Category: Brewers

Bring In the Right-Hander!


Sometimes I find a baseball autobiography and wonder if this player really needed their own book.  If that player had an average, or even less than average career, what could they possibly bring to the table?  Sometimes I get a pleasant surprise when one of those average player writes a book that holds my interest and produces a good reading experience for me.  Today’s book falls into that pleasant surprise category and from an unlikely source to boot.

Reuss-Book-University-of-Nebraska-Press

By:Jerry Reuss-2014

Jerry Reuss by most standards had an average career.  Never the ace of a staff, but a serviceable arm that would eat innings and help teams in their push to the top.  Pitching for eight teams over a 22 year span, Reuss compiled an impressive win total of 220.  From a pitcher that never won more than 18 games in any given season,  that is an impressive total.

Jerry Reuss starts the reader on a journey through his early years in Missouri, where he first dreamed of becoming a major league pitcher.  Signing with the hometown St. Louis Cardinals, Reuss had all the makings of  a real life dream come true.

Reuss then shows the reader what the inside, off the field life of a baseball player is really like.  Back stabbings by the upper management people he trusted, trades, releases and other not so pleasant things a player deals with on an annual basis.  It shows how much more players even back in those days had to deal with off the field.

The big thing I took away from this book is how remaining true to yourself and dealing fair with people will help you get ahead at whatever your vocation.  Jerry Reuss played more years than many of his contemporaries did who maintained the same skill set.  It comes across as being a combination of perseverance at his chosen trade and being a decent person on and off the field.  In the end this average pitcher ended his career, after a few stops in different cities, the proud owner of a World Series ring.

This book is a pretty enjoyable read.  It moves along at a brisk pace and holds the readers interest through more than just on the field happenings.  Anecdotes about himself and teammates keep you engaged and give you a real feel what it was like to be a teammate of Reuss’.  It also shows a glimpse of the personality of Reuss himself which comes across as a fun loving guy and a great teammate.

If you are a fan of Reuss or any of the teams he played for, take the time to read this book.  It is not a book that one would compare to War & Peace in any way.  It is more of a breezy light hearted read of an average pitcher with an interesting journey.  I wasn’t expecting much out of Reuss’  stories about his career and his teammates, but was pleasantly surprised at what I got.  You never know who or what is going to present you with an enjoyable book.

You can get this book from the nice folks at the University of Nebraska Press

Bring In the Right-Hander!

Happy Reading

Gregg

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Becoming Big League-Seattle, the Pilots and Stadium Politics


If there is one thing I have learned in the new stadium craze over the last 25 years, it is that baseball and politics do not always mix.  The involved parties are usually at opposite ends of the spectrum as to what is warranted and who should pay for what.  The same problems arise, weather it is replacing an existing stadium or creating an expansion franchise.  It all comes down to how the details are handled as to what success comes from all the hard work.  Today’s book takes a look at all the struggles one city went through to get a team but still wound up on the losing end of the deal.

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By Bill Mullins-2013

Becoming Big League takes a look at the city of Seattle and their efforts to land a Major League franchise in the 1960’s.  It shows how some infighting and disagreements over the future of the city led to delays and confusion.  It also shows how the local ownership group of the Seattle Pilots were flying by the seat of their pants in all aspects of the business.

From the feel the book gives you their was a group of people, along with the powers at Major League Baseball who really wanted to see the Pilots come to Seattle and succeed. They felt it was a great location that would help baseball thrive in the northwest area of the country and be a nice accent to the teams already placed in California. In theory the Pilots were a great idea, they just met too many off the field problems to thrive.

Local government infighting along with stadium construction issues and owners who financially flew by the seat of their pants while conducting business all doomed the Pilots in Seattle.  Even almost a decade after the Pilots were gone and the Mariners arrived for round two of baseball in Seattle, many of the same problems still existed.  The only plus side at that point was that Seattle had at least learned the minimum required of them to keep their baseball franchise.  More recently Seattle has had the same problems luring the NBA to Seattle almost 50 years later.

Bill Mullins has created a great two part book.  One is the baseball study that chronicles baseball coming to the Northwest.  From the inception of the Pilots and agreements with Major League Baseball, to the moving of the franchise to Milwaukee and the birth of the Brewers.  Secondly this book is a great urban study of local politics.  Seattle wanted to keep its small time charm and quaintness, but still attract big money players.  It shows how Seattle citizenship was split down the middle as to which path they wanted their city to follow.

If you have an interest in the Seattle Pilots their is lots of great information in here about the team and their short operations.  There are some things i here that you don’t always easily come across when researching the Pilots.  If you have an interest in local politics and how Seattle of the past functioned, you should give this book a look as well.  It shows how some cities have trouble growing when they need to.

You can get this book from the nice folks at the University of Washington Press

Becoming Big League

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

 

Change Up-How to Make the Great Game of Baseball Even Better


No matter who you are, if you are a baseball fan, you have opinions on how to make the game better.  It could be ways to speed up the game, a way to play the game more effectively or even personnel decisions that would alter the complexion of your team. Regardless of what your ideas are, more than likely they will fall on deaf ears.  Now if you are a baseball lifer like today’s author, you automatically gain some credence to your ideas just because of the experience and respect you have attained during your career.

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By Buck Martinez-2016

 

Buck Martinez has been a solid baseball lifer.  Spending a career as an on field back up Catcher, he had the opportunity to study the game during his three team stop in the major leagues.  His final stop in Toronto seemed to provide him the best education and allow him to find as permanent a home as one can find in baseball.  His post retirement career as both field manager and television analyst have continued his baseball education and allowed him to become one of the most respected minds in baseball.

This book has almost a Frankenstein feel to it.  It really could have been several different stand alone books all by the same author, but here it is rolled all in to one product.  The first part of the book that Buck gives the reader, is his childhood and playing career.  You see his love of the game from his youth and how he worked himself hard to become a major leaguer.  He was for most of his time in the major leagues a back up or fringe player which allowed him to study the game.  All three teams, The Royals, Brewers and Blue Jays, were all fairly bad teams that were attempting to build a quality product on the field and Buck was part of the construction of all three.  It was those three stops that Buck learned what it took to be a winner and how to build success.

After his playing days were over Buck found a home as an analyst for the Blue Jays and has made himself a vital part of the Jays TV crew and a respected voice from the booth.  His analyst career was interrupted by a brief and not so successful stint as Blue Jays manager.  It was a wrong place, wrong time career move, that if it was under a different set of circumstances, may have turned out much different.

The third part of this book conglomeration is Buck’s opinions of what works and does not work within today’s game.  He cites examples of who he thinks is playing and respecting the game at the correct level.  He also presents some ideas that he thinks would improve the game.  He has some decent ideas that someone within the game and the powers that be, may want to stop and take a look at.  They are not way out ideas and would help enhance the game as we know it today.

When you think of Buck Martinez you don’t think of a Hall of Fame player.  While he had an average career, he has made himself a spectacular student of the game and makes educated and well thought out suggestions to improve the game.  If you are looking for an educated view of the current game this may be a book you would want to check out.  He presents his ideas in ways that would improve the game without disrupting its natural flow.  The book showed a whole new side of Buck Martinez to me and allowed me to gain a whole new respect for him.

You can get this book from the nice folks at HarperCollins

Change Up

Happy Reading

Gregg

Toy Cannon – The Autobiography of Baseball’s Jimmy Wynn


There are teams out there that have through their history had iconic players.  When you think of the Yankees, Ruth, Gehrig, DiMaggio and Mantle always pop to mind.  For the Red Sox, Ted Williams is the man.  What if you are a team that does not have a century long history in the game and has had limited success on the field.  The Tampa Rays come to mind with having no one that has been a stand out player and really have had limited success.  The Astros and the Mets both entered the league together and have taken different paths.  The journey of the  Mets has generated a bunch of post-season births, coupled with a few World Series championships and a roster of iconic players.  The Astros on the other hand have had limited success and a handful of post season appearances. With their past performance it is surprising how many great players the Houston Astros have had during their time in the league.  One name that immediately pops to mind is the iconic Jimmy Wynn.  Essentially being there from the beginning when they were still the Colt 45’s, Wynn’s performance on the field and his down to earth nature easily made him a force to be reckoned with on the field and a fan favorite off of it. While today’s book is not a new release, I wanted to share it because it really is an enjoyable tale.

 

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By: Jimmy Wynn-2010

In today’s terms Jimmy Wynn was a stud.  Being the player on the top of the Houston power heap, Wynn was able to give the Astros someone to build a team around during their formative years in the league.  Unfortunately for both parties they were never able to reach the ultimate goal of a visit to the World Series during their time together.

This is not like reading a regular book, it is more like sitting on the porch with your friend and listening to his stories.  Wynn walks the reader through his childhood in Cincinnati and his dreams of one day being a big league baseball player.  You get a nice look at the Wynn family values and how those ideals helped produce a fine person in Jimmy Wynn.  Next you see the minor league struggles that brought Wynn from the hometown Reds farm system to the fields of Houston.

A good portion of this book is rightly so about his time with the Astros.  He his most widely known for his accomplishments on the field there and where he spent the biggest bulk of his career, so it is only natural it takes up so much space in the book.  Jimmy tells the reader about events both on and off the field that have helped him both learn and grow as a person, as well as the mistakes he has made along the way that effected his life. Finally the book takes us through stops with the Dodgers, Braves, Yankees and Brewers.  It is a career well traveled and a lot of accomplishments that any player would be proud of.

The most surprising thing is that Jimmy Wynn admits his flaws and his mistakes he has made over the years.  Most baseball players would not take the time to admit these things at all, let alone do it in their autobiography.  It really shows the depth of character he has and what a genuine person he really is.

The book is a great read for all baseball fans.  It shows the real side of a baseball star and how they are human just like the rest of us and have their own faults.  It also shows how a player of this caliber can admit his faults and shows there is no shame in asking forgiveness from those you have wronged.  Check it out, I don’t think you will be disappointed..

You can get this book from the nice folks at McFarland

Toy Cannon-Jimmy Wynn

Happy Reading

Gregg

Long Taters-A Biography of George Scott


It’s funny how a baseball book can scratch the surface but never quite get all the way through.  With biographies that seems to be especially true.  For reasons unknown, perhaps shame, emotional reasons, or whatever some guys just never will give up the whole story.  As writers and interviewees they have every right to do so, but in the end, it always leaves questions in the reader’s mind.  Baseball players play an intricate part in the fans life. You spend 8 plus months following a player each year.  Stats, stories, news and dramatic plays all find their way into our daily lives.  So its only natural to want to know as much about your favorite players as possible.  Unfortunately even after they publish a book you may not get all your answers.  For me today’s book left me with some unanswered questions.

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By:Ron Anderson-McFarland 2012

I have always felt the George Scott was underrated. Possibly because of some of the teams he played on and being overshadowed by his own teammates. Maybe it was the fact he had the same type of relationship with the media that Dick Allen had, and that effected his popularity.  Regardless of the reason I never felt Boomer got his due.   Due to that fact, you never really felt you knew or understood George Scott as well as some of the other players on the team.  Ron Anderson has finally given the world a book that helps people understand and appreciate George Scott.  The author did some serious homework with this book.  Compiling interviews with Scott himself and countless friends, family and even some enemies, he has been able to portray a side of the man we never saw on the field.

From Scott’s beyond poor upbringing in segregated and violent Mississippi, his struggles to reach the major leagues and make it with the Boston Red Sox, you see a portrait of what made the man.  Events that helped guide his life and molded his personality.  You see daily struggles that he had to over come just because of the color of his skin and how those struggles effected him all of his days.  You also see confrontations that were a result of all of these issues.

When you think of great sluggers, George Scott does not jump into a lot of people’s minds.  He did have a very solid 14 year career and put up some pretty healthy numbers.  This book does give some insight into the man, his career and events that unfolded before and during baseball that both helped and hurt him.  The only part I would have liked to see is more about his life after baseball, off-seasons and more on a personal level.  It did not lack in giving George the credit he deserved in any way.  He finally got his due, it just felt like some part of the complete story of Boomer’s life may have been omitted.  Perhaps by accident or by design,  but in the end I still felt a little void.

Baseball fans of all teams will enjoy this one.  You get a chance to relive a career that most times gets forgotten.

You can get this book from the nice folks at McFarland Publishing

http://www.mcfarlandpub.com

Happy Reading

Gregg