Baseball’s Power Shift-How the Players Union, the Fans and the Media Changed America’s Sports Culture


This time of year with Spring Training in full swing, it reminds us of all the exciting possibilities this upcoming year has to offer.  Everyone is looking forward to all the games and highlights in the near future, but the business end of baseball is the furthest thing from most fans minds.  Truth be told, somewhere, someone is attending to the business end of the game and always has.  Most fans don’t think about the contract negotiations that take place, the players working conditions that the union fights for or the meal money stipend the players get.  These are all the realities of the game and have been for decades.  It may be hard to comprehend for the average fan why these are important and further more how they arrived at where they stand today, but today’s book takes the time to explain what has transpired throughout the history of the game in regards to working conditions.

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By: Krister Swanson-2016

Krister Swanson has created a really interesting book.  It starts from the very early years of the game and shows what relations were like between the owners and players.  It was more of a parental relationship versus a business one.  It shows how the owners were able to realize what an advantages they had in the reserve clause and how to  use it to their own benefit.  The author shows how owners were able to maintain low salaries and reap all the rewards without having to share almost anything with their players.

Swanson also shows that the players started to realize how they were being exploited by the owners and attempted to improve conditions both on the field and monetarily.  The few feeble attempts at first which finally led to the formation of the MLBPA are chronicled in these pages.  I don’t think the owners or the establishment of the game itself had any idea what the possibilities were for the newly formed union.  It shows the union’s rise to power, how the media helped that and the fans sympathy that would help them along their journey.  The book also covers the few short strikes and lockouts along the way that occurred, just to keep things interesting.

The problem I had with the book is it seemed to stop the history lesson after the 1981 players strike.  I know as a fan, there were other strikes that occurred after 1981 and they were very influential on the shape of the game we now know.  Obviously there are other books out there that cover these strikes, but I think for complete coverage of the topic it should have been included in some shape or form in this book.  The only other problem I had was it said that Bob Feller played his entire career for the Braves.  I mean for me that is a huge error that should have been caught by someone.

Overall this is a very entertaining book.  It gives a great and thorough history lesson that even the most die hard baseball fan will be able to gain some knowledge from, plus the early years of labor relations within the game are not always widely covered.

You can get this book from the nice folks at the University of Nebraska Press

Power Shift

Happy Reading

Gregg

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