In Ty Cobb’s Shadow

I find it fascinating that within the history of baseball there are still forgotten Superstars.  We have left no stone unturned in the documentation of the game, yet there are still players that do not get the respect or recognition they deserve.  Napoleon Lajoie is one of those players that falls into this group.  Yes he has gotten his plaque in Cooperstown and no one can take away his monster career numbers, but to me he always seems like an afterthought.  Perhaps timing comes into play here, being a part of the same generation as some of the games premier immortals, forcing him out of the spotlight.  Today’s book acknowledges his undeserved existence living in the shadows of the game’s bigger stars.


By Greg Rubano-2016

In all honesty, I know of Napoleon Lajoie and his great contributions to the game, but I am not very well read on him.  I thought that was somewhat odd for a Hall of Famer, but after a little research I now know that there are not that many Lajoie bios’s on the market.  So I was hoping with this book to learn a little bit more in depth about both the man and the player.  I got some of what I wanted, but not all of it.

This book is not a beginning to end Napoleon Lajoie biography as it is billed.  It is a series of anecdotes, poems, photos and other assorted bits that give the reader a very good feel for what baseball was like during this period.  Now it also dedicated a good portion of the book to Napoleon Lajoie and his storied career as one would expect.  How he was loved by his fans and how he lived his years after baseball.  The final chapter of this book shares a conversation between Ty Cobb and Napoleon Lajoie on a warm Florida afternoon a few years before their respective deaths, which I found very interesting.  It gave a brief glimpse of the immense pride of these two greats of the game.

The down side of this book for me was that this book was not a full Lajoie biography.  It was an opportunity missed for new generations to learn in depth about an oft forgotten Hall of Fame career.  My other pet peeve with this book was misspelled words and overall poor editing.  Just a pet peeve that arises from time to time for me as an avid reader.

So in the end something is better than nothing at all.  It didn’t give me enough of the Lajoie information that I was hoping for, but fans of this period should still enjoy it. Hopefully Lajoie is not one of those early superstars of the game who eventually fades into oblivion, as generations go by.

You can get this book from the nice folks at Stillwater River Publications

In Ty Cobb’s Shadow

Happy Reading


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