Hard-Luck Harvey Haddix and the Greatest Game Ever Lost


When you look back over the history of the game of baseball, there are certain things that may never happen again.  The game changes with every generation and certain things will just never be allowed to happen again.  I don’t think anyone will break Cal Ripken Jr’s consecutive game streak.  I know no pitcher will ever win 30 games again, mostly due to the five man rotation and of course Harvey Haddix’s 12 inning Perfect Game will never be topped either.  The feat itself as it stands is next to impossible, and the way pitchers are used today, none starter will ever get to the 12th inning in a game.  Today’s book takes a great look at why that game was so special.

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By:Lew Freedman – 2009

I have said it before when doing other books that  I really like Lew Freedman’s work.  I have read several in the past and really enjoyed them, so that is one of the reasons why I chose to take a look at this one.  One of the other reasons is I always liked Harvey Haddix.  He was a durable pitcher that quietly went about his business without much fanfare.  He reminds me a lot of Bobby Shantz in the fact that they just went about their routine and you almost forgot they were on the team until they entered a game.

Freedman’s book walks the reader through this 12 inning masterpiece inning by inning.  It is a back and forth format between each inning and the team itself.  You get game details and some stories about his teammates, but more importantly it fills in a lot of the blanks about this game.

Played on a day that rain was a threat all day in Milwaukee, in an era where not every game was televised, there are a few questions about the details of this game that I always had.  Unless you had a radio recording of this you were out of luck.  Haddix was under the weather all day and through shear inner strength he pulled it together and pitched one of the greatest games of all-time………..that resulted in a loss.

In the end Haddix pitched 12 perfect innings and lost in the 13th.  In the end he was more mad that he got the game loss instead of losing the perfect game.  In a night that no one saw the game on television and less than twenty thousand showed up, hundreds of thousands of people will remember exactly what happened because they were there or saw it on TV.  This game and its details followed Harvey until his untimely death in 1994.

This book is worth picking up, because it really explains all the details.  Its something that is eventually going get lost to the passage of time, so it is good that Freedman got the story on record before everyone forgets who Harvey Haddix was and why for one night he really was perfect.

You can get this book from the nice folks at McFarland

Hard-Luck Harvey Haddix

Happy Reading

Gregg

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