time and his death have not done much to change his legacy.  The name Charlie Finley is one that almost all baseball fans are familiar with, and one that several books have been written about.  Now, there is a book that gives the reader an inside look at the genius that was Charlie, along with the help of his right hand man Carl, and how together they built the dynasty that was the Oakland A’s.

download (2)

By: Nancy Finley-2016

Nancy Finley gives the reader a unique perspective of the Finley operations.  She is the daughter of Carl and the niece of Charlie who essentially grew up around the A’s during the dynasty years.  She gives the reader a nice background on how Charlie obtained the team along with a great history of the team during the Kansas City years.  She shows how Finley was willing to invest in his team and stadium, out of his own pocket, and was always willing to put on a show for his fans.  Without being a spoiler, he really wanted to give back to the fans and promote his product and his innovations really left a lasting impression on the game of baseball.

Next up Nancy shows you how the move to Oakland really came to fruition.  That move and Charlie’s willingness to build a winner from within, finally allowed the team to win a few world championships and become a full fledged dynasty.  Finally you see the change in baseball that was the ultimate demise of the Finley empire in Oakland and what forced him to reluctantly sell the team.

What I find the most interesting aspect of the book is the inside details the author is able to give the reader.  She is able to give great details on the day to day operations with shoe string staffs and how her dad Carl, was the number one trusted employee of Charles Finley.  Through their combined efforts they were able to build a baseball empire the like of which may never be seen again in the history of baseball.

This book gives us a great inside look of both the baseball operations and the people involved with the A’s during this era.  It also to me, gives a more personal portrait of Charlie Finley that we have never seen before.  It portrays him in a much kinder light than others I have ever seen before, and I think that portrayal is much more credible since it is from someone with first hand knowledge of the family.

This book is a fun trip through the Finley era.  I recommend if you have any interest in this era of baseball, to give this one a look.  It sheds some new, inside information on the Finley dynasty and how two outsiders really changed the game, and also what really became of Charlie O., the A’s beloved mascot.

You can get this book from the nice folks at Regnery History

Finley Ball

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

 

Ken Boyer-All Star, MVP, Captain


It is a very sad fact that no matter how good a player is or was, they sometimes get forgotten in baseball history.  Flashier, louder and more savvy players come along and steal the spotlight while these great players just go about their business playing the game.  This also extends to other arenas like the Hall of Fame, because some players get forgotten by the voters in Cooperstown as well.  Baseball publishing is another area where so many of the stories that should be told, if for no other reason than preservation of the game’s history, usually are not.  Ken Boyer is one of those players that had an incredible career, but truly never got any of the written credit he deserved.  Boyer recently shared a book about himself and his siblings and a few books aimed at the juvenile set were published during his career, but up until now he has never gotten the book he really deserved.  Kevin McCann has published the book that baseball fans have been wanting and waiting for about Ken Boyer.

download (1)

By:Kevin D. McCann-2016

Ken Boyer was a staple of St. Louis Cardinals baseball for a long time.  Receiver of numerous accolades during his career, he was the type of baseball player parents were glad that their kids looked up to.  For some reason throughout time, Boyer never got the recognition he deserved form historians.  Perhaps it was his low key demeanor and how he went about his business or some other unknown reason, but it really is a shame the world has not recognized his talents.

Kevin McCann has produced a real gem with this book.  He takes a look at Boyer’s early life and how his early life struggles helped forge the strong personality that his was.  He also takes a look at Boyer’s climb up the baseball ladder.  Experiences in the Minor Leagues all added to the personality that eventually shone through in St. Louis.

McCann also takes the reader on a journey along with Ken Boyer through his impressive time manning Third Base for the Cardinals.  World Series triumphs, All-Star Games and an MVP award just to keep it interesting were all bestowed upon Boyer while manning the hot corner.  Next he takes you through the winding down portion of his career with stops with the Mets, White Sox and Dodgers.  But the journey doesn’t stop there with Boyer.  The author shows us the steps Boyer took to remain in baseball.  By starting at the bottom and working his way back up again, he was able to take over the managerial reigns of the Cardinals for a while with limited success before his untimely death in 1982.

Finally McCann makes a solid case for Boyer’s inclusion in the Baseball Hall of Fame. Honestly if you can make a solid case to have Ron Santo in the Hall  at this point then Ken Boyer is a no-brainer for induction.  For some reason baseball has overlooked Boyer’s career and has shown to some degree the flaws with the Hall of Fame voting system.

McCann has written a great book with this one.  The writing style flows smoothly, moves fast and makes the reader feel like they were actually there.  It is a great story that I for one am glad is finally being told on the level it deserves.  The book is very hard to put down once you get started.

Baseball fans should check this one regardless of team allegiance.  It is a player that should be given the historical respect he deserves and hopefully this book takes an important step forward in gaining recognition for the legacy Ken Boyer left behind.

You can get this book from the nice folks at BrayBree Publishing

Ken Boyer-All-Star, MVP, Captain

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

It Has to Start Somewhere!!!!!!


Baseball is a game full of firsts.  First pitch, first game, first out, first inning……the list is endless.  But for us baseball book geeks (a badge I wear with honor by the way), that list of firsts also includes our first baseball book.  For some people it starts in childhood when you get that first juvenile baseball book under your belt.  For others its in adulthood after you settle down and figure out who you are.  Then for the rest of us, its starts when you are 12 years old and stumble upon a book that you may not have been the target audience.

download

There has never been a shortage of biographies out there about Reggie Jackson.  This one from 1984  I hold in higher esteem than all the others, mostly because it was my first.  My first baseball book was a shear accident.  My Dad, who I owe most of my fan dedication and knowledge to, bought me this book.  From his Thursday night supermarket trip in 1985 he plucked it from the bargain bin at Pathmark and brought it home for me.  Thus sending me on a literary journey lasting over 30 years so far.

I always liked Reggie Jackson because he was somewhat of a local hero.  He grew up in the town five minutes away from the one I grew up in.  He went to the local high school and at that time was the one superstar who came from our own backyard.  So right off the bat the appeal was there about the book of our local guy made good.

Now this book has been out for over thirty years, is probably tame by today’s standards and more biographies about Reggie have come out in the subsequent decades.   But for me, after countless other books, this book is the one.  For all of my time on earth, this book about Reggie, this tattered copy especially, will hold a special place in my heart forever.  It is the book that made me realize how many cool baseball books were out there. I may not have been the target audience of this book, but it did open my eyes to what baseball was really like.   This book led me to baseball classics, such as Dynasty and Bums by Peter Golenbock.  To books about Cobb, Ruth, Gehrig, Mantle, Musial, Maris, DiMaggio and hundreds of others. Taking me to places in my own head, which for some was the only way imaginable to get there, allowing me to learn about the people and places that made baseball great.

I realize a lot of people say Ball Four was the book that brought them into the baseball world, and that it is the epitome of the baseball book.  For my money I will stick with my copy of Reggie.  Everybody has that one special baseball book they love for whatever reason they so chose.  For me its not that popular tell-all baseball book by Jim Bouton that everyone loves to some degree.  It is yet another tired rendition of how great Reggie Jackson was or is, depending on how you look at it and there is no other book out there I am willing to give it up for.

So take some time and pull out that old copy of the book that started it all for you.  Spend some time with that old worn out friend and re-live what made baseball books so appealing to you, because you will never forget your first.

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

 

 

Bobo Newsom-Baseball’s Traveling Man


I will admit it, 2016 has been off to a somewhat slow start for me with baseball books.  The books from publishers and authors have slowed down somewhat, so I just don’t have as many books to post as of late.  One book that I am glad to say I still had in my arsenal was this one.

51cLukeQH-L._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_

By:Jim McConnell – 2016

Every generation of baseball seems to have that one character that stands out above the others.  Not necessarily for their skills on the field, but more for the character they are off of it.  One of those larger than life characters was Bobo Newsom.  Coming from very humble beginnings in South Carolina, he turned his baseball skills into his own little circus.  Making stops in various cities around the league, some of those actually more than once or twice, he made the best of situations and created himself, the legend of Bobo.

Bobo is definitely an under-covered personality of the game.  Perhaps it is because he passed away more than 50 years ago or perhaps the powers that be within the game want us to forget about him altogether.  Whatever the reasons may be, it is important that we remember these types of people because these dedicated folks are what the game is built on.  Guys like Bobo and Boots Poffenberger need to be remembered for their contributions to the game and not lost to the passage of time.

Jim McConnell has done an awesome job of bringing Ol’ Bobo back to life.  For generations that may have missed him, this book takes you back to the time when Bobo reigned over baseball, to the delight of many and maybe not so much to others.  His career and personal life are both covered in this book and it paints a complete picture of someone we honestly don’t get to read that much about.  I had trouble putting this one down because he played in so many decades that he kept crossing paths with some of the games greats and it kept the story moving along at a brisk pace.  His larger than life personality also made it a very interesting book and kept the reader involved the entire time.

Baseball fans should pick this one up, because it will appeal to fans of the game.  If you are a  fan of a specific teams, there is a pretty good shot Bobo played for your team at one time or another way back when, so it should have some appeal there as well.  In all honesty, there is a great story in this book about one of the games most interesting personalities.  This book is a great tool to teach the future generations of fans about the legend of Bobo Newsom.

You can get this book from the nice folks at McFarland

Bobo Newsom-Baseball’s Traveling Man

Happy Reading

Gregg