Category: Dodgers

Who Gets a Book-Part II


I asked this question on another post recently and received a litany of great answers.  I am well aware that there really is no criteria to who gets a book, but each of us has their own criteria of what really merits a book.  I for one am not here to pass along my thoughts on the subject because each of us has different views and it becomes a personal choice more than anything else.  I found two books recently that come from two ends of the spectrum on the field, but give the reader a very similar product in the end.

Ralph Mauriello and Ron Fairly have several things in common.  Most notably they are both Dodgers Alumni, and I have noticed the feeling of once a Dodger, always a Dodger.  But their careers took very different paths throughout the years.  While Mauriello had a short stint with the Major League team, he spent the majority of his playing years toiling in the minors, while Fairly put a couple of decades at the big league level with a few different stops around the league.  Now with such different playing careers and reaching different levels of success you would thing the end resulting books of their lives would be wildly different.  I am glad to say that could not be further from the truth.

Now that is not to say that both books are mirror images, but there are certain important qualities that shine through.  They both share their life and career experiences for the reader which helps give a well-rounded view of what they offered on the field.  This comes in especially helpful those readers that may not have been around during their playing days, it paints a picture in your mind of what baseball was like for each author as they made their way along their unique journey.  Both books also illustrate what great men both players were, the humility they had, both on and off the field and the honor it was for both of them to be part of the game they loved.  Family is also an important factor in both men’s lives and it is showcased very clearly in both books.  Finally, both books show what life is like after you are off the field.  While both men have taken very different paths in life you can see the underlying love of the game and the immense pride they both had to be on that field.

When I asked the who deserves a book question previously I thought I had a better handle on the answer .  Today I realize if you have a story to tell, no matter what their contribution to the game was, it’s a story worth telling.  It’s up to the readers to decide which stories that they want to read and what they find worthy of their time.  If it is a 20 year veteran or a cup of coffe player, they still have a lot to offer the readers.   For my money these both books make the cut.

If you like the Dodgers and the early years of California baseball, along with a spattering of stories about celebrities and baseball royalty then these books would be for you.  They both tell great stories throughout flow very nicely and you get two different views of the Once a Dodger Always a Dodger tag.

You can get these great books at the following links:

Ralph Mauriello

Ron Fairly

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

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Spring has Sprung !!!!


Well, it’s that time of year again.  Opportunity abounds for all, the realization of a life long dream may be in the offing and as it is always said, hope springs eternal.  The new baseball season offers hope to every baseball fan that this is finally going to be their year and their hopes of a championship will be realized.  For those involved in the game, players are hoping to get their big break while others are hoping to hang one for just one more year.  If you take a good hard look at a baseball team, all of these hopes and dreams of just about everyone lay in the hands of just one person, the General Manager.  A position of amazing power, it is also one of great sacrifice and fortitude to attain it and one that comes with some unfair criticism at times.  Today’s book takes a look at arguably one of the modern eras greatest GM’s and what it took to reach the pinnacle.

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Ned Colletti can easily be described as a baseball lifer.  Landing stints for the Cubs, Giants and finally the Dodgers, he got to contribute to three of the most storied franchises in the history of the game.  Now his new book shows what it took to reach his goals as both a person and a professional General Manager.

Ned walks us through his childhood and its a compelling story about an average American kid.  Next he shows us how barely making ends meet he gets his job with the Chicago Cubs and his professional journey truly begins.  It shows the reader how with great sacrifice and perseverance great things can be accomplished.  Next we stop with Colletti in San Francisco and see how the building blocks of a transformation were laid.  Finally we travel to the Dodgers and see what its like dealing with a meddling mess of an owner while trying to build a contender.  His professional story is a fascinating one and his accolades well-earned, but its his personal story that also resonates throughout this book.

You get to see the personal side of a highly respected General Manager and quite honestly we don’t always see that in these books.  His anecdotes may be about baseball, but you get a good feel of his personality when he is telling these stories.  I enjoy books like this that I walk away getting the sense that the subject seems like a pretty decent guy in real life.  The Baseball books afford us to get closer details and some inside information about events that take place, but not always closer to the people involved.

If you have an interest in getting to know a real guy and the inner workings of the front office then this is a book you should check out.  It will be time well spent to get a new perspective on the inner workings of the game and a glimpse at someone who comes off as a pretty decent guy as well.

You can get this book from the nice folks at G.P. Putnum & Sons

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

Last Minute Christmas Ideas for us Baseball Book Lovers


It’s that time of year again.  The malls are packed,  packages are getting wrapped, the credit cards are melting and for us procrastinators, the last-minute shopping rush is on.  If you are shopping for a Baseball book lover you may have a hard time deciding what to get that special someone.  Don’t fear because I have a few last minute ideas for you.

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Up first is the new book released this year by Greg Lucas, and quite honestly it could not have come at a more opportune time.  With winning the World Series this year, anything about the Astros is a hot commodity.  They have a rich and storied history and while it may be shorter than some of the other teams, they have still had some big names come through the Lone Star state.

Houston to Cooperstown takes a look at the overall history of the franchise.  From its inception in 1962, Lucas walks you through the history of the upstart franchise, through its time in the Astrodome, finally reaching some success on the field and highlighting it with its two newest members in Cooperstown, Biggio and Bagwell.  Next Lucas shows how the team moved to its next stage of existence, getting to their new ballpark, reaching the World Series for the first time and the epic rebuild that helped them win the World Series this year.

For the die-hard Astros fan this is a book that they can’t miss.  It is both comprehensive and enjoyable.  It flows smoothly and keeps the reader wanting more.  They get to re-live some of the great and really not so great times in the team’s history and can honestly feel like they were there, even if some of the stories were before their time.  This book is a really nice way to finish up a World Championship year for the fans of Houston.

Next up…….

I have said this before about books like these, they scare me.  The subject is very subjective and quite honestly no two will have the same set of standards as to what makes a player great.  For example, my favorite player of all-time is Phillies Outfielder from the 70’s Greg Luzinski.  Hardly a household name, but he easily makes my top five Phils, so you see what can happen with these books.

Looking at these two releases I can honestly say there was some serious thought put into the selection of the players chosen to be included.  I usually agree to the selections in these types of books at about of rate of 50%, which I feel is a pretty good rate, but both of these books came in at close to 80% agreement.  I honestly think that I have an average fan outlook and historical evaluation criteria for the most part, so I think that agreement percentage is a great achievement.

Cohen paints vivid pictures of some storied careers that were parts of these historical franchises.  It gives some one on one perspectives of some of the games greats of all time.  These type of books also offer an education element to them because you learn about some names you may never have heard of before.

Fans of either of these teams will obviously want to check these out and see if they agree with Robert Cohen’s pics as well.  These are also valuable to fans that fancy themselves as amateur historians of the game, because you can get some good information on some of the featured players.

You can get any of these books from the nice folks at Blue River Press

Finally, I apologize to all my loyal followers (yes all three of you), with our new addition to the family last year, time is at a premium and unfortunately baseball books have fell victim to my time crunch.  Aubrey does not give me much spare time to read and post, but I will try my darndest to post more in 2018.  I will not after almost 400 posts let this become a zombie blog.

Happy Holidays to all and a safe and healthy New Year to each and every one of you.

Happy Reading

Gregg

Leo Durocher-Baseball’s Prodigal Son


I am sure no one has missed me on here, but I should probably give a brief explanation of my MIA status.  Between a new job, moving back to Philadelphia and figuring out this whole Fatherhood thing, baseball books have become the victim of circumstances.  Now that we are settled in our new place and the very large former Ron Kaplan book collection has been moved, I can hopefully focus on some more books, but if anyone has any ideas how to get an eight month old to sleep through the night, I would love to hear from you.  I figured I would start back with a book that was highly anticipated by myself and did not disappoint.

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By Paul Dickson-2017

I was familiar with Dickson’s previous work on his Bill Veeck book and really enjoyed that one, so I expected more of the same with this.  Leo Durocher was one of those figures in baseball history that was either loved or hated, somewhere in the middle was not an option.  To date, there have been a few books about Durocher, but none recently so it was a subject worth revisiting.

Paul Dickson takes a hard look at both Durocher’s playing and managing career.  Not really much of a player numbers-wise, he had the small guy attitude that was appreciated by many a manager.  This book looks at his trouble with Babe Ruth and the hard-nosed play that forged his cocky reputation.   It is very thorough look at an often overlooked part of Leo’s resume.

Durocher’s real strength was his managing obviously.  With varying degrees of success at all of his stops in the big leagues, you see how his hard-nosed playing attitude spills over into his managing.  The reader also sees how Leo becomes the victim of a changing game.  How more success early in his career does not carry over in the latter years.  The game changed along with player attitudes, but old Leo stuck to his guns.  It translated into some rough times for the long time manager, but those stops still put the finishing touches on an impressive career.

The one aspect of this book I found most interesting was the details of his private life.  From associations with known gamblers, to his friendships with the Hollywood types, it leads to a very interesting life.  Of course, the four wives add some zing to that private life also.  It is an interesting aspect of Leo that we know some details about, but this sheds a whole new light on the subject.

Overall, this book is tirelessly researched and prepared well.  It gets a little stat heavy at times, but the overall content of the book makes up for that lone aspect I did not like.  If you have any interest in Durocher, or are a fan of this era of the game, check this one out.  At 300+ pages it is a lot of reading but is for sure, time well spent.

Check it out, I don’t think anyone will be disappointed.

Happy Reading

Gregg

Two Very Similar Books That Leave Two Very Different Impressions


Most things in life are at the perspective of the person doing it.  Baseball offers many things that could be relative to the person witnessing the action, and you could have 100 people and get 100 different perspectives.  Today’s books offer essentially the same type of biography but the readers give two totally different outcomes from their authors.

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By:Richard Elliott-2016

Richard Elliott offers his biography of Clem Labine from a personal perspective.  Theirs was essentially a life long friendship that grew from hero worship as a child when Clem was still an active player, to a relationship as a trusted colleague when Clem was an instrumental member of the author’s family business.  It is an interesting transition between player and fan and adds a unique twist to the story.  It is not often you come across a story like this where the former player becomes almost a member of the family.

This book is very sentimental and has every right to be.  It is stories about the many interactions between player and young fan and how they formed an unlikely friendship. The book also allows the reader to see the fondness Elliott has for Labine still to this day, and the emotion of the author comes through strongly.  If you are looking for an in-depth bio on Labine’s career, then this one comes in a little light, but in all truth it is an enjoyable story on a personal level that really carries its own weight and worth the read.

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By:Tom Molito-2016

The next book also attempts to do the same.  Tom Molito was a die hard Mickey Mantle fan growing up and as he aged his business dealings allowed him to get close to Mantle on a personal level.  This one has the same hero adulation that the Clem Labine book does, but it also is from the perspective of a businessman.  It shows the struggle between childhood memories and hero worship, and the dark realities of an alcoholic and former hero you are trying to work with.

It gives a very interesting look into the life of Mickey Mantle during his final years and the daily struggles Mickey had with his own demons and those that his handlers had in up keeping his public persona.  The author has done a great job of being honest with the struggles he had dealing with the childhood memories and the stark truth that stared him in the face.  Fortunately for the author, there was some good memories that came from his dealings with The Mick, so all was not lost.

Both of these books offer good things for the reader.  Labine’s book I believe was intended to be just what it was, a tribute to a dear friend and since Labine’s death  it may have been a way to write the final chapter on their friendship.  The Mickey Mantle book on the other hand offers a direct look at the bleak reality of what Mickey Mantle really was near the end of his life.  I don’t think it was in any way intended to be a smear book and the authors tone throughout the book solidifies my opinion on that.   It is just one book had an easier subject to work with than the other.

Check out both books, because they are both short easy reads and give unique perspectives on both subjects.  Labine is a hard subject to find books on and this is one of the few I have found available.  Also, when was the last time you read a new and different story about Mickey Mantle, for most of us I bet it has been awhile.

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

 

Handsome Ransom Jasckson-Accidental Big Leaguer


Some baseball books have a real knack for portraying the true feelings of their authors.  These types of books allow the reader to get a good feel of what their personality is like and at what level they appreciated their talents.  I have noticed and with good reason, the brighter the star, the less appreciation for the talent.  Now there are some Superstars that do not fall into that generalization, but through the years I have read enough baseball books to back it up.  I always find it enjoyable when a lesser known star publishes a book and their appreciation for the game and their experiences overflow from the pages.  Today’s book qualifies for that category and allows the reader to hear some new stories along the way.

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By:Ransom Jackson-2016

When sure fire Hall of Famers come up in conversation, Ransom Jackson is not in the mix.  The owner of some respectable career numbers, he would never been confused with stars such as Mantle or Mays.  Making stops in several Major League cities, Jackson has compiled some incredible stories that have lasted him a lifetime and now is sharing with the world.

Ransom starts with the telling about his childhood and his upbringing in a totally different period in American culture.  It gives a nice glimpse of all the changes that have happened in our country over the last century.  He also shows his readers the struggles he faced in making it to professional baseball and the sacrifices he and those around him made to get him there.

Next Ransom dazzles the readers with some great stories from his various stops around the league.  Being part of that great era in baseball, he was able to rub elbows with some of the games great names from a few different eras.  Shining through in all of this is the fact that Ransom is very appreciative of the experiences he has had.  He realizes how lucky and blessed he really was to do what he did for so many years.  Finally the book wraps up nicely in showing the reader Ransom’s life after baseball.

I always enjoy books of the lesser known players.  As stated above, their appreciation of their experiences and accomplishments in the game are much stronger and better explained through the pages of their books.  I also do not use the term lesser known player as any sort of insult.  There are so many of us that would be proud and thrilled to have one days worth of these lesser known players careers.

If you are not familiar with Ransom Jackson take the time to read this book, it is a great glimpse of what you can accomplish if you put in the effort and a good look at what baseball was like 60 years ago.  If you are one of the lucky ones who are familiar with Jackson’s career, you will not be disappointed, his stories are vivid and very entertaining.

You can get this book from the nice  folks at Rowman & Littlefield

Accidental Big Leaguer

Happy Reading

Gregg

Dodgerland-Decadent L.A. and the 77-78 Dodgers


Growing up as a Phillies fan in the late 70’s was full of heartbreak, and most of it was at the hands of the Los Angeles Dodgers.  My very first game that I went to at the ripe old age of five was the NLCS at Veterans Stadium against those same hated Dodgers.  That very game helped prepare me for a lifetime of mostly heartbreak brought to me by my beloved Phillies.  Today’s book takes a look at two of the Dodgers powerhouse teams from that era and in particular the 77 and 78 versions that really stuck it to my Phillies.

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By:Michael Fallon-2016

Both of these Dodgers teams contained a plethora of homegrown stars.  Ron Cey, Bill Russell, Steve Garvey, Davey Lopes are just a few of the players who came up through the Dodger farm system playing for their now Major League manager Tommy Lasorda.  It helped foster the environment that the Dodgers always outwardly portrayed, that of being one great big happy family.  It created unity and allowed them to play at a level on the field that was matched by very few teams in the league.  Its surprising that it took them until 1981 to finally win a World Championship.

Michael Fallon has written this book in an attempt to showcase the teams of 77-78.  It is a time where the Big Red Machine was on the decline in the N.L. West and the division was ripe for the Dodgers to pick it.  All of their homegrown studs were in their prime and all the stars were aligning for them to become a reigning powerhouse.  It was a great time to be a Dodger fan and embrace the changing of the guard between Alston and Lasorda, and learn the new fast paced ways of the late 70’s

Fallon does tell a good story within these pages and does a nice job relating these facts to the readers.  If you were not around in Los Angeles during these years you get a feel of what the vibe was like there.  In a time before the internet and instant gratification that we exist in now, it is a good throwback to remember the different ways of our world.  It also gives a glimpse of how old school baseball was still alive and well in the game during the late 70’s

The downside of this book for me was being from the other side of the continent I had trouble finding a reason to care about the social activities and politics of Los Angeles.  It was a lot of names that someone outside of California would be able to recognize or even care about, but for local readers it still gave a vision of life outside of baseball in L.A.  My other gripe about this book is that the author at times puts an autobiographical spin on it.  Stories about Dad’s hardware store and things like that really just felt out of place with what it seemed the book was trying to accomplish.  It almost seemed as if the book had a split personality and the two of them did not work well together.  My final gripe is that there were some minor baseball factual errors.  This seems to be a recurring problem in baseball books and I wish the publishers would hire a freelancer or someone like that just to fact check some of these things.  But that really is more of a pet peeve I guess.

Overall its a good baseball book, just be prepared for it to veer off in other directions every so often.  If you can live with that aspect of the book, and you have an interest in the Los Angeles Dodgers, then you will enjoy this book.

You can get this book from the nice folks at University of Nebraska Press

Dodgerland

Happy Reading

Gregg