Baseball’s Peerless Semipros-Bushwick


When I had the thought of doing a book review blog, I figured I would stick to just doing autobiographies.  I knew there were tons of those types of books out there to pick from.  What I didn’t realize was that there was books on so many different facets of the history of the game.  I have been pleasantly surprised at some of the books I have found, and it has allowed me to become a history student again.  Todays book added some new information to my ever-growing knowledge base.

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Baseball’s Peerless Semipros

Thomas Barthel-2009 St. Johann Press

I will admit before I got this book I had never heard of the Bushwicks.  Happily though, through my learning process I found a very interesting story.  A bunch of semi-pros, former major leaguers and negro-leaguers formed a high quality team that most competitors found, was hard to beat.  Through the process of winning they also produced a form of civic pride that most residents of Brooklyn found more appealing than the professional teams of the day.

Max Rosner who was a Jewish immigrant was the owner of the Bushwicks.  Through his hard work and promotion he built a local empire.  He basically created one of, if not the biggest draw of the first half of the twentieth century participating in baseball.  That is no small feat if you consider he was competing against the Dodgers, Yankees and Giants in the same city.

I always find it interesting that you can see where something considered an innovation back in the day was derived from.  Rosner was the brainchild behind the idea of night baseball under the lights.  His idea sprang forth a full five years before the Cincinnati Reds decided to give it a try.  It is small innovations like that which are now part of the everyday norm in baseball.

Barthel gives you a year by year look at the Bushwicks and the triumphs and struggles they encountered along the way.  One of the big things they had an issue with was finding qualified competition.  The team existed in almost a no-mans land if you will.  They were not major league quality but still too good to be considered amateurs.  It almost looks as if they were a quality minor league team in an era before minor league baseball existed.

You really get a glimpse in to the inner workings of a baseball team before MLB ruled the world.  They may not have been the big apples within the Big Apple but they were still a pretty impressive team.  Books like this I always enjoy because they are definitely off of the mainstream that baseball fans normally read and talk about.   History buffs will really enjoy this and each fan should take the time to read and learn something new.

You can get this book from the nice folks at St. Johann Press.

http://www.stjohannpress.com

Happy Reading

Gregg

 

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One comment

  1. Pingback: Baseball's Peerless Semipros | St. Johann Press

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